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Thread: Trying to install a downloaded application

  1. #1

    Default Trying to install a downloaded application

    Hi,

    Hope I have posted this in the right place.

    I am new to Linux being entirely from a Windows background so I get lost quite easily at the moment. So far I have managed to find answers to all of my queries but I am stuck on this one as all answers seem to be the same. I have installed Leap on to my laptop and all is working fine. My brother, who also uses the laptop has started a course and needs to install something called Anaconda (he does not know Linux either).

    The installer has been downloaded (through the browser, not using Yast) and is sitting in root/home/simon/Downloads. According to the guide I just run a command via terminal and it starts to install but I cannot get it to go.

    Am I missing something here or should the commands be different?

    The file is root/home/simon/Downloads/Anaconda3-4.3.1-Linux-x86_64.sh

    The guide says to open terminal and run the following

    bash ~/Downloads/Anaconda3-4.3.1-Linux-x86_64.sh

    When I do, all I get is a message saying

    "bash: /root/Downloads/Anaconda3-4.3.1-Linux-x86_64.sh: No such file or directory"

    I have also tried substituting ~/Downloads with root/home/simon/Downloads and then the filename but get the same no such file message.

    I have browsed to the download folder and can confirm that a file with that name is present.

    Thanks in anticipation

    Simon

  2. #2
    Join Date
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    Default AW: Trying to install a downloaded application

    Try this:
    Code:
    ./home/simon/Downloads/Anaconda3-4.3.1-Linux-x86_64.sh
    PS:
    root is / or the home Folder for root is /root, but your Download is in the Users Folder /home/simon/.........

  3. #3
    Join Date
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    2,997

    Default Re: Trying to install a downloaded application

    The file is root/home/simon/Downloads/Anaconda3-4.3.1-Linux-x86_64.sh
    what is root?
    do you mean
    Code:
    /home/simon/Downloads/Anaconda3-4.3.1-Linux-x86_64.sh
    in that case you need to execute (use the full path)
    Code:
    sh /home/simon/Downloads/Anaconda3-4.3.1-Linux-x86_64.sh
    or use current path not as root~
    Code:
    cd ~/Downloads
    ./Anaconda3-4.3.1-Linux-x86_64.sh
    you can also do relative path (not as root as root has a different home directory which is /root I believe this is your problem)
    bash ~/Downloads/Anaconda3-4.3.1-Linux-x86_64.sh

    When I do, all I get is a message saying

    "bash: /root/Downloads/Anaconda3-4.3.1-Linux-x86_64.sh: No such file or directory"
    are you doing this as root?
    usually there is no need to run scripts as root
    if you don't know what you are doing it can mess up your system
    if you need to run it as root I'd say try sudo
    Code:
    cd ~/Downloads 
    sudo ./Anaconda3-4.3.1-Linux-x86_64.sh
    take a note of the ./ that means file in the current directory without it it won't run no need for sh or bash

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Trying to install a downloaded application

    Hello,

    Welcome to these forums.

    That said, I must point you to a, not easy to find, feature here: CODE tags.

    You get CODE tags in your forium post by clicking on the # button inn the tool bar of the forums. You use them to copy/past what you did and see on your terminal window in between the tags. >And please complete: the prompt, the command you typed, the output you got and inclusing the next prompt. Only so can we see what you saw. The bonus for youis that you have far less to explain (no " when I do this then I get that") because it is all there.

    This is the more important because I guess that there are some things wrongly copied (by manual typing?). Like Sauerland says there seems to be confusion about who is running (root or end-user) and whose home directory is used.
    Henk van Velden

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Trying to install a downloaded application

    Hi
    As an aside, just make sure it's set to executable (chmod 0755) also Anaconda3 is for python version 3.6 and is present with Tumbleweed, in openSUSE Leap only python 3.4 is available via standard install. Use the Anaconda2 version....
    Cheers Malcolm °¿° SUSE Knowledge Partner (Linux Counter #276890)
    SUSE SLE, openSUSE Leap/Tumbleweed (x86_64) | GNOME DE
    If you find this post helpful and are logged into the web interface,
    please show your appreciation and click on the star below... Thanks!

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Trying to install a downloaded application

    Quote Originally Posted by malcolmlewis View Post
    Hi
    As an aside, just make sure it's set to executable (chmod 0755) also Anaconda3 is for python version 3.6 and is present with Tumbleweed, in openSUSE Leap only python 3.4 is available via standard install. Use the Anaconda2 version....
    Python 3.6 is available to 42.2 in the develython3 repo(Actually, manually browsing I think I see 4.4 but not 3.6)
    https://software.opensuse.org/package/python3

    You can also install Anaconda's Python, it won't touch your openSUSE python libraries but will configure your PATH to grant precedence to the Anaconda python over the openSUSE python. If you ever wanted to undo the Anaconda python, simply remove the PATH entries pointing to the Anaconda Python or remove the entire Anaconda directory tree.

    BTW - Anaconda is designed to auto install into the directory of the current User. The reason why it's in your root /home directory is because you downloaded and installed as root (or in a "su" console). You can install in your ordinary User directory by executing the Anaconda install using "sudo" instead.

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  7. #7

    Default Re: Trying to install a downloaded application

    Hi everyone,

    Thanks for all of the replies. I seem to have confused everyone with root - sorry, not overly familiar with all of these terms at present. By root, I meant the location rather than running it with elevated privileges e.g. in windows terms (sorry but its what I know) c as opposed to root. Hope that clears that up.

    In any case after restarting and following the full path as suggested by I_A it installed and has been working ok thankyou - that is until I shut it down.

    I have tried it for the first time since shutting down today and I think I have royally stuffed it up somehow, only Anaconda has been installed - nothing else.

    When I start up now all I get is a box in the top left window that says

    "Could not start D-bus, can you call qdbus-qt5?" with a button titled Okay.

    From If I leave it nothing happens, If I click on the Okay button then it just changes to black and still nothing happens.

    From various searches it seems to be something to do with the system paths and something called qtpaths - think I might need to start over with all of this.

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Trying to install a downloaded application

    Root is confusing since it has at least 3 distinct meanings in Linux/Unix depending on context.

    1) the root partition this is where the
    2) root file system lives and the root directory /
    3) the root user is the administrator and has god privileges. In addition the root user's home directory lives on the root partition off the root directory at /root

    Confused? Most are at first but it really is not that hard but you do have to know the context of root when you speak of it. ie partition/directory/user

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Trying to install a downloaded application

    IMHO 1 and 2 are in fact the same. Unix//Linux has one directory tree (contraty to e.g. Windows which has more, indicated by A:, B:, etc.). Going from directory to directory in walking the branches of the tree is indicated by the character / (thus there no string 'root' involved). The root of the tree is this indicated by a simple / and all paths start with that.

    As the one and only directory tree consists of one or more mounted file systems, there always ii one file system that is mounted on /. Because of that it is often called the root file system.

    You can of course use the string 'root' as a file/directory name anywhere you like. And that is done for the home directory of the user root (/root), but that does not make it the root of the directory tree. In short / is not /root.

    Remind that having a tree structure in computing happens more often. Think e.g. of the tree of processes running (the process tree). And that also has a root. Like above it is only the starting point of any tree structure. In the process tree it is not written / however. Do
    Code:
    pstree
    to see the tree and it's root.

    Now the confusing part of this story.
    There is one user that has more privileges then others. Privileges that are given to it by the Kernel. As all users in a system are identified by a number (the userid or UID), that privileged user has such a number and is the one and only that het the userid 0 (zero).
    Now, all users also have a user name. For some reason the name given to the user with id 0 is root. That is done sometime in the beginning of Unix, but I have no idea why. As users are NOT organised in a tree, I have no idea why the name root was chosen. One could of course change that name (what is in a name), after all the number 0 is the decisive factor. But after so many years that would probably have so many repercussions, that it is better left as it is.
    Henk van Velden

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Trying to install a downloaded application

    Quote Originally Posted by hcvv View Post
    IMHO 1 and 2 are in fact the same. Unix//Linux has one directory tree (contraty to e.g. Windows which has more, indicated by A:, B:, etc.). Going from directory to directory in walking the branches of the tree is indicated by the character / (thus there no string 'root' involved). The root of the tree is this indicated by a simple / and all paths start with that.

    As the one and only directory tree consists of one or more mounted file systems, there always ii one file system that is mounted on /. Because of that it is often called the root file system.

    You can of course use the string 'root' as a file/directory name anywhere you like. And that is done for the home directory of the user root (/root), but that does not make it the root of the directory tree. In short / is not /root.

    Remind that having a tree structure in computing happens more often. Think e.g. of the tree of processes running (the process tree). And that also has a root. Like above it is only the starting point of any tree structure. In the process tree it is not written / however. Do
    Code:
    pstree
    to see the tree and it's root.

    Now the confusing part of this story.
    There is one user that has more privileges then others. Privileges that are given to it by the Kernel. As all users in a system are identified by a number (the userid or UID), that privileged user has such a number and is the one and only that het the userid 0 (zero).
    Now, all users also have a user name. For some reason the name given to the user with id 0 is root. That is done sometime in the beginning of Unix, but I have no idea why. As users are NOT organised in a tree, I have no idea why the name root was chosen. One could of course change that name (what is in a name), after all the number 0 is the decisive factor. But after so many years that would probably have so many repercussions, that it is better left as it is.
    I dunno...
    Getting slightly off-topic regarding this Forum topic but responding to how this thread has evolved...

    OS all over have similarities, and in particular it should be noted that the early 32-bit Windows (NT) OS architecture was heavily patterned on UNIX (and DEC) and those patterns have been retained through every succeeding version.

    So, for example...
    The Linux root partition is in many aspects extremely similar to what is the default Windows C:\ drive(aka partition).
    Yes, standards for mounting are different which is what you're describing about the A:\ and B:\ drives (Windows Drives are simply a type of mount point), IIRC this might have been one of those things from the DEC world (but don't hold me to that)
    The /opt and /srv subdirectories are typically used much like the Windows subdirectory C:\Program Files.
    Libraries are different, what is similar perhaps is that there are standard locations for OS libraries... likely because the practice simplifies applying security... But, for both Linux and Windows there are many examples where libraries are stored elsewhere. PATHs in both OS function the same and often resolve these unusual setups.
    As for the UNIX root User (id 0), technical people know that Windows has exactly the same... The built-in required User Administrator (id 500). No Linux install is without its inviolate root account, and no Windows install is without its similarly inviolate original Administrator account(today is hidden). For both OS, nowadays these special User accounts can be used to resolve issues when no other means is possible.
    And, Linux is the same as Windows in placing all User files and directories in a single directory tree, only in Linux we also have a standard option to deploy in a different partition, not just its own directory. But, there is no reason why someone couldn't do the same in Windows if they wish, and in fact is a common practice to similarly deploy that way as part of a "roaming profile."

    Believe it or not,
    With the right guidance an expert Windows tech guy can probably adapt to Linux today fairly quickly, and the reverse is true, too because despite all that propaganda, the OS converge on what works and what doesn't.
    That's aside also though,
    That when talking about the technology itself(not just how to use the technology) there are some things that Linux does much, much better than Windows, but there are also scenarios where the reverse is also true.

    Blabbering,
    TSU
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