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Thread: How to control LibreOffice Draw PDF export file size?

  1. #1
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    Default How to control LibreOffice Draw PDF export file size?

    I am exporting LibreOffice Draw (odg) files into pdf. In older versions, LibreOffice Draw would create an 8M pdf file from a 52.8M odg file. This 52.8M odg file now converts into a pdf that is about 19M.

    This odg file mostly contains jpg images. I suspect that the older version was compressing the jpg files more. I don't see a setting for jpg compression or pdf compression on LibreOffice.

    Any help would be appreciated.
    The greatest obstacle to discovery is not ignorance, it is the illusion of knowledge.
    Daniel J. Boorstin US Patent Office

  2. #2
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    Default Re: How to control LibreOffice Draw PDF export file size?

    The issue appears to be due to an LibreOffice Draw upgrade. Version 5.0.6.3 produces smaller pdfs. The latest version 5.2.5.1 produces significantly larger pdf files. There doesn't appear to be a setting to control the file size.

    The work around is to import lower quality jpg files.
    The greatest obstacle to discovery is not ignorance, it is the illusion of knowledge.
    Daniel J. Boorstin US Patent Office

  3. #3
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    Default Re: How to control LibreOffice Draw PDF export file size?

    The issue is more to do with the fact that the PDF is having to cope with bit-mapped rather than vector images. LibreOffice uses a vector format by default. So, if you were able to convert the JPEGs to a vector format (perhaps using Inkscape), you would find that LibreOffice would naturally generate much smaller files.

  4. #4

    Default AW: Re: How to control LibreOffice Draw PDF export file size?

    Quote Originally Posted by john_hudson View Post
    The issue is more to do with the fact that the PDF is having to cope with bit-mapped rather than vector images. LibreOffice uses a vector format by default. So, if you were able to convert the JPEGs to a vector format (perhaps using Inkscape), you would find that LibreOffice would naturally generate much smaller files.
    This is not generally true.

    Using a vector based format would only make sense if the original data for a picture actually _is_ vector based, let's say for some CAD image, a chemical structure drawing or a (more or less) simple logo.

    If you would try to convert a photo of let's say your grandma to a vector based format, this would -if it works at all- produce a much bigger file.

    AK

  5. #5
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    Default Re: How to control LibreOffice Draw PDF export file size?

    from Draw if you select file=>export to pdf
    the pdf export dialog appears there you can set the jpeg q factor
    the default is q=90% you can try reducing it to 80 or 75
    imo the biggest problem with jpeg in pdf is a lot of people embed extremely large images which are then downsized, downsampling images can reduce the output
    https://help.libreoffice.org/Common/..._as_PDF#Images

  6. #6
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    Default Re: AW: Re: How to control LibreOffice Draw PDF export file size?

    Quote Originally Posted by Akoellh View Post
    This is not generally true.

    Using a vector based format would only make sense if the original data for a picture actually _is_ vector based, let's say for some CAD image, a chemical structure drawing or a (more or less) simple logo.

    If you would try to convert a photo of let's say your grandma to a vector based format, this would -if it works at all- produce a much bigger file.

    AK
    Since the OP is using LibreOffice Draw, I would be surprised if the images are photos though perhaps they are. Almost any diagrammatic bitmap image with less than eight distinct colours can easily be converted into a vector using Inkscape - I have been doing it for years. It also makes them so easy to edit.

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