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Thread: Roll Back.

  1. #1

    Default Roll Back.

    I cannot seem to find the means by which I can Roll Back my set-up (KDE).
    I accepted some changes, which has created problems; I wish to undo them,
    and most guides relate to Default install, which (previously) leads to loosing
    All/Most, of my settings; That is why Roll Back would be the Resolution?
    David.

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Roll Back.

    When you want to be able to restore a former configuration, first backup before you start to meddle. For KDE that would mean making a copy of ~/.kde4/ and maybe also ~/.local

    Or, make mental or written notes on what you change, so you can change back.

    Or both, to be sure.

    Or restore those files from your normal backup . I do not know what your backup frequency is, but even with weekly backups you can fall back to a maximum of one week ago and the frequency of changing the desktop configurations isn't mostly that high.
    Henk van Velden

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Roll Back.

    If a default install was done with 13.2 then the file systems are BTRFS on root and XFS on home (where your KDE setting live). Root is set to use snapper which you can roll back but to my knowledge xfs can not. you must use your backups. You do have backups right???? In any case renaming or removing your /home/usernamehere/.kde4/share/config directory will bring you back to default. Note that you cna not do this while logged in and running KDE as your user since those files are in use. I boot to terminal log in rename the diectory and then reboot to the default desktop settings

  4. #4

    Default Re: Roll Back.

    It would appear that I am far from being alone in this respect.
    What happens is that you do an Install, agree to changes, your system 'breaks', and you wish to revert.
    So, if you can remember the change that you agreed to, how can you UNDO it, without leaving a corrupted Desktop,
    i.e., One that existed, prior to the change?
    Where should I search, in order to locate the Files etc., to, say, delete, in order to return to 'normality'.
    David.

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Roll Back.

    I do not see your question as differenty from earlier. Thus the answer is the same: from any backup/copy you made, preferable just before the change.

    And inside ~/.kde4 you can look for specific files used by specific parts/applications in ~/.kde4/share, specialy the apps and config directories there. You may try to edit individual files there (but, please first make a copy!) ro repair.
    Henk van Velden

  6. #6

    Default Re: Roll Back.

    I can appreciate your frustration, so let me ask the question from a different perspective.
    If you Download and Install some Software (Media Player), for which I had to accept some changes;
    Why then, if it is Deleted, am I left with the altered state, rather than the system reverting to the Pre-Installed State.
    Shouldn't THAT be the accepted Norm?
    David.

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Roll Back.

    Quote Originally Posted by djmax11 View Post
    If you Download and Install some Software (Media Player), for which I had to accept some changes;
    Why then, if it is Deleted, am I left with the altered state, rather than the system reverting to the Pre-Installed State.
    Which changes? It is unknown if some configuration change was done on behalf of a package intallation or because the system administrator simply wanted it for other reasons only known to him.

    Why I admit that what you want might be achievable to a degree that goes a bit further then it does now, there is no fixed way to do this for every program and program combination (and you now have examples from system data as well as from the user data and you should maybe add all user data, like a changed document), except maybe by using a file system like btrfs and then run snapper quite often. It takes space, but as far as I know, it functions.

    But it is you, in your system administrator role, that decides if you want to read about snapper, and if it is what you like and if you want to implement it on your system. The default is already to have snapper (with btrfs) switched on for the root partition and many people decided to switch it off and even not to use btrfs. Others love it because it enables them e.g. to revert faulty software updates easy. You can do likewise and even extend it to your /home partition.

    And for anything you think it should be the excepted norm, but is only not in Linux out of lazyness, you are welcome to start designing and programming. This is the Open Source world and when you present your project wth enough enthousiasm, people may jump up to help you.
    Henk van Velden

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Roll Back.

    There are two levels you must deal with SYSTEM and USER. Since Linux is multi user these two groups are separate and distinct.

    When you install software you generally do it as root user and the files go to the root partition. This is a SYSTEM change since all user can see and use the installed program.

    When you change the configuration this is unique to a given user and thus is a USER change and the configuration files are stored in the given users home directory.

    So your question seem to span two different groups of items. For installed software and assuming you used the default BTRFS file system then there is a program called snapper which takes snap shots and can be used to roll back changes. (see man snapper or look it up on the web)

    If you are concerned with user configuration changes such as KDE settings they are in your and each other users personal home directory. These are not included in the snapshots. You must therefore rely on your backups.

    Note back ups are essential for proper computer maintenance. If you are not keeping backups consider what happens when your disk drive or SSD breaks, and it will. What happens to your stuff then??

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Roll Back.

    Quote Originally Posted by gogalthorp View Post
    Note back ups are essential for proper computer maintenance. If you are not keeping backups consider what happens when your disk drive or SSD breaks, and it will. What happens to your stuff then??
    I know that this horror scenario is often presented to convince people to make backups. And of course these things happen and you should be prepaired.

    But in daily life as I know it, the chance that one of your user (my wife, myself) hops in and says: I have just deleted some pictures, edited a document beyond recognition, .... is much more frequent. And your backup policy should cope for that also. And that is also the scope where we are talking about here: some user that managed to break some of his files.

    As systems manager/administrator, it is realy a worthfull thing to sit down for a while and ask yourself: for what incidents do I want to be prepaired. Like any combination of:
    • individual lost files;
    • completely broken mass-storage device (partition);
    • being able to restore from how long ago (an hour, a day, a week,...)
    • how many instances (a daily backup kept for 7 days and a weekly backup kept for 10 weeks, ...)
    • storage, what when the computer burns out (backups on connected hardware), what when the house burns down, ....

    After you deciede that (and that includes deciding what to do not), you can go and find tools. Not needed to use the same tool for everything you need. E.g. snapper for your system disk, rsync for individual user file, dd for e.g. a sable (not running) databse partitions, etc.

    And once put into place, do not forget to make a restore plan and test that.
    Henk van Velden

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Roll Back.

    Without a backup or running a file system that supports snapshots like BTRFS or ZFS, you won't have a quick and easy "one click" solution to roll back all changes to your system.

    But, YAST might be able to help you roll back individual packages...

    If you want to know what happened to your system whenever you updated or installed a package, YAST can provide that for you.

    YAST > Options > History

    You can select any package that changed and "jump to" to inspect the individual package.
    You can then click on "changes" (or similar), by default all history is displayed but you can modify.
    You can then select a specific historical version of that package and hopefully by clicking the "roll back" button YAST will try to roll back to that package version.

    HTH,
    TSU

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