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Thread: Fingerprint Reader and openSUSE 13.2 - SOLVED

  1. #1

    Thumbs up Fingerprint Reader and openSUSE 13.2 - SOLVED

    The fingerprint reader does work properly in openSUSE 13.2.

    If your fingerprint reader worked in openSUSE 13.1 or 12.3, you can make it work in openSUSE 13.2.

    These instructions are intended for the many fingerprint readers supported by libfprint. This is actually a short and simple process, even though it may seem complex due to the detailed nature of the instructions.



    Install the Fingerprint Reader Software

    Log in as root (the administrative user).

    Make sure your Internet connection is properly configured and active.

    Open Konsole or your favorite terminal.

    Note: Where it says <Enter>, press the key on the keyboard labelled "Enter".

    In Konsole, enter the following command:
    Code:
    zypper install fprintd fprintd-pam fprintd-pam-32bit libfprint0<Enter>
    

    All the software necessary to support the fingerprint reader will be installed.


    Enabling the Fingerprint Reader

    There were some significant changes in the fingerprint software from openSUSE 13.1 to 13.2 that broke fingerprint reader functionality. We need to first compensate for these changes using the following commands.

    Log in as root (the administrative user).

    Open Konsole or your favorite terminal.

    In Konsole, enter the following commands:
    Code:
    cd /lib/security<Enter>
    
    ln --symbolic pam_fprintd.so pam_fprint.so<Enter>
    If you have a 64-bit computer, you will also need to do:
    Code:
    cd /lib64/security<Enter>
    
    ln --symbolic pam_fprintd.so pam_fprint.so<Enter>
    Next, regardless if your computer is 64-bit or not, do:
    Code:
    pam-config -a --fprint<Enter>
    Now the fingerprint reader is ready to use.

    Before continuing, please be aware fingerprint data created in openSUSE 13.1 or earlier is not compatible with the fingerprint reader software used in openSUSE 13.2, and all users will need to be enrolled again.


    Enrolling a User's Fingerprint

    Notes: Only users who have an existing username and password may have their fingerprints enrolled. A user who is not root may enroll their own fingerprint, if they are logged in under their own username. root can enroll all users' fingerprints.

    The command we are most interested in now is fprintd-enroll, so let us see how to use the command; and, then give everyone an example of how to use it.
    Code:
    fprintd-enroll --help<Enter>
    Usage:
      fprintd-enroll [OPTION...] [username] Enroll a fingerprint
    
    Help Options:
      -h, --help        Show help options
    
    Application Options:
      -f, --finger      Finger selected to verify (default is automatic)
    The command option "--finger" must be followed by any one of these identifiers:
    Code:
    left-thumb
    left-index-finger
    left-middle-finger
    left-ring-finger
    left-little-finger
    right-thumb
    right-index-finger
    right-middle-finger
    right-ring-finger
    right-little-finger
    Do not use more than one of the identifiers listed above in the same command.

    Now that we know the details of how to enroll a fingerprint, let us enroll our friend Alex using his right index finger:
    Code:
    fprintd-enroll --finger right-index-finger Alex<Enter>
    fprintd-enroll will respond with something similar to:
    Code:
    Using device /net/reactivated/Fprint/Device/0
    Enrolling right-index-finger finger.
    Alex scans his finger over the reader, and fprintd-enroll responds with:
    Code:
    Enroll result: enroll-stage-passed
    Alex scans his finger 4 more times over the reader, and his fingerprint is accepted with:
    Code:
    Enroll result: enroll-completed
    Alex can now log in using his fingerprint instead of his password.

    Without my interspersed comments, enrolling Alex's fingerprint looks like this:
    Code:
    fprintd-enroll --finger right-index-finger Alex<Enter>
    Using device /net/reactivated/Fprint/Device/0
    Enrolling right-index-finger finger.
    Enroll result: enroll-stage-passed
    Enroll result: enroll-stage-passed
    Enroll result: enroll-stage-passed
    Enroll result: enroll-stage-passed
    Enroll result: enroll-completed
    If we want to enroll our other friend David using his left ring finger, it would look like this:
    Code:
    fprintd-enroll --finger left-ring-finger David<Enter>

    Enrolling root's Fingerprint

    Enrolling root (the system administrator) works the same way as enrolling a regular user, except one must be logged in as root.

    Log in as root (the administrative user).

    Open Konsole or your favorite terminal.

    For this example we will enroll root using his/her right middle finger:
    Code:
    fprintd-enroll --finger right-middle-finger root<Enter>

    Logging Into the KDE Destop Using the Fingerprint Reader


    1. First, enter your username into the username field.
    2. Press the <Tab> key to get the the password field, or click on the password field.
    3. Press the <Enter> key. A dialog box will appear requesting the user scan their finger on the fingerprint reader.
    4. Press the <Enter> key.
    5. Scan your finger on the fingerprint reader. If your fingerprint is recognized, you will be logged into your KDE desktop.
    6. If reading your fingerprint fails, the screen will display the message "Login failed". Go back to Step 3.
    7. If reading your fingerprint repeatedly fails, you can type in your password, then press the <Enter> key. If your password is recognized, you will be logged into your KDE desktop.


    I do not know how to log in using Gnome, so please do not ask me. I do not use Gnome at all.


    Logging In When the Screen Is Locked


    1. If the screensaver is active, press the <Space Bar>. In reality, one could press any key; yet, I do not want new users searching for the <Any Key> since it does not exist.
    2. Press the <Enter> key. The authentication dialog box will change to request the user scan their finger on the fingerprint reader.
    3. Scan your finger on the fingerprint reader. If your fingerprint is recognized, you will be logged into your KDE desktop.
    4. If reading your fingerprint repeatedly fails, you can type in your password, then press the <Enter> key. If your password is recognized, you will be logged into your KDE desktop.



    Authentication from a Command Started by kdesu

    When the fingerprint reader is enabled and kdesu is executed, a rather strange behaviour is exhibited. The light on the fingerprint reader will illuminate, the system will wait for a fingerprint to be scanned, and there will be no other indication the system requires any user interaction - no dialog box and no sounds. At this point:

    1. Scan your finger on the fingerprint reader.
    2. Scan your finger again on the fingerprint reader. If your fingerprint is recognized, the requested command will be executed.


    If the fingerprint scan fails, KDE's authentication dialog box will appear. continue to the next section below.


    Authenticating in KDE's Authentication Dialog Box


    When you see KDE's authentication dialog box, which looks something like this:




    1. Press the <Enter> key.
    2. Scan your finger on the fingerprint reader.
    3. Scan your finger again on the fingerprint reader. If your fingerprint is recognized, the requested command will be executed.



    Autheticating on the Command Line

    When using the command line and a password is required to gain access, the user will see:
    Code:
    Swipe your finger across the fingerprint reader
    Scan your finger on the fingerprint reader. If your fingerprint is recognized, access will be granted to the command used.


    Other Fingerprint Reader Commands


    The following commands use the same structure as fprintd-enroll:
    fprintd-delete
    fprintd-enroll
    fprintd-list
    fprintd-verify




    Everything described above was tested on my Lenovo ThinkPad X220 running openSUSE 13.2 for 64-bit, which uses the Upek Touchstrip Fingerprint Sensor:
    Code:
    lsusb<Enter>
    Bus 001 Device 003: ID 147e:2016 Upek Biometric Touchchip/Touchstrip Fingerprint Sensor

    Keywords:
    fingerprint, finger print, reader, scanner, fprint, libfprint, Lenovo, ThinkPad, openSUSE 13.2, 13.2, Upek, X220, 147e:2016
    Last edited by Max314; 21-Mar-2015 at 23:47. Reason: spelling mistake

  2. #2
    Join Date
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    Default Re: Fingerprint Reader and openSUSE 13.2 - SOLVED

    Thanks for sharing this information, but as it is not a request for help, it will be moved to the 'Unreviewed How To and FAQ' sub-forum.

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Fingerprint Reader and openSUSE 13.2 - SOLVED

    Moved from the Hardware forum.

  4. #4

    Thumbs up Re: Fingerprint Reader and openSUSE 13.2 - SOLVED

    Thank you Max314 for the great how-to! I use a Lenovo T420, but i guess the fingerprint reader is more or less the same. Anyway, works excellent.

  5. #5

    Default Re: Fingerprint Reader and openSUSE 13.2 - SOLVED

    Quote Originally Posted by spktkpkt View Post
    Thank you Max314 for the great how-to! I use a Lenovo T420, but i guess the fingerprint reader is more or less the same. Anyway, works excellent.
    I'm so glad I could help! I was wondering if anyone but me would benefit from the many hours of work it took me to create the tutorial.

    Thank you very much for your compliment and gratitude!
    ---
    Max

  6. #6

    Default Re: Fingerprint Reader and openSUSE 13.2 - SOLVED

    Works very good for my needs. ThinkPad T60; This should be in the Portal as most informations found on the internet will guide you to YaST Finger print reader albeit there seem to be no package at the moment.

    And following your instructions was easy.

    Greetings,

    R

  7. #7

    Default Re: Fingerprint Reader and openSUSE 13.2 - SOLVED

    Quote Originally Posted by revealed View Post
    Works very good for my needs. ThinkPad T60; This should be in the Portal as most informations found on the internet will guide you to YaST Finger print reader albeit there seem to be no package at the moment.And following your instructions was easy.
    I'm very glad everything worked well for you, and the tutorial was easy to use. Thank you for your vote of confidence. You are correct there is currently no YaST module for setting up the fingerprint reader. From what I gathered, there is no intention to make one either. I very much appreciated how the old YaST fingerprint reader module made set-up so easy.

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