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Thread: question about support cycle

  1. #1
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    Question question about support cycle

    Hi, I am new to linux and willing to learn.
    I have a very beginner question and not sure if it should be posted here as I couldn't find a suitabe area to post.
    I read from somewhere that says about the support cycle of OpenSUSE:

    "Release cycle: openSUSE releases are supported for 18 months and are released every 9 months or so"

    I am not quite understand what does this mean, is this means that if i build a linux box with all my software runing on it and the whole system will only function for 18 months? after 18 months, is that mean i have to reinstall a new released opensuse and rebuild the whole system over again?

    thank you and any response would be much appreacated.
    P.S.: please bear with my english, it's my second language.

    J

  2. #2
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    Default Re: question about support cycle

    Hi,

    it means you will receive security patches and fixes for X months after release and when it reaches End of life it simply won't get patches but everything will work normally.

    You can update to a newer distribution release easily with just a few commands and get the X months of updates again - naturally for free like always.
    .: miuku #suse @ irc.freenode.net
    :: miuku@opensuse.org

    .: h​ttps://download.opensuse.org/repositories/home:/Miuku/

  3. #3
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    Default Re: question about support cycle

    thank you Miuku!
    then if i update to a new relaese, all those software (I mean, those I installed from repositores pack that come with the release via yast, or zypper) will still be there and work?
    I'll ask what are the "few commands" when it comes to update then.
    it sounds like it is very much like windows update, once everything installed/build, then getting patches and patches and then take some effort to upgread o/s to a new version. to me it's similar system life cycle.
    then, just curious, from some articles, why they are complaining the support cycle? is that becuase too short? 18 month seems to be fine with a working system as long as you don't have to rebuild it over again to upgrade.

    thanks again!

    p.s: I am 15+ years windows system admin users and want to start to learn and switch to linux

  4. #4
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    Default Re: question about support cycle

    Just the same as Windows in that updates are fixes/patches and version chnage is a new version. The changes are predictable also there are long term support versions like evergreen based on 13.1

  5. #5

    Default Re: question about support cycle

    Quote Originally Posted by jusplace View Post
    thank you Miuku!
    then if i update to a new relaese, all those software (I mean, those I installed from repositores pack that come with the release via yast, or zypper) will still be there and work?
    I'll ask what are the "few commands" when it comes to update then.
    it sounds like it is very much like windows update, once everything installed/build, then getting patches and patches and then take some effort to upgread o/s to a new version. to me it's similar system life cycle.
    then, just curious, from some articles, why they are complaining the support cycle? is that becuase too short? 18 month seems to be fine with a working system as long as you don't have to rebuild it over again to upgrade.

    thanks again!

    p.s: I am 15+ years windows system admin users and want to start to learn and switch to linux
    I personally think that the support cycle is too short. The laptop that I am writing on was originally systemed with opensuse 12.3, which went off support this last December. I considered my options and decided to rebuild the system.

    It *is* possible to update things easily, as described above. But that works well mostly if you keep your system relatively vanilla (meaning nothing built from source, using only the most common repositories). This is true for most people. But I had to run a custom kernel that I built on my system, and some other software that was compiled from source, and some other things that came from rather odd repositories, so an "update" was just not reasonable for me.

    I think that a support cycle that more closely represents the expected lifespan of the hardware would be most convenient. That said, I also understand that resources are scarce and a longer support cycle is not really doable. So, I work with what opensuse provides, and am generally happy with it.

  6. #6
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    Default Re: question about support cycle

    Use evergreen it is good for 4 cycles. Tumbleweed is alas moving forward the update are new stuff not just fixes. So you have a new system with each update. There is something for anyone

  7. #7
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    Default Re: question about support cycle

    On Fri 20 Feb 2015 04:26:01 PM CST, JJMT wrote:


    jusplace;2695967 Wrote:
    > thank you Miuku!
    > then if i update to a new relaese, all those software (I mean, those I
    > installed from repositores pack that come with the release via yast,
    > or zypper) will still be there and work?
    > I'll ask what are the "few commands" when it comes to update then.
    > it sounds like it is very much like windows update, once everything
    > installed/build, then getting patches and patches and then take some
    > effort to upgread o/s to a new version. to me it's similar system life
    > cycle.
    > then, just curious, from some articles, why they are complaining the
    > support cycle? is that becuase too short? 18 month seems to be fine
    > with a working system as long as you don't have to rebuild it over
    > again to upgrade.
    >
    > thanks again!
    >
    > p.s: I am 15+ years windows system admin users and want to start to
    > learn and switch to linux


    I personally think that the support cycle is too short. The laptop that
    I am writing on was originally systemed with opensuse 12.3, which went
    off support this last December. I considered my options and decided to
    rebuild the system.

    It *is* possible to update things easily, as described above. But that
    works well mostly if you keep your system relatively vanilla (meaning
    nothing built from source, using only the most common repositories).
    This is true for most people. But I had to run a custom kernel that I
    built on my system, and some other software that was compiled from
    source, and some other things that came from rather odd repositories, so
    an "update" was just not reasonable for me.

    I think that a support cycle that more closely represents the expected
    lifespan of the hardware would be most convenient. That said, I also
    understand that resources are scarce and a longer support cycle is not
    really doable. So, I work with what opensuse provides, and am generally
    happy with it.


    Hi
    Not only resources but security issues having to backport fixes can be
    time consuming for the maintainers. There is 13.1 which is meant to go
    evergreen....

    --
    Cheers Malcolm °¿° LFCS, SUSE Knowledge Partner (Linux Counter #276890)
    SUSE Linux Enterprise Desktop 12 GNOME 3.10.1 Kernel 3.12.36-38-default
    If you find this post helpful and are logged into the web interface,
    please show your appreciation and click on the star below... Thanks!


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