Page 2 of 6 FirstFirst 1234 ... LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 52

Thread: Opensuse Boot Time

  1. #11

    Default Re: Opensuse Boot Time

    Quote Originally Posted by robin_listas View Post
    Have a read on the logs, see if something leaps to the eye...
    Hi Carlos, Thanks for the help! I went to logs to see if i found something new... And i found this in boot.log:

    Code:
    [*     ] (1 of 3) A start job is running for Name Service Cache Daemon (16s / 1min 38s)
    [**    ] (1 of 3) A start job is running for Name Service Cache Daemon (16s / 1min 38s)
    [***   ] (1 of 3) A start job is running for Name Service Cache Daemon (17s / 1min 38s)
    [ ***  ] (2 of 3) A start job is running for Avahi mDNS/DNS-SD Stack (17s / 1min 38s)
    [  *** ] (2 of 3) A start job is running for Avahi mDNS/DNS-SD Stack (18s / 1min 38s)
    [   ***] (2 of 3) A start job is running for Avahi mDNS/DNS-SD Stack (18s / 1min 38s)
    [    **] (3 of 3) A start job is running for Network Manager (19s / 1min 41s)
    [     *] (3 of 3) A start job is running for Network Manager (19s / 1min 41s)
    [    **] (3 of 3) A start job is running for Network Manager (20s / 1min 41s)
    [   ***] (1 of 3) A start job is running for Name Service Cache Daemon (20s / 1min 38s)
    [  *** ] (1 of 3) A start job is running for Name Service Cache Daemon (21s / 1min 38s)
    [ ***  ] (1 of 3) A start job is running for Name Service Cache Daemon (21s / 1min 38s)
    [***   ] (2 of 3) A start job is running for Avahi mDNS/DNS-SD Stack (22s / 1min 38s)
    And this repeat happen 4 or more times. It's normal this services repeat so often in bootloader?

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Spain
    Posts
    25,547

    Default Re: Opensuse Boot Time

    On 2014-12-11 03:16, marcusvcl wrote:
    >
    > robin_listas;2682058 Wrote:
    >>
    >> Have a read on the logs, see if something leaps to the eye...
    >>

    >
    > Hi Carlos, Thanks for the help! I went to logs to see if i found
    > something new... And i found this in boot.log:
    >
    >
    > Code:
    > --------------------
    >
    > [* ] (1 of 3) A start job is running for Name Service Cache Daemon (16s / 1min 38s)
    > [** ] (1 of 3) A start job is running for Name Service Cache Daemon (16s / 1min 38s)
    > [*** ] (1 of 3) A start job is running for Name Service Cache Daemon (17s / 1min 38s)
    > [ *** ] (2 of 3) A start job is running for Avahi mDNS/DNS-SD Stack (17s / 1min 38s)
    > [ *** ] (2 of 3) A start job is running for Avahi mDNS/DNS-SD Stack (18s / 1min 38s)
    > [ ***] (2 of 3) A start job is running for Avahi mDNS/DNS-SD Stack (18s / 1min 38s)
    > [ **] (3 of 3) A start job is running for Network Manager (19s / 1min 41s)
    > [ *] (3 of 3) A start job is running for Network Manager (19s / 1min 41s)
    > [ **] (3 of 3) A start job is running for Network Manager (20s / 1min 41s)
    > [ ***] (1 of 3) A start job is running for Name Service Cache Daemon (20s / 1min 38s)
    > [ *** ] (1 of 3) A start job is running for Name Service Cache Daemon (21s / 1min 38s)
    > [ *** ] (1 of 3) A start job is running for Name Service Cache Daemon (21s / 1min 38s)
    > [*** ] (2 of 3) A start job is running for Avahi mDNS/DNS-SD Stack (22s / 1min 38s)
    >
    > --------------------


    I don't know what the times mean in this file, but I don't think they
    are relevant.

    On a normal system you would look at /var/log/messages. On 13.2, without
    syslog, you would have to look at "journalctl", playing with the
    --since=, --until= options. See "man journalctl" for details. Or perhaps
    "-b". Sorry, I'm unfamiliar with the command myself.


    > And this repeat happen 4 or more times. It's normal this services repeat
    > so often in bootloader?


    Yes, (guessing) because the file contains screen commands, so that lines
    overwrite one another at the proper place, with some different
    substring, like the current time. In the screen, you see the information
    flowing by. I don't know the screen commands by sight (escapes), but it
    could be that.

    Try "cat /var/log/boot.log" in a terminal, perhaps it runs that way.

    --
    Cheers / Saludos,

    Carlos E. R.
    (from 13.1 x86_64 "Bottle" at Telcontar)

  3. #13

    Default Re: Opensuse Boot Time

    When i disable my firewall, i had this in systemd-analyze blame:
    Code:
    systemd-analyze blame
         1min 4.732s avahi-daemon.service
         1min 4.706s nscd.service
         1min 4.321s NetworkManager.service
              5.460s apparmor.service
              3.291s alsa-restore.service
              3.184s vboxadd-x11.service
              3.058s vboxadd.service
              3.052s wpa_supplicant.service
              2.602s postfix.service
              2.575s rc-local.service
              2.191s polkit.service
              1.305s display-manager.service
              1.286s lvm2-activation.service
              1.282s boot-grub2-x86_64\x2defi.mount
              1.244s systemd-fsck@dev-disk-by\x2duuid-8a52fc06\x2d4e19\x2d4832\x2d87d0\x2dc
              1.221s tmp.mount
              1.155s usr-local.mount
              1.137s dev-disk-by\x2duuid-a33a3a13\x2d6000\x2d49be\x2da99b\x2d295905819ee4.s
              1.015s var-log.mount
               983ms srv.mount
               978ms boot-efi.mount
               956ms systemd-udev-settle.service
               953ms sys-kernel-debug.mount
               952ms dev-hugepages.mount
               952ms dev-mqueue.mount
               902ms systemd-remount-fs.service
               791ms opt.mount
               787ms cycle.service
               786ms vboxdrv.service
               772ms var-lib-pgsql.mount
               765ms var-lib-named.mount
               764ms var-lib-mailman.mount
               716ms systemd-tmpfiles-setup-dev.service
               659ms lvm2-activation-early.service
               565ms boot-grub2-i386\x2dpc.mount
               534ms var-crash.mount
               534ms lvm2-activation-net.service
               517ms var-opt.mount
               462ms systemd-udev-trigger.service
               425ms systemd-udev-root-symlink.service
               364ms \x2esnapshots.mount
               355ms plymouth-read-write.service
               262ms var-spool.mount
               248ms var-tmp.mount
               241ms udisks2.service
               217ms systemd-readahead-replay.service
               212ms systemd-tmpfiles-setup.service
               200ms ModemManager.service
               196ms systemd-user-sessions.service
               191ms systemd-modules-load.service
               171ms auditd.service
               152ms systemd-rfkill@rfkill0.service
               146ms systemd-journald.service
               117ms systemd-update-utmp.service
               103ms home.mount
                99ms rtkit-daemon.service
                87ms iscsi.service
                71ms systemd-sysctl.service
                69ms systemd-udevd.service
                65ms systemd-readahead-done.service
                64ms user@1000.service
                62ms upower.service
                40ms systemd-logind.service
                29ms plymouth-start.service
                24ms systemd-readahead-collect.service
                11ms systemd-vconsole-setup.service
                 7ms systemd-journal-flush.service
                 5ms systemd-update-utmp-runlevel.service
                 4ms kmod-static-nodes.service
                 2ms systemd-random-seed.service
                 1ms systemd-backlight@backlight:intel_backlight.service
    And the systemd-analyze critical-chain:
    Code:
    graphical.target @1min 26.787s
    └─multi-user.target @1min 26.787s
      └─cron.service @1min 26.787s
        └─postfix.service @1min 24.182s +2.602s
          └─network.target @1min 24.155s
            └─NetworkManager.service @19.833s +1min 4.321s
              └─basic.target @16.543s
                └─timers.target @16.542s
                  └─systemd-tmpfiles-clean.timer @16.542s
                    └─sysinit.target @16.542s
                      └─systemd-journald.service @1min 22.695s +146ms
                        └─system.slice
                          └─-.slice
    With the log posted above, i think that we're more closer to problem now. Thanks again for everyone.
    (Maybe is a case of a fresh install?)

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Spain
    Posts
    25,547

    Default Re: Opensuse Boot Time

    On 2014-12-11 03:56, marcusvcl wrote:
    >
    > When i disable my firewall, i had this in systemd-analyze blame:


    Forget "blame", it is difficult to interpret. I can't.

    > And the systemd-analyze critical-chain:


    This one is the most indicative one.


    > Code:
    > --------------------


    > └─NetworkManager.service @19.833s +1min 4.321s


    > --------------------


    Well, now we see that it is the network that takes long to start.

    > With the log posted above, i think that we're more closer to problem
    > now. Thanks again for everyone.
    > (Maybe is a case of a fresh install?)


    In Linux, reinstall seldom solves things.

    See my previous post re log reading, you have to look about 19 seconds
    after boot start, and see what happens, till a minute later.


    Guessing, you use dhcp and takes long. But maybe not.

    --
    Cheers / Saludos,

    Carlos E. R.
    (from 13.1 x86_64 "Bottle" at Telcontar)

  5. #15

    Default Re: Opensuse Boot Time

    Hi,
    I played around with journalctl --boot=ID and i found something that can maybe give us a clue.
    I tried to find some time's lapse in log, i don't know if i looked in right place, but...
    Here the pieces of result:

    Code:
    Dez 11 08:32:08 Marcus systemd-journal[413]: Permanent journal is using 88.0M (max allowed 4.0G, trying to leave 4.0G free of 26.7G available → curren
    Dez 11 08:33:07 Marcus systemd-journal[413]: Time spent on flushing to /var is 59.119844s for 915 entries.
    Code:
    Dez 11 08:32:02 Marcus acpid[980]: waiting for events: event logging is off
    Dez 11 08:32:02 Marcus nscd[992]: 992 cannot create /var/run/nscd/passwd; no persistent database used
    Dez 11 08:32:02 Marcus nscd[992]: 992 cannot create /var/run/nscd/group; no persistent database used
    Dez 11 08:32:02 Marcus nscd[992]: 992 cannot create /var/run/nscd/services; no persistent database used
    Dez 11 08:33:09 Marcus nscd[992]: 992 cannot create /var/run/nscd/netgroup; no persistent database used
    Code:
    Dez 11 08:32:03 Marcus systemd[1]: Dependency failed for LSB: VirtualBox Additions service.
    Dez 11 08:32:53 Marcus systemd[1]: systemd-journald.service watchdog timeout!
    If none of this give us a clue, i'm glad to search again in journalctl for more reasons.
    And the cat /var/log/boot.log

    Code:
    [     *] (1 of 3) A start job is running for Name Service Cache Daemon (1min 1s / 1min 
    [    **] (1 of 3) A start job is running for Name Service Cache Daemon (1min 1s / 1min 
    [   ***] (2 of 3) A start job is running for Avahi mDNS/DNS-SD Stack (1min 2s / 1min 38
    [  *** ] (2 of 3) A start job is running for Avahi mDNS/DNS-SD Stack (1min 2s / 1min 38
    [ ***  ] (2 of 3) A start job is running for Avahi mDNS/DNS-SD Stack (1min 3s / 1min 38
    [**    ] (1 of 3) A start job is running for Name Service Cache Daemon (1min 5s / 1min 
    [***   ] (1 of 3) A start job is running for Name Service Cache Daemon (1min 5s / 1min 
    [ ***  ] (1 of 3) A start job is running for Name Service Cache Daemon (1min 6s / 1min 
    [  *** ] (2 of 3) A start job is running for Avahi mDNS/DNS-SD Stack (1min 6s / 1min 38
    [   ***] (2 of 3) A start job is running for Avahi mDNS/DNS-SD Stack (1min 7s / 1min 38
    [    **] (2 of 3) A start job is running for Avahi mDNS/DNS-SD Stack (1min 7s / 1min 38
    [  *** ] (1 of 3) A start job is running for Name Service Cache Daemon (1min 9s / 1min 
    [ ***  ] (1 of 3) A start job is running for Name Service Cache Daemon (1min 10s / 1min
    [***   ] (1 of 3) A start job is running for Name Service Cache Daemon (1min 10s / 1min
    [**    ] (2 of 3) A start job is running for Avahi mDNS/DNS-SD Stack (1min 11s / 1min 3
    [*     ] (2 of 3) A start job is running for Avahi mDNS/DNS-SD Stack (1min 11s / 1min 3
    [**    ] (2 of 3) A start job is running for Avahi mDNS/DNS-SD Stack (1min 12s / 1min 3
    [***   ] (3 of 3) A start job is running for SuSEfirewall2 phase 1 (1min 12s / no limit
    [ ***  ] (3 of 3) A start job is running for SuSEfirewall2 phase 1 (1min 13s / no limit
    [  *** ] (3 of 3) A start job is running for SuSEfirewall2 phase 1 (1min 13s / no limit
    [   ***] (1 of 3) A start job is running for Name Service Cache Daemon (1min 14s / 1min
    [    **] (1 of 3) A start job is running for Name Service Cache Daemon (1min 14s / 1min
    [     *] (1 of 3) A start job is running for Name Service Cache Daemon (1min 15s / 1min
    [    **] (2 of 3) A start job is running for Avahi mDNS/DNS-SD Stack (1min 15s / 1min 3
    Maybe the nscd.service is the issue, it repeated often in boot.log and have a big time lapse in journalctl.
    Thanks again and best regards.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Podunk
    Posts
    26,864
    Blog Entries
    15

    Default Re: Opensuse Boot Time

    Hi
    How much space is being used by the journal?
    Code:
    journalctl --disk-usage
    journalctl -a|grep flushing [what is the last flushing entry]
    Are you using btrfs?
    Cheers Malcolm °¿° SUSE Knowledge Partner (Linux Counter #276890)
    SUSE SLE, openSUSE Leap/Tumbleweed (x86_64) | GNOME DE
    If you find this post helpful and are logged into the web interface,
    please show your appreciation and click on the star below... Thanks!

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Spain
    Posts
    25,547

    Default Re: Opensuse Boot Time

    On 2014-12-11 18:46, marcusvcl wrote:
    >
    > Hi,
    > I played around with journalctl --boot=ID and i found something that can
    > maybe give us a clue.
    > I tried to find some time's lapse in log, i don't know if i looked in
    > right place, but...
    > Here the pieces of result:


    No, nothing evident there, at least I can't see it. Let me try on my virtual test system, in order to experiment on the procedure.

    "journalctl -b" produces this, looking at the top:

    Code:
    -- Logs begin at Tue 2014-12-09 22:23:45 CET, end at Thu 2014-12-11 19:33:06 CET. --
    Dec 09 22:23:45 oS-13-2 systemd-journal[369]: Runtime journal is using 4.5M (max allo
    Dec 09 22:23:45 oS-13-2 systemd-journal[369]: Runtime journal is using 4.5M (max allo
    Dec 09 22:23:45 oS-13-2 kernel: Initializing cgroup subsys cpuset
    Dec 09 22:23:45 oS-13-2 kernel: Initializing cgroup subsys cpu
    Dec 09 22:23:45 oS-13-2 kernel: Initializing cgroup subsys cpuacct
    Dec 09 22:23:45 oS-13-2 kernel: Linux version 3.16.6-2-desktop (geeko@buildhost) (gcc
    The first line is the start of the current boot log. Now, from the critical path output we know:

    Code:
    NetworkManager.service @19.833s +1min 4.321s
    which means that the process was started 19.8 seconds after the boot start, and took more than 1 minute to end.

    Ok, so we repeat the journal request this way:

    Code:
    journalctl -b -o short-monotonic
    And we get:

    Code:
    -- Logs begin at Tue 2014-12-09 22:23:45 CET, end at Thu 2014-12-11 19:49:56 CET. --
    [    2.075470] oS-13-2 systemd-journal[369]: Runtime journal is using 4.5M (max allow
    [    2.075690] oS-13-2 systemd-journal[369]: Runtime journal is using 4.5M (max allow
    [    0.000000] oS-13-2 kernel: Initializing cgroup subsys cpuset
    [    0.000000] oS-13-2 kernel: Initializing cgroup subsys cpu
    [    0.000000] oS-13-2 kernel: Initializing cgroup subsys cpuacct
    [    0.000000] oS-13-2 kernel: Linux version 3.16.6-2-desktop (geeko@buildhost) (gcc
    [    0.000000] oS-13-2 kernel: Command line: BOOT_IMAGE=/vmlinuz-3.16.6-2-desktop roo
    [    0.000000] oS-13-2 kernel: Disabled fast string operations

    So you would have to page down 19 seconds later:


    Code:
    [    8.675172] oS-13-2 systemd[1]: Reached target Sound Card.
    [   18.103501] oS-13-2 systemd-cryptsetup[694]: Set cipher aes, mode xts-plain64, key
    [   19.345074] oS-13-2 kernel: NET: Registered protocol family 38
    You could post here the sequence of events, the log, since second 18 till, say, 100. Or rather upload to susepaste.org, for a month, not eternally, and we look at it.

    You see, my vmware machine also starts thinking about networking on the 19.3 second.

    Code:
    [   20.867271] oS-13-2 systemd[1]: Starting System Initialization.
    This entry, I think, signals that the kernel finishes and now it starts with services. Or something similar.

    Notice that there will be many things going on during that interval, but not all of them are that important, they don't "block".
    I also see the messages in mine about nscd. Not important.
    You will probably see errors in red, other important events in bold.

    In my case, network starts here:

    Code:
    [   22.947678] oS-13-2 kernel: NET: Registered protocol family 17
    [   22.814506] oS-13-2 systemd[1]: Started wicked DHCPv4 supplicant service.
    [   22.814771] oS-13-2 systemd[1]: Starting wicked network management service daemon.
    [   22.865678] oS-13-2 systemd[1]: Started wicked network management service daemon.
    [   22.865947] oS-13-2 systemd[1]: Starting wicked network nanny service...
    [   22.888681] oS-13-2 systemd[1]: Starting wicked managed network interfaces...
    [   23.105223] oS-13-2 kernel: No iBFT detected.
    [   23.142249] oS-13-2 kernel: e1000: eno1 NIC Link is Up 1000 Mbps Full Duplex, Flow

    This phase can be typically slow:


    Code:
    [   23.954719] oS-13-2 wickedd-dhcp4[1075]: eno1: Request to acquire DHCPv4 lease wit
    [   23.956580] oS-13-2 wickedd-dhcp6[1076]: eno1: Request to acquire DHCPv6 lease wit
    [   24.546801] oS-13-2 avahi-daemon[986]: Joining mDNS multicast group on interface e
    [   24.549197] oS-13-2 avahi-daemon[986]: New relevant interface eno1.IPv6 for mDNS.
    [   24.549751] oS-13-2 avahi-daemon[986]: Registering new address record for fe80::20
    [   24.728540] oS-13-2 wickedd-dhcp4[1075]: eno1: Committed DHCPv4 lease with address
    but this time it is not. That's the place I suggest you to look, around dhcp.


    Maybe you can also see the same messages with "dmesg".


    HTH! :-)


    --
    Cheers / Saludos,

    Carlos E. R.
    (from 13.1 x86_64 "Bottle" at Telcontar)

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Spain
    Posts
    25,547

    Default Re: Opensuse Boot Time

    On 2014-12-11 20:16, malcolmlewis wrote:
    >
    > Hi
    > How much space is being used by the journal?


    The info is in one of the log entries he posted:

    Code:
    Dez 11 08:32:08 Marcus systemd-journal[413]: Permanent journal is
    using 88.0M (max allowed 4.0G, trying to leave 4.0G free of 26.7G
    available → curren

    88MB. Then it took a minute to flush that to disk, but I would not
    expect that operation to block :-?

    --
    Cheers / Saludos,

    Carlos E. R.
    (from 13.1 x86_64 "Bottle" at Telcontar)

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Podunk
    Posts
    26,864
    Blog Entries
    15

    Default Re: Opensuse Boot Time

    On Thu 11 Dec 2014 07:35:06 PM CST, Carlos E. R. wrote:

    On 2014-12-11 20:16, malcolmlewis wrote:
    >
    > Hi
    > How much space is being used by the journal?


    The info is in one of the log entries he posted:

    Code:
    Dez 11 08:32:08 Marcus systemd-journal[413]: Permanent journal is
    using 88.0M (max allowed 4.0G, trying to leave 4.0G free of 26.7G
    available → curren

    88MB. Then it took a minute to flush that to disk, but I would not
    expect that operation to block :-?

    Hi
    I can make a difference, esp if lower spec hardware...

    A filefrag on the entries and maybe zero them out may improve in the
    interim and clear the way for investigating the other times...

    Code:
    grover:~ # filefrag /var/log/journal/016627c3c4784cd4812d4b7e96a34226/system.journal /var/log/journal/016627c3c4784cd4812d4b7e96a34226/system.journal:1671 extents found
    
    grover:~ # filefrag /var/log/journal/016627c3c4784cd4812d4b7e96a34226/user-1000.journal /var/log/journal/016627c3c4784cd4812d4b7e96a34226/user-1000.journal:186 extents found
    
    grover:~ # journalctl -a|grep flushing
    Dec 11 13:05:08 grover systemd-journal[383]: Time spent on flushing to /var is 7.178791s for 938 entries.
    
    grover:~ # journalctl --disk-usage
    Journals take up 32.0M on disk.
    
    grover:~ # echo > /var/log/journal/016627c3c4784cd4812d4b7e96a34226/user-1000.journal
    
    grover:~ # journalctl --disk-usage
    Journals take up 24.0M on disk.
    
    grover:~ # echo > /var/log/journal/016627c3c4784cd4812d4b7e96a34226/system.journal
    
    grover:~ # journalctl --disk-usage
    Journals take up 0B on disk.
    
    systemctl reboot
    Note the number under /var/log/journal will be different for the
    machine in question.

    Oh and probably nuking plymouth?

    --
    Cheers Malcolm °¿° LFCS, SUSE Knowledge Partner (Linux Counter #276890)
    SUSE Linux Enterprise Desktop 12 GNOME 3.10.1 Kernel 3.12.28-4-default
    If you find this post helpful and are logged into the web interface,
    please show your appreciation and click on the star below... Thanks!
    Last edited by malcolmlewis; 11-Dec-2014 at 14:51.

  10. #20

    Default Re: Opensuse Boot Time

    Hi Malcolm, thanks for the reply. Well, my journalctl --disk-usage returns:

    Code:
    Journals take up 80.1M on disk.
    And journalctl -a|grep flushing:

    Code:
    Dez 11 14:33:58 Marcus systemd-journal[408]: Time spent on flushing to /var is 1min 5.144624s for 915 entries.
    And yes, i'm using btrfs.

    About the other post, my spec is a i5-3230M, 8gb ram, 500gb HDD. And i got this results when using your examples:

    Code:
    filefrag /var/log/journal/d63d1aa3d98b4240b0d08aa7c6f9d4d0/system.journal
    /var/log/journal/d63d1aa3d98b4240b0d08aa7c6f9d4d0/system.journal: 13470 extents found
    filefrag /var/log/journal/d63d1aa3d98b4240b0d08aa7c6f9d4d0/user-1000.journal
    /var/log/journal/d63d1aa3d98b4240b0d08aa7c6f9d4d0/user-1000.journal: 1006 extents found

    ---

    Hi Carlos, using the journalctl -b -o short-monotonic and search for the 19sec, i got this result:

    Code:
    [   18.438533] Marcus kernel: Linux video capture interface: v2.00
    [   18.787227] Marcus kernel: uvcvideo: Found UVC 1.00 device HP Truevision HD (05c8:0348)
    [   18.798720] Marcus kernel: input: HP Truevision HD as /devices/pci0000:00/0000:00:1d.0/usb2/2-1/2-1.3/2-1.3:1.0/input/input14
    [   18.798826] Marcus kernel: usbcore: registered new interface driver uvcvideo
    [   18.798829] Marcus kernel: USB Video Class driver (1.1.1)
    [   18.746653] Marcus lvm[761]: WARNING: lvmetad is running but disabled. Restart lvmetad before enabling it!
    [   18.924735] Marcus lvm[765]: WARNING: lvmetad is running but disabled. Restart lvmetad before enabling it!
    [   20.378471] Marcus systemd-fsck[689]: /dev/sda4: clean, 48759/27762688 files, 28793404/111043840 blocks
    [   21.270243] Marcus kernel: EXT4-fs (sda4): mounted filesystem with ordered data mode. Opts: acl,user_xattr
    [   30.170159] Marcus systemd-journal[408]: Permanent journal is using 88.0M (max allowed 4.0G, trying to leave 4.0G free of 26.7G available → current
    [   95.315146] Marcus systemd-journal[408]: Time spent on flushing to /var is 1min 5.144624s for 915 entries.
    Thanks again for all the help here!

Page 2 of 6 FirstFirst 1234 ... LastLast

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •