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Thread: ssh to local machine fails unless tricked

  1. #11
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    Default Re: ssh to local machine fails unless tricked

    If you are using NetworkManager, then you will need to edit the settings for your ethernet connection. Otherwise, use:
    Yast --> Network Devices --> Network Settings
    and edit the settings for the ethernet device (give it a fixed IP address).
    I see Network Connections and Network Settings, when I go into Network Settings I now see a warning that

    Warning
    Network is currently handled by network manager or
    completely disabled YaST is unable to configure some options

    and I cannot edit the connection/device.

    When I go into Network Connections which appears to be

    Code:
    nm-connection-editor (1) - network connection editor for NetworkManager
    I have the options, without entering password, to choose

    Network Connections ---> Wired Connection 1 ---> EDIT ----> IPV4 Tab ---> Method, Automatic (DHCP), Automatic (DHCP) addresses only, Manual, Link Local Only, Shared to other computers, and Disabled.

    From this I gather that the computer is not designed to do something as ad-hoc as plugging in and replacing ethernet cables. This should have been obvious. If I am guessing right, I would choose Link Local Only if this was to be plugged into the raspberry pi and Automatic (DHCP) if it was to be connected to the internet. As you mentioned A router is what is indicated I here I think, or maybe a hub, although I was not intending to do that.

    thanks

    a5'

  2. #12
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    Default Re: ssh to local machine fails unless tricked

    Quote Originally Posted by a59303 View Post
    I see Network Connections and Network Settings, when I go into Network Settings I now see a warning that

    Warning
    Network is currently handled by network manager or
    completely disabled YaST is unable to configure some options

    and I cannot edit the connection/device.
    That's the default for laptops and probably machines that look like laptops to the installer.

    You can change that if you want. When in Yast Network Settings, go to the "Global Options" tab. There, you can change to using "ifup settings" (versions of opensuse up through 13.1) or "wicked service" (opensuse 13.2).

    I don't think you ever mentioned which version of opensuse you are running.

    Whether you should change is a different issue. Given your general unfamiliarity with networking, it might be best to put off that decision for a while.

    When I go into Network Connections which appears to be

    Code:
    nm-connection-editor (1) - network connection editor for NetworkManager
    I have the options, without entering password, to choose

    Network Connections ---> Wired Connection 1 ---> EDIT ----> IPV4 Tab ---> Method, Automatic (DHCP), Automatic (DHCP) addresses only, Manual, Link Local Only, Shared to other computers, and Disabled.
    If you choose "Manual", you should be able to specify an IP address, such as the static IP assigned by your ISP.

    From this I gather that the computer is not designed to do something as ad-hoc as plugging in and replacing ethernet cables.
    NetworkManager is designed for the needs of laptops. And they are used in a way that depends on plugging or unplugging ethernet cables or connecting to WiFi networks.

    This should have been obvious. If I am guessing right, I would choose Link Local Only if this was to be plugged into the raspberry pi and Automatic (DHCP) if it was to be connected to the internet. As you mentioned A router is what is indicated I here I think, or maybe a hub, although I was not intending to do that.
    If you have a static IP assigned by your ISP, then use manual and specify that IP address.

    Let's talk a little about hardware.

    A switch: At one time, people use hubs. These days we use switches which do roughly the same job but do it better.

    With a switch, you would connect the switch to your modem. Then you would connect each computer to the switch.

    From the point of view of a computer, this is pretty much the same as directly connecting the computer to the modem, except that if there are two or more computers they are also connected to each other. That would already make life easier for you.

    A router: Here, I am talking of a home router, not a large router such as your ISP might have. The home routers are designed to allow several computers to share a network connection, when your ISP has set things up for you to have only one device. The router makes itself the one device that your ISP thinks you have. And then it allows multiple devices to share that connection by using what is called "IP masquerading" or NAT (network address translation) or NAPT (network address and port translation). The router typically has a built-in switch to allow up to 4 devices to directly connect. You can add an additional switch to connect more.

    Either a switch or a home router would help you with your setup. I recommend a router, though it may look a tad more complex to setup. You can get an idea of prices by browsing to Amazon or NewEgg or other online computer store.

    An additional note. Many routers come with software to setup under Windows. You do not need that software and you do not need to be running Windows. You can set it up with a web browser. And you can ask on this forum, if you need help setting it up. Usually it will work out of the box, and you only need to go into setup to do non-standard things (such as making your RPI a server).
    openSUSE Leap 15.1; KDE Plasma 5;

  3. #13
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    Default Re: ssh to local machine fails unless tricked

    OK,

    xw6200
    openSUSE 13.2 (Harlequin) (x86_64) 64-bit
    Gnome Version 3.14.1

    RPi
    FreeBSD 10.1

    Modem
    Motorola Surfboard SB6141

    --------------


    If you choose "Manual", you should be able to specify an IP address, such as the static IP assigned by your ISP.
    Yes, I understand, I am trying to fix a problem with the Pi, so I needed to access it locally. I am not sure how I was going to go about having access to the internet from both computers. I had a reasonable concept of hubs, and routers. I was not aware that one could buy a switch.


    If you have a static IP assigned by your ISP, then use manual and specify that IP address.
    That is manual in Network Manager. OK. Again though, not sure about how I am going to go about this and I was only trying to temporarily access the raspberry pi through ssh.

    thanks,

    a5'

  4. #14
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    Default Re: ssh to local machine fails unless tricked

    Quote Originally Posted by a59303 View Post
    Yes, I understand, I am trying to fix a problem with the Pi, so I needed to access it locally.
    Right. And you had problems with that, because it needed an IP address (on both systems) in order to communicate.

    You can actually just make up IP addresses to use (of the form n.n.n.n where each "n" is an 8-bit number). Have the two computers agree in all but the last of those numbers and they will be able to communicate.

    A made up IP only becomes a problem when you connect to the Internet, because you might have made up an IP that properly is used in Australia or Japan or wherever.

    IP addresses that begin 192.168. are safe to use at home. That range is reserved for private networks, so they will never conflict.

    What a router would do, is make up those two IP addresses for you, and allow you to request them with DHCP (which your computers are probably already trying to do).
    openSUSE Leap 15.1; KDE Plasma 5;

  5. #15
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    Default Re: ssh to local machine fails unless tricked

    Quote Originally Posted by nrickert View Post
    Right. And you had problems with that, because it needed an IP address (on both systems) in order to communicate.

    You can actually just make up IP addresses to use (of the form n.n.n.n where each "n" is an 8-bit number). Have the two computers agree in all but the last of those numbers and they will be able to communicate.

    A made up IP only becomes a problem when you connect to the Internet, because you might have made up an IP that properly is used in Australia or Japan or wherever.

    IP addresses that begin 192.168. are safe to use at home. That range is reserved for private networks, so they will never conflict.

    What a router would do, is make up those two IP addresses for you, and allow you to request them with DHCP (which your computers are probably already trying to do).
    Yes, and that is exactly what I saw going on, in fact in the info that I posted early on. The Pi has taken up the 77.44.113.89 while the xw6200 has 77.44.113.83. I am interested in understanding this, which is one of the reasons I don't really want to buy a router. I was thinking that it is possible with what I have. I think I set the RPi to have that IP and then the xw6200 assumed that it could take the other one. Have to read some stuff about this now.

    Thanks,

    a5'

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