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Thread: Break (ctrl+c) application from a Screen terminal

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    The Netherlands
    Posts
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    Default Break (ctrl+c) application from a Screen terminal

    Hi,

    I am using the Screen tool/application on my Diaspora* server so that the Diaspora* screen output gets send to a Screen terminal that I can take over from any SSH connection I make in the future with screen -r. This works, but I seem to have one problem. Normally you can quit the Diaspora* server script by pressing ctrl+c. Now that I started the script from a Screen terminal, the ctrl+c combination doesn't seem to be working. Of course there are other ways to kill the Diaspora* server, but that leads to more work and that is just not acceptable :-)

    After some Googling I found more people on other distro's with the same problem. For some other key combinations did the trick.

    Is there a way to do this and is this really a distro thing or is this Screen working as designed?

  2. #2

    Default Re: Break (ctrl+c) application from a Screen terminal

    I've never noticed that, and I use screen a lot, but perhaps you're on a
    different version of openSUSE or screen than I am. You could also try
    Ctrl+d, or of course any of the other methods to kill something (`pkill
    diapora or `kill $(pgrep diapora)` or whatever).

    --
    Good luck.

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  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    The Netherlands
    Posts
    249

    Default Re: Break (ctrl+c) application from a Screen terminal

    Thanks for you time. Perhaps it's a Diaspora thing then. When I kill the screen and the process that was started within it, Diaspora keeps running

  4. #4

    Default Re: Break (ctrl+c) application from a Screen terminal

    Server scripts often start as daemon processes; as a result it may not be
    attached to your screen session, which would explain why Ctrl+c does not
    work on it. The same thing happens with most services on Linux whether
    Apache httpd, Postfix, your SSH service which you use to access the
    system, etc. You start them, but they run as daemons because they are
    meant to persist much longer, or entirely outside of, any single login
    session or terminal.

    --
    Good luck.

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    show your appreciation and click on the star below...

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