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Thread: How to resize a SuSE installation?

  1. #1

    Default How to resize a SuSE installation?

    Hi Folks--

    Thanks in advance.

    I have an older laptop that I put 13.1 onto. I later installed another distro onto it (Lubuntu). I'd like to erase Lubuntu and use all of the HDD space for SuSE. I have already downloaded Gparted. Are there any gotchas I need to look out for? I plan to simply just expand the root partition; do I need to do anything else? Is it a straightforward process?

    Again, TIA.

  2. #2
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    Default Re: How to resize a SuSE installation?

    On 2014-06-11 04:26, jerryb1961 wrote:

    > I have an older laptop that I put 13.1 onto. I later installed another
    > distro onto it (Lubuntu). I'd like to erase Lubuntu and use all of the
    > HDD space for SuSE. I have already downloaded Gparted. Are there any
    > gotchas I need to look out for? I plan to simply just expand the root
    > partition; do I need to do anything else? Is it a straightforward
    > process?


    It depends on the order of partitions. They have to be contiguous in
    order to expand one.

    Please paste here the output of "fdisk -l" so that we can advice better.
    And please do so inside code tags (the '#' button in the forum editor).
    See photo


    If not, there are other possibilities, like using it for /usr.

    --
    Cheers / Saludos,

    Carlos E. R.
    (from 13.1 x86_64 "Bottle" at Telcontar)

  3. #3

    Default Re: How to resize a SuSE installation?

    Here it is:

    Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
    /dev/sda1 * 2048 40236422 20117187+ 83 Linux
    /dev/sda2 73947136 78139391 2096128 82 Linux swap / Solaris
    /dev/sda3 40237054 73947135 16855041 5 Extended
    /dev/sda5 40237056 73947135 16855040 83 Linux


    I hope this is merely a matter of expanding sda1, but the swapper is in the way...?


    What if I expand it and create a new swap file?

    Gawd, it's late and I'm tired. I'll pick this up again in the morning. :-)

  4. #4
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    Default Re: How to resize a SuSE installation?

    Quote Originally Posted by jerryb1961 View Post
    Here it is:

    Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
    /dev/sda1 * 2048 40236422 20117187+ 83 Linux
    /dev/sda2 73947136 78139391 2096128 82 Linux swap / Solaris
    /dev/sda3 40237054 73947135 16855041 5 Extended
    /dev/sda5 40237056 73947135 16855040 83 Linux


    I hope this is merely a matter of expanding sda1, but the swapper is in the way...?


    What if I expand it and create a new swap file?

    Gawd, it's late and I'm tired. I'll pick this up again in the morning. :-)
    You can delete sda5 and sda3 and sda2 and apply
    Now shrink from the right a small swap partition, which should again become sda2, apply

    FYI: You should be sure to make backups of anything important before you do work like this.

    *You may need to swapoff on sda2 before you can do this, as gparted may use it by default.

    Hopefully your device-map and fstab will not need editing
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  5. #5
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    Default Re: How to resize a SuSE installation?

    jerryb1961 wrote:

    >
    > Here it is:
    >
    > Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
    > /dev/sda1 * 2048 40236422 20117187+ 83 Linux
    > /dev/sda2 73947136 78139391 2096128 82 Linux swap /
    > Solaris
    > /dev/sda3 40237054 73947135 16855041 5 Extended
    > /dev/sda5 40237056 73947135 16855040 83 Linux


    You forgot to add code tags.

    Code:
    
    > Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System
    > /dev/sda1   *        2048    40236422    20117187+  83  Linux
    > /dev/sda2        73947136    78139391     2096128   82  Linux swap /
    > Solaris
    > /dev/sda3        40237054    73947135    16855041    5  Extended
    > /dev/sda5        40237056    73947135    16855040   83  Linux

    > I hope this is merely a matter of expanding sda1, but the swapper is in
    > the way...?
    >
    >
    > What if I expand it and create a new swap file?


    That's one way.

    You would have to delete the swap, then sda5 and sda3. /Then/ you can expand
    sda1, and add again a new sap partition (you will have to adjust fstab to
    refer to it).


    Or, you can /simply/ mount sda5 as "/home".

    * Install 'mc', midnight commander. It is in the standard repo.
    * Use the yast partitioner module, to mount /dev/sda5 to /newhome. Or
    manually if you know how, much faster.
    * If you wish, you can instead remove both sda3 and sda5, and create new
    sda3 in any Linux format you wish. I suggest XFS, mounted to "/newhome".

    * Log out.
    * Pres ctrl-alt-f1, to switch to text mode.
    * Log in as root in there (no, don't log in as user, then su. Absurd in
    this case, and will break (we will move home)).
    * Enter command "init 3". This will stop the graphical mode.
    * Rename directory "/home" to "/oldhome"
    * umount /newhome
    * Edit /etc/fstab using 'mcedit' or 'mc' browser. Change the line you
    created for sda5 to "/home" instead of "/newhome".
    * rename "/newhome" to "/home"
    * mount "/home"
    * Verify that it is mounted (output of "df -h" and "mount".

    At this point, you have a new "/home" partition, but empty. Let's fill it.

    * Start 'mc'. You will see two file panes, left and right. Move from one to
    the other with "tab" key. On the left one, navigate to directory "/oldhome"
    (should have all your old files). On the right one, navigate to directory
    "/home" (should be empty).
    * On the left side, mark all files and directories. Press the '*' key on
    numeric keypad to select all files in one go, then use the "ins" key to
    select directories. When all are selected, press the "F5" key to copy from
    the active panel - watch out, in text mode console the F keys might not work
    properly. It will pop a dialog with what it is going to do, and you can
    change manually or abort. Make sure that preserve permissions is active.
    * Copy process will copy everything from your old home to the new one, on a
    partition this time.
    * You can use the menu "command / show directory sizes" to calculate the
    sizes of all directories in the active pane. Do it for both panes, and
    compare sizes: they should be the same. If not, something was not copied.
    * When finished, exit 'mc'.
    * Switch to another console, by using Alt-f2..6, and try login as user.
    Start 'mc' and verify that your files are there. Try viewing a file (F3) to
    verify that you can actually open a file (correct permissions).
    * If correct, go back to tty 1, and enter command "init 5" to restart
    graphical mode.

    Business as usual, with a new partition for home.

    Once verified, remove directory "/oldhome".

    Remember that you still have two console sessions. You can go there by
    pressing [Ctrl][Alt][F1]

    Done. Much safer than growing partitions. And you should have a separate
    /home partition, anyway.

    --
    Cheers / Saludos,

    Carlos E. R.
    (from 13.1 x86_64 "Bottle" at Telcontar)

  6. #6

    Default Re: How to resize a SuSE installation?

    Thanks! To everyone!

    It turned out my swap partition was at the end of the disk, so resizing was a breeze.

    All I need to do now is get rid of the Lubuntu entries in grub's menu.lst.

    This whole thing turned out to be easy. Thanks again.

  7. #7

    Smile Re: How to resize a SuSE installation?

    Quote Originally Posted by jerryb1961 View Post
    Thanks! To everyone!

    It turned out my swap partition was at the end of the disk, so resizing was a breeze.

    All I need to do now is get rid of the Lubuntu entries in grub's menu.lst.

    This whole thing turned out to be easy. Thanks again.

    To expand (that's a pun, by the way) on what happened, I had assumed on the basis of the fdisk output that the swapper was between SuSE and Lubuntu:

    Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
    /dev/sda1 * 2048 40236422 20117187+ 83 Linux
    /dev/sda2 73947136 78139391 2096128 82 Linux swap / Solaris
    /dev/sda3 40237054 73947135 16855041 5 Extended
    /dev/sda5 40237056 73947135 16855040 83 Linux

    But I didn't pay attention to the block start/end.

    Anyway, everything's hunky-dory now. I bought this laptop (Averatec 3200 series) in 2004. It's got some quirky hardware and even installing Linux almost had to be done with a crowbar, mainly because of the Unichrome video chipset; I did a text-based network install of SuSE. The openchrome driver works fine (http://software.opensuse.org/package...deo-openchrome) though. I gave up on trying to get the internal wireless to work but got a Belkin F7D2101 to work using the instructions at http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=1515747

    So I've been able to breathe new life into this old laptop. Running LXDE it's faster than it was running XP.

  8. #8
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    Default Re: How to resize a SuSE installation?

    On 06/11/2014 10:26 AM, jerryb1961 wrote:
    >
    > jerryb1961;2648487 Wrote:
    >> Thanks! To everyone!
    >>
    >> It turned out my swap partition was at the end of the disk, so resizing
    >> was a breeze.
    >>
    >> All I need to do now is get rid of the Lubuntu entries in grub's
    >> menu.lst.
    >>
    >> This whole thing turned out to be easy. Thanks again.

    >
    >
    > To expand (that's a pun, by the way) on what happened, I had assumed on
    > the basis of the fdisk output that the swapper was between SuSE and
    > Lubuntu:
    >
    > Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
    > /dev/sda1 * 2048 40236422 20117187+ 83 Linux
    > /dev/sda2 73947136 78139391 2096128 82 Linux swap /
    > Solaris
    > /dev/sda3 40237054 73947135 16855041 5 Extended
    > /dev/sda5 40237056 73947135 16855040 83 Linux
    >
    > But I didn't pay attention to the block start/end.


    This is yet another reason to keep the partitions in disk order. If the swap had
    been /dev/sda6, the confusion would have been avoided.

    I remember some utility that used to warn you when the partitions were not in
    disk order, but I'm not sure what it was.


  9. #9
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    Default Re: How to resize a SuSE installation?

    On 2014-06-11 17:54, Larry Finger wrote:
    > On 06/11/2014 10:26 AM, jerryb1961 wrote:



    > This is yet another reason to keep the partitions in disk order. If the
    > swap had been /dev/sda6, the confusion would have been avoided.


    I should have noticed. I forget to check.


    > I remember some utility that used to warn you when the partitions were
    > not in disk order, but I'm not sure what it was.


    Fdisk does. But the OP did not paste the full text of the "fdisk -l"
    command run, so we could not see if it was there.

    I forgot to explicitly ask for the full text, but anyway, he also forgot
    to use code tags, as requested ;-)

    --
    Cheers / Saludos,

    Carlos E. R.
    (from 13.1 x86_64 "Bottle" at Telcontar)

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