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Thread: import package list

  1. #1

    Default import package list

    I'm upgrading from 12.3 to 13.1. I'm also upgrading my hard drive so I can't do an online upgrade. I had previously exported a list of all the installed (12.3) packages from Yast2 - Software Management. I did a "standard" install of 13.1 to the new hard drive, no additional packages, and then tried to import my installed package list from 12.3 into 13.1 to get back to my previous environment - only 13.1 marked all the packages for deletion. How can I get all the packages I previously had installed in 12.3 installed into 13.1 without having to add them one by one?

  2. #2
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    Default Re: import package list

    As you do not explain how you made that list, nor anything of how it looks like, I can only speculate. But probably the version indications are part of the package names. And for 13.1 there will most probably be newer versions for most packages. Thus editing the file with the list of packages, removing the versions and then doing zypper in on every of them might be a solution.

    But it will not help e.g. when packages changed names, where merged, or otherwise reorganised between the two openSUSE versions.
    Henk van Velden

  3. #3
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    Default Re: import package list

    On 2014-04-24 17:46, hcvv wrote:
    >
    > As you do not explain how you made that list, nor anything of how it
    > looks like, I can only speculate.


    Yes, he did say it :-)

    >> I had previously exported a list of all the
    >> installed (12.3) packages from Yast2 - Software Management.


    In 13.1, yast sw-single QT flavour, it is in the "File" menu, and it is
    called "export". The default file name is "user-packages.xml", and it
    is, of course, an XML file.

    Mine has this appeareance:

    Code:
    
    > <?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
    > <syscontent>
    >   <ident>
    >     <name></name>
    >     <version epoch="0"/>
    >     <description></description>
    >     <created>1398370745</created>
    >   </ident>
    >   <onsys>
    >     <entry kind="package" name="zypper-log" epoch="0" ver="1.9.12" rel="16.1" arch="noarch"/>
    >     <entry kind="package" name="yast2-nfs-server" epoch="0" ver="3.0.0" rel="2.1.4" arch="noarch"/>
    >     <entry kind="package" name="yast2-nfs-common" epoch="0" ver="3.0.0" rel="2.1.4" arch="noarch"/>
    >     <entry kind="package" name="yast2-nfs-client" epoch="0" ver="3.0.2" rel="1.3" arch="noarch"/>
    >     <entry kind="package" name="yast2-network" epoch="0" ver="3.0.8" rel="5.1" arch="x86_64"/>
    
    ....
    YaST has, of course, a corresponding "import" menu entry.

    > But probably the version indications
    > are part of the package names. And for 13.1 there will most probably be
    > newer versions for most packages. Thus editing the file with the list of
    > packages, removing the versions and then doing zypper in on every of
    > them might be a solution.


    As you see, editing the file is not that easy, you need something that
    can parse XML and pull out just the "name=" entries.


    > But it will not help e.g. when packages changed names, where merged, or
    > otherwise reorganised between the two openSUSE versions.


    Yes, that's a problem.

    That, and that the file specifies versions. On the other hand, it does
    not mention repo of origin, so recreating an install using the proper
    packman packages, say, is quite difficult.


    The feature needs some developer care.


    If I had to do it (as admin, not dev), I would first create the list
    using plain rpm command, with some concoction to get the appropriate
    fields printed, and then use some script to generate an appropriate
    zypper concoction to install that list of packages - more or less. And
    I'm not confident on getting it right.


    --
    Cheers / Saludos,

    Carlos E. R.
    (from 13.1 x86_64 "Bottle" at Telcontar)

  4. #4
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    Default Re: import package list

    Well, wouldn't it have been nice if the OP had told what you now told. Why expecting that others are doing this more or less every day and thus will understand immediatly what is done and what are the results?

    In any case, thanks for finding out what the OP most probably did and for posting that.

    I guess that that functionality is designed to make a sort of backup of the present state of the system (with respect to installed pakages), to be able to restore that situation after e.g. a disk crash and a new installation.

    And when it is designed for that purpose, it will by design not serve the purpose asked for by the OP. I am not sure that this needs "some developer care" because it most probably does where it is made for.

    In my post above, I already pointed to some basic problems that are to be taken care of when trying do do this more or less automatic. When packages have a new names and/or dependancy structure in the new openSUSE version, there is no automatic way to do this.

    The way Carlos points to (customised rpm listing and intelligent editing and intelligent uasge of the results) is as near as you can get I am afraid.
    Henk van Velden

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    Default Re: import package list

    So, would a feature like this be something that could be added to, or in conjunction with zypper dup? Although the issues hcvv brought up about renaming or merged.

    Although I wonder if it captures top level application names and let the system on-the-fly determine dependencies, if that might change from release to release?
    "Linux provides freedom, problem is most users don't know what it is or how to use it." ~me
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  6. #6
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    Default Re: import package list

    On 2014-04-25 09:46, hcvv wrote:
    >
    > Well, wouldn't it have been nice if the OP had told what you now told.
    > Why expecting that others are doing this more or less every day and thus
    > will understand immediatly what is done and what are the results?
    >
    > In any case, thanks for finding out what the OP most probably did and
    > for posting that.


    Welcome :-)

    I happened to look at that feature some time ago, so I knew. But that's
    to be expected, some of us are familiar with some applications and some
    of their features, and other people with a different set.

    > I guess that that functionality is designed to make a sort of backup of
    > the present state of the system (with respect to installed pakages), to
    > be able to restore that situation after e.g. a disk crash and a new
    > installation.


    Yep.
    Probably combined with autoyast.

    > And when it is designed for that purpose, it will by design not serve
    > the purpose asked for by the OP. I am not sure that this needs "some
    > developer care" because it most probably does where it is made for.


    Actually, it also fails for restore of a system, because it does not
    have repository information. The feature only works if you have the
    official default repositories, I'm afraid. It might have been designed
    when there were no repos.


    > In my post above, I already pointed to some basic problems that are to
    > be taken care of when trying do do this more or less automatic. When
    > packages have a new names and/or dependancy structure in the new
    > openSUSE version, there is no automatic way to do this.


    No, and yes. The system can ask the user. This is what the offline
    upgrade procedure does, when upgrading a system to a newer release (boot
    from the DVD, choose upgrade).


    > The way Carlos points to (customised rpm listing and intelligent editing
    > and intelligent uasge of the results) is as near as you can get I am
    > afraid.


    Another method that just occurred to me is to clone the original
    installation on the other computer, and then upgrade it.

    And another is to play with autoyast. I'm not familiar with it in order
    to know if it is feasible, or this exported yast list is actually what
    autoyast uses. Or, instead of the export feature, use the "system
    backup" method. It does generate an autoyast profile, I understand. But
    I've never used it for this purpose. It should work in order to
    replicate the source installation, which then would have to be upgraded
    to the newer release.

    And I have my reservations about how it handles multiple repos - I
    suspect it doesn't handle the situation at all.

    --
    Cheers / Saludos,

    Carlos E. R.
    (from 13.1 x86_64 "Bottle" at Telcontar)

  7. #7

    Default Re: import package list

    Thank you all for your responses, but let me pose the problem a different way ... how did you upgrade your system before the online upgrade feature became available? (I'm assuming that at least some of you were using openSUSE prior to 12.0) After the installation was complete did you go into Yast's Software Management, scroll through the RPM groups and patterns, and add packages one by one? Or was there another way to get all the packages you had installed in the previous version installed in the new version? (And yes, I am aware of the problem posed by apps being merged, renamed, or discontinued ... but what of all the packages that weren't?)

  8. #8
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    Default Re: import package list

    Quote Originally Posted by pmmt View Post
    Thank you all for your responses, but let me pose the problem a different way ... how did you upgrade your system before the online upgrade feature became available? (I'm assuming that at least some of you were using openSUSE prior to 12.0) After the installation was complete did you go into Yast's Software Management, scroll through the RPM groups and patterns, and add packages one by one? Or was there another way to get all the packages you had installed in the previous version installed in the new version? (And yes, I am aware of the problem posed by apps being merged, renamed, or discontinued ... but what of all the packages that weren't?)
    How did we upgrade?

    I usually end up doing a clean install (/home is a separate partition) and manually re-adding the applications. The benefit of this is I can decide whether to add back some packages that I may not use, or hold off installing something until I feel I need it. The down-side is that I can (easily) forget some things (but then again, if it is truly important, I should notice something missing through the normal course of my workflow).
    "Linux provides freedom, problem is most users don't know what it is or how to use it." ~me
    Friends don't let Friends wear red shirts on away parties!
    Linux User #477531 | Danbury Area Computer Society (www.dacs.org)

  9. #9
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    Default Re: import package list

    On 2014-04-25 15:56, pmmt wrote:
    >
    > Thank you all for your responses, but let me pose the problem a
    > different way ... how did you upgrade your system before the online
    > upgrade feature became available?


    Using the offline upgrade feature ;-)

    Offline upgrade
    method


    > (I'm assuming that at least some of
    > you were using openSUSE prior to 12.0)


    Indeed. 5.3. This system has been upgraded from there, in steps, and
    with hiccups and hardware migrations.

    > After the installation was
    > complete did you go into Yast's Software Management, scroll through the
    > RPM groups and patterns, and add packages one by one? Or was there
    > another way to get all the packages you had installed in the previous
    > version installed in the new version? (And yes, I am aware of the
    > problem posed by apps being merged, renamed, or discontinued ... but
    > what of all the packages that weren't?)


    The method I use is clone the system, boot it, check hardware changes,
    then upgrade it. After that, apply the multimedia procedure as usual,
    and add extra repos as needed.

    --
    Cheers / Saludos,

    Carlos E. R.
    (from 13.1 x86_64 "Bottle" at Telcontar)

  10. #10
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    Default Re: import package list

    On 2014-04-25 16:26, dragonbite wrote:

    > How did we upgrade?
    >
    > I usually end up doing a clean install (/home is a separate partition)
    > and manually re-adding the applications.


    Many did that. But it is a chore to have to re-add manually all the
    applications and services you had in the previous version, instead of
    being able to import a list automatically, or at lest semi automatically.

    The possibilities would be:

    · non existing package.
    · package available on several repos, choose one.
    · postpone package dependency solving (not ignore, postpone).
    Reason: the conflict can solve itself when adding another
    package further down in the list.

    And you have to be able to stop, add new repos, postpone decision in
    order to think or ask in forum...

    --
    Cheers / Saludos,

    Carlos E. R.
    (from 13.1 x86_64 "Bottle" at Telcontar)

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