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Thread: log files autostart scripts LXDE

  1. #1
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    Default log files autostart scripts LXDE

    Opensuse 12.3 LXDE

    I have made a view start up shell scripts and let them start by a .desktop filename in my ~/.config/autostart directory.
    How can I see if something is going wrong when a script is not starting well.
    Where to find the log file ?

  2. #2
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    Default Re: log files autostart scripts LXDE

    Hi
    Unless your scripts have some logger commands or echo the output to a file, then you need to start them in a terminal to see what is happening.
    Cheers Malcolm °¿° SUSE Knowledge Partner (Linux Counter #276890)
    SUSE SLE, openSUSE Leap/Tumbleweed (x86_64) | GNOME DE
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    please show your appreciation and click on the star below... Thanks!

  3. #3
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    Default Re: log files autostart scripts LXDE

    Ok thanks.

  4. #4
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    Default Re: log files autostart scripts LXDE

    If you start your scripts by embedding them in the systemd Unit files, then I'd expect that any errors might show up in your regular syslog (and journal).

    For starters, without knowing when your logfiles might best be started (I assume you just chose your Desktop startup for its convenience), you should instead take a look at the various bootup Unit files
    Code:
    systemctl --type target
    Each Unit file controls a particular step in the booting process. The "Graphical" target is just before the Desktop starts to load. The "multi-user" target is when the machine is still running in text-only mode. Note there are targets for network, timers (which is similar to cron), fs (file system) and more. So, you have a lot of choices to invoke your script, merely by copying the Unit file to /etc/systemd/system and editing the file to either invoke your script directly or through another custom Unit file that calls your script (preferred, which in turn can make your script a "service").

    HTH,
    TSU

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