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Thread: Boot to terminal in 13.1

  1. #1

    Default Boot to terminal in 13.1

    I build a new machine for my MythTV backend. It's got a Radeon video card built in. I tried using that, but I was having all kinds of trouble with the graphics. So I uninstalled the radeon drivers that were installed by default and shut it down. I installed an old GeForce 7300 card and tried to reboot it to install the drivers. The problem is that when it boots, it goes to the black screen and the monitors stops seeing the computer (monitor light goes amber). So I figured I'd boot to runlevel 3. The problem is that in 13.1, or maybe with my puny monitor, I don't have an option line at the bottom the enter the runlevel. All I have is:
    OpenSUSE 13.1
    Advanced options for OpenSUSE.

    I installed via a USB stick, but I can't use that to change the boot options. If that's in and I get to the install menu, when I try to "Boot to hard drive", the machine beeps and reloads the install menu. That's a different issue though, and I don't care about it.

    I'm trying to figure out how to get my machine to boot to runlevel 3. Any suggestions?

    BTW, I'm using an old flatscreen (4:3), and I think it's defaulting to 800x600. So the option line may be there, but I can't see it or navigate to it.

  2. #2

    Default Re: Boot to terminal in 13.1

    My plan is to boot to runlevel 3 so I can install the NVIDIA drivers.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Spain
    Posts
    25,547

    Default Re: Boot to terminal in 13.1

    On 2014-02-20 21:46, Yippee38 wrote:
    > So I figured I'd boot
    > to runlevel 3. The problem is that in 13.1, or maybe with my puny
    > monitor, I don't have an option line at the bottom the enter the
    > runlevel. All I have is:
    > OpenSUSE 13.1
    > Advanced options for OpenSUSE.


    Press 'e' for edit. Find the line starting with "linux". Add a '3' at
    the end of it. Accept and boot.

    From memory.

    --
    Cheers / Saludos,

    Carlos E. R.

    (from 13.1 x86_64 "Bottle" (Minas Tirith))

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    Kamloops, BC, Canada
    Posts
    4,029

    Default Re: Boot to terminal in 13.1

    Quote Originally Posted by Yippee38 View Post
    I build a new machine for my MythTV backend. It's got a Radeon video card built in. I tried using that, but I was having all kinds of trouble with the graphics. So I uninstalled the radeon drivers that were installed by default and shut it down. I installed an old GeForce 7300 card and tried to reboot it to install the drivers. The problem is that when it boots, it goes to the black screen and the monitors stops seeing the computer (monitor light goes amber). So I figured I'd boot to runlevel 3. The problem is that in 13.1, or maybe with my puny monitor, I don't have an option line at the bottom the enter the runlevel. All I have is:
    OpenSUSE 13.1
    Advanced options for OpenSUSE.
    Instead, go to Advanced options, then choose Recovery mode (2nd line, I believe).

    This should boot you up into openSUSE, where you can install the appropriate nVidia driver for the card using Yast, in your case the G02 version, I believe.

    That should do it.
    "Take a Walk on a Sunny Day, Greet everyone along the way, and Make Somebody Smile, Today"
    Gerry Jack Macks"Walk On A Sunny Day" GerryJackMacks.net

  5. #5

    Default Re: Boot to terminal in 13.1

    Quote Originally Posted by Fraser_Bell View Post
    Instead, go to Advanced options, then choose Recovery mode (2nd line, I believe).

    This should boot you up into openSUSE, where you can install the appropriate nVidia driver for the card using Yast, in your case the G02 version, I believe.

    That should do it.
    Second line works, but when I go into software, it shows the nouveau drivers already installed. I'll try both methods though.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    Kamloops, BC, Canada
    Posts
    4,029

    Default Re: Boot to terminal in 13.1

    Quote Originally Posted by Yippee38 View Post
    Second line works, but when I go into software, it shows the nouveau drivers already installed. I'll try both methods though.
    Yes, and the nouveau drivers are not the ones you want.

    You want the proprietary nVidia drivers from the openSUSE repos.
    "Take a Walk on a Sunny Day, Greet everyone along the way, and Make Somebody Smile, Today"
    Gerry Jack Macks"Walk On A Sunny Day" GerryJackMacks.net

  7. #7

    Default Re: Boot to terminal in 13.1

    Quote Originally Posted by Fraser_Bell View Post
    Yes, and the nouveau drivers are not the ones you want.

    You want the proprietary nVidia drivers from the openSUSE repos.
    Yeah. I know. The nouveau drivers were installed by default.

    I screwed something up and now it won't boot.

    I tried re-installing from scratch since I haven't done anything with the system. I keep getting a "doesn't support dpo or fua" message and I can't do anything from there. Not sure what to do now.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
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    Kamloops, BC, Canada
    Posts
    4,029

    Default Re: Boot to terminal in 13.1

    Quote Originally Posted by Yippee38 View Post
    Yeah. I know. The nouveau drivers were installed by default.

    I screwed something up and now it won't boot.

    I tried re-installing from scratch since I haven't done anything with the system. I keep getting a "doesn't support dpo or fua" message and I can't do anything from there. Not sure what to do now.
    Okay.

    That message can pop up when a filesystem requests a force unit access.

    Let's start again, but clean. I am assuming this is no dual-boot setup, and nothing on the disk is important at this point.

    If that is correct, let's clear the disk.

    Before proceeding, please read this entire post.

    Boot with the install key. 3rd item down should be "Rescue System". Click on that and wait for it to load.

    It will stop with the line

    Rescue login:

    Type (without the quotes) "root" then press Enter.

    You will now see the prompt, probably in a red font:

    Rescue:~#

    Do
    Code:
    fdisk -l
    This will list your drives and partitions. Double-check which is the drive that you want to install on to make certain you will be using the right drive and right partitions when you run commands on the disk.

    I suspect it will be sda, but please be sure. You are about to blow the partitions away.

    Do
    Code:
    parted
    You will now have a prompt:
    (parted)

    Do
    Code:
    select /dev/sda
    (Whether you select /dev/sda or sdb depends on which drive you determined it to be when you ran fdisk above. Where I put sda in these commands, you put whatever matches the drive you are installing to.)

    Do
    Code:
    mklabel msdos
    You have no partitions, now. When this command is confirmed, do
    Code:
    quit
    You will be back at the Rescue:~# prompt.

    Do
    Code:
    reboot
    And start the openSUSE installation, creating and formatting new partitions.

    (Tip: Choose to use a different password for root than for user, that is when setting your user password deselect "Use this password for system administrator", and deselect "Automatic Login". This is much more secure, and one day you will probably be glad you did it this way. You can select "Receive System Mail".)

    Also, do not do any updates during the install, choose to skip updates, leave them for afterwards.

    Once it is installing the packages, do not disappear. When it gets to about 80%, watch for the first reboot.

    On first reboot (if you recall, there is still some setup to go), you will want to choose the Boot from HD option.

    When you get to the Grub menu, go to the Advanced options and choose the Recovery mode. This will not cause any problems with the installation, but when it gets to the login screen after the final setup, you will be in a graphics mode that will allow you to login to KDE and do some additional setup. Do not log in as root, but as your User.

    Once in there, start by launching Yast (it will ask for the root password), then choose Online Update. Accept, wait awhile (grin).

    If at any time during the updates you are required to reboot (a very rare thing in Linux, but does sometimes happen), make certain you boot again in the Recovery mode.

    Once all updates are in, use the Software Manager in Yast to install the correct nVidia driver.

    Do Not uninstall the nouveau driver at this point. Instead, just install the nVidia driver and its dependencies. This install should automatically blacklist the nouveau driver, so you have no need to bother touching the nouveau.

    After the nVidia driver is installed, you should be able to power down and boot normally.

    Good luck, keep me posted.
    "Take a Walk on a Sunny Day, Greet everyone along the way, and Make Somebody Smile, Today"
    Gerry Jack Macks"Walk On A Sunny Day" GerryJackMacks.net

  9. #9

    Default Re: Boot to terminal in 13.1

    Thanks for the detailed post! It will be a few days before I can run through this though (working a ton).

  10. #10

    Default Re: Boot to terminal in 13.1

    OK, now how do I make it ALWAYS boot in runlevel 3? (I used to edit inittab, but that no longer seems to work.)

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