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Thread: External HD permisions

  1. #1

    Default External HD permisions

    Good Morning

    I have connected an USB external HD on my PC.
    I have made a second account in my system but i cannot give permission to enter the HD.
    I gave the command in su mode: chmod -R 777 /run/media/(user owner of the disk)/(disk) but it did not gave perimission to all.
    Where have i made the mistake?

    Thank you in advance!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
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    Netherlands
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    Default Re: External HD permisions

    Most probably the file systems on those mass storage devices are not native Linux. They are probably something Wiindows like NTFS or FAT..

    And as Those file system do not know anything about ownership and permissions, they are faked on your Linux system. And when they are mounted "automaticaly" using the desktop for user A, the faking is that they are owned by user A and given faked permissions that protect them by being used by other users (not illogical). When user A unmounts/removes (save removal) the device and it is then used by user B, you will see that user B is now the (faked) owner.

    You can of course not change the owner/permissions on the device (chown/chmod) because there aren't any on the file system.

    You can however mount such a file system in such a way that all users can do things with it using a mount statement (very handy to use an fstab entry for that to configure the wanted mountpoint and options) yourself instead of using the "automatic" mount by the desktop.
    Henk van Velden

  3. #3

    Default Re: External HD permisions

    Quote Originally Posted by hcvv View Post
    Most probably the file systems on those mass storage devices are not native Linux. They are probably something Wiindows like NTFS or FAT..

    And as Those file system do not know anything about ownership and permissions, they are faked on your Linux system. And when they are mounted "automaticaly" using the desktop for user A, the faking is that they are owned by user A and given faked permissions that protect them by being used by other users (not illogical). When user A unmounts/removes (save removal) the device and it is then used by user B, you will see that user B is now the (faked) owner.

    You can of course not change the owner/permissions on the device (chown/chmod) because there aren't any on the file system.

    You can however mount such a file system in such a way that all users can do things with it using a mount statement (very handy to use an fstab entry for that to configure the wanted mountpoint and options) yourself instead of using the "automatic" mount by the desktop.
    What changes should i do in fstab?

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