Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 11

Thread: multiple kernels

  1. #1

    Default multiple kernels

    Hello.

    After upgrading to opensuse 13.1 I have found that I have enabled the option in / etc / zypp / zypp.conf to have multiple kernels installed.

    I do not remember this option manually activated, is automatically activated after upgrading?

    Thank you.

  2. #2

    Default AW: multiple kernels

    Quote Originally Posted by jony127 View Post
    After upgrading to opensuse 13.1 I have found that I have enabled the option in / etc / zypp / zypp.conf to have multiple kernels installed.

    I do not remember this option manually activated, is automatically activated after upgrading?
    This is enabled by default since 12.3.
    If you haven't changed the config file manually rpm will replace it with the new version. If you did edit it, it should not get replaced though, zypp.conf.rpmnew will be created instead with the new defaults. It would be your own job to merge that with the existing /etc/zypp.conf if necessary.
    There's also the command "rcrpmconfigcheck" to find/list those *.rpmnew and *.rpmsave files on your system.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Spain
    Posts
    25,547

    Default Re: multiple kernels

    On 2014-02-10 14:36, jony127 wrote:
    > I do not remember this option manually activated, is automatically
    > activated after upgrading?


    Should be. it can save your life :-)

    --
    Cheers / Saludos,

    Carlos E. R.

    (from 13.1 x86_64 "Bottle" (Minas Tirith))

  4. #4

    Default Re: multiple kernels

    Why the multikernel is now enabled by default? Is it really necessary?

    It is assumed that minor kernel updates and are tested.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    5,500

    Default Re: multiple kernels

    Quote Originally Posted by jony127 View Post
    Why the multikernel is now enabled by default? Is it really necessary?

    It is assumed that minor kernel updates and are tested.
    Testing does not guarantee perfection. Why? Kernel updates contain fixes which may result in adverse side effects not found during testing. Also, human beings sometimes make mistakes. Without a system backup, a re-install might be the only recovery in some situations.

    If a problem results, multiple kernels give the user a simple way back to reboot the previous kernel. I don't recall anyone complaining before.
    Leap 42.3 (ext4, KDE Plasma 5.8.7) ~ stable
    Manjaro (ext4, Xfce) ~ rolling updates
    Tumbleweed (ext4, KDE Plasma5) ~ managed updates via "Tumbleweed Snapshots" service.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Spain
    Posts
    25,547

    Default Re: multiple kernels

    On 2014-02-11 15:16, jony127 wrote:
    >
    > Why the multikernel is now enabled by default?


    Because it is good. Many people requested it.

    > Is it really necessary?


    Yes.

    > It is assumed that minor kernel updates and are tested.


    Many people got their machines un-bootable after one of those "minor"
    kernel updates.

    If you are sure that you are safe, just disable the feature. But then do
    not complain if your machine does not boot after a kernel update one day...

    --
    Cheers / Saludos,

    Carlos E. R.

    (from 13.1 x86_64 "Bottle" (Minas Tirith))

  7. #7

    Default Re: multiple kernels

    Quote Originally Posted by consused View Post
    Testing does not guarantee perfection. Why? Kernel updates contain fixes which may result in adverse side effects not found during testing. Also, human beings sometimes make mistakes. Without a system backup, a re-install might be the only recovery in some situations.

    If a problem results, multiple kernels give the user a simple way back to reboot the previous kernel. I don't recall anyone complaining before.
    I guess another advantage of multiple kernels is that the running kernel's modules stay on the hard disk.

    In earlier versions (12.2 and before) you (mostly) had to reboot immediately after installing a kernel update, because installing the update removed the currently running kernel's modules. So without rebooting, the kernel couldn't load any modules from the hard disk anymore.
    The effect of this was, that you suddenly could not access any USB sticks/external hard disks you connected f.e.

    With multiple kernels this problem doesn't exist because the current kernel modules don't get deleted anymore.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Moses Lake, WA. USA
    Posts
    474

    Default Re: multiple kernels

    jony127 wrote:

    >
    > Why the multikernel is now enabled by default? Is it really necessary?
    >
    > It is assumed that minor kernel updates and are tested.
    >

    Also it is impossible to test all variations of hardware and software
    that are out there.
    --
    openSUSE 13.1(Linux 3.11.6-4-desktop x86_64|
    Intel(R) Quad Core(TM) i5-4440 CPU @ 3.10GHz|8GB DDR3|
    GeForce 8400GS (NVIDIA-Linux-x86_64-331.38)|KDE 4.12.2


  9. #9

    Default Re: multiple kernels

    ok I understand the advantage but a problem, when the kernel is updated the previous entries did not appear in the grub, only the new update. So I can not boot previous kernel versions.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    West Virginia Sector 13
    Posts
    15,797

    Default Re: multiple kernels

    Look in advanced in the boot screen

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •