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Thread: /var/tmp file FULL

  1. #1

    Default /var/tmp file FULL

    This is about Machine # 1. [see below]

    It has a 120 GB SSD for my root partition, where all the / <files> exist, except /tmp and /var/tmp and /var/log which reside on another HDD and are 8, 4 and 4 GB respectively.

    Question1: When I right click on /var and click on properties, it shows that the location is / and the size is 128.0 TiB with 48,769 files and 5,420 subfolders. Why would it report it as thus, when it is only a portion of / on a 120 GB SSD?

    Question 2: I am reading up on the deletion of files in /tmp, /var/tmp and /var/log, because I just recently ran out of room in /var/tmp [4 GB]. I think I should increase my /var/tmp folder size to 6 or 8 GB. I assume that it is possible to do a partition resize?
    The HDD is 232.88 GB and is divided into:
    /home [50.05 GB],
    /tmp[8.01GB],
    /var/tmp [4.0GB],
    /var/log [4.0GB],
    swap [1.07GB] and
    Storage [165.75GB].
    Split this way in accordance to directions rec'd [from this site] when I first started using an SSD for my main drive.
    The storage area is 15.6GB full, so that is where I would take the extra room from for /var/tmp [another 4.0GB]. However, how do I know what is being reported as used up size is correct, in view of Question 1?
    Or
    Should I forget doing a resize and simply setup a clean up in Cron [Sysconfig Editor] thru Yast? I only reboot that machine about once a month.

    Thanks
    Machine # 1 - Asus Prime Z390A, i7-9700k 3.6GHz, 32.0 GB ram, openSUSE Leap 15.0 64-bit, KDE Plasma 5.12.8
    Machine # 2 - Asus P8Z77-V Deluxe, i7-3770k 3.5GHz, 16.0 GB ram, opensuse Tumbleweed KDE Plasma 5.17.0

  2. #2
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    Default Re: /var/tmp file FULL

    On 2014-01-16 01:06, LaQuirrELL wrote:
    >
    > This is about _*Machine_#_1*_. [see below]
    >
    > It has a 120 GB SSD for my root partition, where all the / <files>
    > exist, except /tmp and /var/tmp and /var/log which reside on another HDD
    > and are 8, 4 and 4 GB respectively.
    >
    > Question1: When I right click on /var and click on properties, it shows
    > that the location is / and the size is 128.0 *TiB* with 48,769 files and
    > 5,420 subfolders. Why would it report it as thus, when it is *-only a
    > portion-* of / on a 120 GB SSD?


    Please clarify how you obtain that data. Some CLI commands with the
    output posted here would do nicely :-)

    And do so inside code tags (the '#' button in the forum editor).

    View this post and the next



    > Should I forget doing a resize and simply setup a clean up in Cron
    > [Sysconfig Editor] thru Yast? I only reboot that machine about once a
    > month.


    That's a feature that no longer works.

    --
    Cheers / Saludos,

    Carlos E. R.
    (from 12.3 x86_64 "Dartmouth" at Telcontar)

  3. #3
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    Default Re: /var/tmp file FULL

    128TiB indicates a mapping into the kernel address space It s of course not real memory or disk space just what the kernel can address you also see that on /proc and /dev

    You see it looking at properties in a browser.

  4. #4
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    Default Re: /var/tmp file FULL

    Please, when you want to show us your partitions do so with
    Code:
    su -c '/usr/sbin/fdisk -l'
    and when you want to show where the file systems on those partitions are mounted, do so with
    Code:
    mount
    and when you want to show how full thes file systems are, do so with
    Code:
    df -h
    Copy past that from your terminal window, the prompty, the command, the output and the next prompt all in one sweep, between CODE tags in your post. You get the CODE tags by clicking on the # button in the toool bar of the post editor.
    Henk van Velden

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  6. #6
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    Default Re: /var/tmp file FULL

    On 2014-01-16 23:26, john hudson wrote:
    >
    > See http://tinyurl.com/knc28sf
    >


    Again, that method is obsolete and does not work any longer.

    --
    Cheers / Saludos,

    Carlos E. R.
    (from 12.3 x86_64 "Dartmouth" at Telcontar)

  7. #7

    Default Re: /var/tmp file FULL

    @robin_listas
    This is where/how I obtained file size info mentioned in 1st question. Obviously, this is not beleivable, but why would it report it as thus?

    Question1:
    In Dolphin file manager, when I right click on /var and click on properties
    , it shows that the location is / and the size is 128.0 TiB with 48,769 files and 5,420 subfolders. Why would it report it as thus, when it is only a portion of / on a 120 GB SSD?
    Here is the info from commands, shown as suggested by hcvv .
    Code:
    dabud@linux-8ddc:~> su -c '/usr/sbin/fdisk -l'
    Password: 
    
    WARNING: GPT (GUID Partition Table) detected on '/dev/sda'! The util fdisk doesn't support GPT. Use GNU Parted.
    
    
    Disk /dev/sda: 128.0 GB, 128035676160 bytes
    255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 15566 cylinders, total 250069680 sectors
    Units = sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
    Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
    I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
    Disk identifier: 0x00000000
    
       Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System
    /dev/sda1               1   250069679   125034839+  ee  GPT
    
    WARNING: GPT (GUID Partition Table) detected on '/dev/sdb'! The util fdisk doesn't support GPT. Use GNU Parted.
    
    
    Disk /dev/sdb: 250.1 GB, 250059350016 bytes
    255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 30401 cylinders, total 488397168 sectors
    Units = sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
    Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 4096 bytes
    I/O size (minimum/optimal): 4096 bytes / 4096 bytes
    Disk identifier: 0x00000000
    
       Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System
    /dev/sdb1               1   488397167   244198583+  ee  GPT
    Partition 1 does not start on physical sector boundary.
    
    Disk /dev/sdc: 500.1 GB, 500107862016 bytes
    255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 60801 cylinders, total 976773168 sectors
    Units = sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
    Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 4096 bytes
    I/O size (minimum/optimal): 4096 bytes / 4096 bytes
    Disk identifier: 0x000568cb
    
       Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System
    /dev/sdc1            2048   976773119   488385536   83  Linux
    
    Disk /dev/sdd: 250.1 GB, 250059350016 bytes
    255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 30401 cylinders, total 488397168 sectors
    Units = sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
    Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 4096 bytes
    I/O size (minimum/optimal): 4096 bytes / 4096 bytes
    Disk identifier: 0x0006384f
    
       Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System
    /dev/sdd1            2048   488396799   244197376   83  Linux
    dabud@linux-8ddc:~>
    Code:
    dabud@linux-8ddc:~> mount
    devtmpfs on /dev type devtmpfs (rw,relatime,size=8054736k,nr_inodes=2013684,mode=755)
    tmpfs on /dev/shm type tmpfs (rw,relatime)
    tmpfs on /run type tmpfs (rw,nosuid,nodev,relatime,mode=755)
    devpts on /dev/pts type devpts (rw,relatime,gid=5,mode=620,ptmxmode=000)
    /dev/sda2 on / type ext4 (rw,noatime,discard,data=ordered)
    proc on /proc type proc (rw,relatime)
    sysfs on /sys type sysfs (rw,relatime)
    securityfs on /sys/kernel/security type securityfs (rw,nosuid,nodev,noexec,relatime)
    tmpfs on /sys/fs/cgroup type tmpfs (rw,nosuid,nodev,noexec,mode=755)
    cgroup on /sys/fs/cgroup/systemd type cgroup (rw,nosuid,nodev,noexec,relatime,release_agent=/usr/lib/systemd/systemd-cgroups-agent,name=systemd)
    cgroup on /sys/fs/cgroup/cpuset type cgroup (rw,nosuid,nodev,noexec,relatime,cpuset)
    cgroup on /sys/fs/cgroup/cpu,cpuacct type cgroup (rw,nosuid,nodev,noexec,relatime,cpuacct,cpu)
    cgroup on /sys/fs/cgroup/memory type cgroup (rw,nosuid,nodev,noexec,relatime,memory)
    cgroup on /sys/fs/cgroup/devices type cgroup (rw,nosuid,nodev,noexec,relatime,devices)
    cgroup on /sys/fs/cgroup/freezer type cgroup (rw,nosuid,nodev,noexec,relatime,freezer)
    cgroup on /sys/fs/cgroup/net_cls type cgroup (rw,nosuid,nodev,noexec,relatime,net_cls)
    cgroup on /sys/fs/cgroup/blkio type cgroup (rw,nosuid,nodev,noexec,relatime,blkio)
    cgroup on /sys/fs/cgroup/perf_event type cgroup (rw,nosuid,nodev,noexec,relatime,perf_event)
    cgroup on /sys/fs/cgroup/hugetlb type cgroup (rw,nosuid,nodev,noexec,relatime,hugetlb)
    systemd-1 on /proc/sys/fs/binfmt_misc type autofs (rw,relatime,fd=33,pgrp=1,timeout=300,minproto=5,maxproto=5,direct)
    mqueue on /dev/mqueue type mqueue (rw,relatime)
    hugetlbfs on /dev/hugepages type hugetlbfs (rw,relatime)
    tmpfs on /var/lock type tmpfs (rw,nosuid,nodev,relatime,mode=755)
    debugfs on /sys/kernel/debug type debugfs (rw,relatime)
    tmpfs on /var/run type tmpfs (rw,nosuid,nodev,relatime,mode=755)
    /dev/sda1 on /boot/efi type vfat (rw,relatime,fmask=0002,dmask=0002,allow_utime=0020,codepage=cp437,iocharset=iso8859-1,shortname=mixed,utf8,errors=remount-ro)
    /dev/sdb4 on /var/log type ext4 (rw,relatime,data=ordered)
    /dev/sdb3 on /var/tmp type ext4 (rw,relatime,data=ordered)
    /dev/sdb2 on /tmp type ext4 (rw,relatime,data=ordered)
    /dev/sdb1 on /home type ext4 (rw,relatime,data=ordered)
    /dev/sdc1 on /home/FileShare type ext4 (rw,relatime,data=ordered)
    /dev/sdd1 on /home/FileEdit type ext4 (rw,relatime,data=ordered)
    /dev/sdb6 on /home/Library type ext4 (rw,relatime,data=ordered)
    none on /var/lib/ntp/proc type proc (ro,nosuid,nodev,relatime)
    gvfsd-fuse on /run/user/1000/gvfs type fuse.gvfsd-fuse (rw,nosuid,nodev,relatime,user_id=1000,group_id=100)
    gvfsd-fuse on /var/run/user/1000/gvfs type fuse.gvfsd-fuse (rw,nosuid,nodev,relatime,user_id=1000,group_id=100)
    fusectl on /sys/fs/fuse/connections type fusectl (rw,relatime)
    dabud@linux-8ddc:~>

    Code:
    dabud@linux-8ddc:~> df -h
    Filesystem      Size  Used Avail Use% Mounted on
    devtmpfs        7.7G   52K  7.7G   1% /dev
    tmpfs           7.7G     0  7.7G   0% /dev/shm
    tmpfs           7.7G  5.7M  7.7G   1% /run
    /dev/sda2       118G  5.9G  106G   6% /
    tmpfs           7.7G     0  7.7G   0% /sys/fs/cgroup
    tmpfs           7.7G  5.7M  7.7G   1% /var/lock
    tmpfs           7.7G  5.7M  7.7G   1% /var/run
    /dev/sda1       156M  128K  156M   1% /boot/efi
    /dev/sdb4       4.0G  169M  3.6G   5% /var/log
    /dev/sdb3       4.0G  527M  3.3G  14% /var/tmp
    /dev/sdb2       7.9G  147M  7.4G   2% /tmp
    /dev/sdb1        50G  6.5G   41G  14% /home
    /dev/sdc1       459G  200G  236G  46% /home/FileShare
    /dev/sdd1       230G   72G  147G  33% /home/FileEdit
    /dev/sdb6       164G   16G  140G  11% /home/Library
    dabud@linux-8ddc:~>
    @robin_listas
    That's a feature that no longer works.
    setup a clean up in Cron [Sysconfig Editor] thru Yast
    Re: Question #2:Resize partition or scheduled cleanup. Is it no longer possible to schedule a "Cron" cleanup or no longer possible to schedule a cleanup? If neither is possible, are my only other options to resize /var/tmp or manually delete files from /var/tmp and /var/log?
    Machine # 1 - Asus Prime Z390A, i7-9700k 3.6GHz, 32.0 GB ram, openSUSE Leap 15.0 64-bit, KDE Plasma 5.12.8
    Machine # 2 - Asus P8Z77-V Deluxe, i7-3770k 3.5GHz, 16.0 GB ram, opensuse Tumbleweed KDE Plasma 5.17.0

  8. #8
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    Default Re: /var/tmp file FULL

    Hi
    Just a sidenote, since a lot of users may have gpt devices, using lsblk or gdisk -l /dev/sdN when N is a b c etc.

    For example;
    Code:
    gdisk -l /dev/sd[a..c]
    
    GPT fdisk (gdisk) version 0.8.7
    
    Partition table scan:
      MBR: protective
      BSD: not present
      APM: not present
      GPT: present
    
    Found valid GPT with protective MBR; using GPT.
    Disk /dev/sda: 250069680 sectors, 119.2 GiB
    Logical sector size: 512 bytes
    Disk identifier (GUID): 21CD0BBF-5734-41D9-9F36-BC48DE2A0A86
    Partition table holds up to 128 entries
    First usable sector is 34, last usable sector is 250069646
    Partitions will be aligned on 2048-sector boundaries
    Total free space is 2669 sectors (1.3 MiB)
    
    Number  Start (sector)    End (sector)  Size       Code  Name
       1            2048          530431   258.0 MiB   EF00  primary
       2          530432        84420607   40.0 GiB    0700  primary
       3        84420608       231223295   70.0 GiB    0700  primary
       4       231223296       250068991   9.0 GiB     0700  primary
    
    lsblk
    
    NAME   MAJ:MIN RM   SIZE RO TYPE MOUNTPOINT
    sda      8:0    0 119.2G  0 disk 
    ├─sda1   8:1    0   258M  0 part /boot/efi
    ├─sda2   8:2    0    40G  0 part /
    ├─sda3   8:3    0    70G  0 part /data
    └─sda4   8:4    0     9G  0 part [SWAP]
    sr0     11:0    1  1024M  0 rom
    Cheers Malcolm °¿° SUSE Knowledge Partner (Linux Counter #276890)
    SUSE SLE, openSUSE Leap/Tumbleweed (x86_64) | GNOME DE
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    please show your appreciation and click on the star below... Thanks!

  9. #9
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    Default Re: /var/tmp file FULL

    On 2014-01-21 16:26, LaQuirrELL wrote:
    >
    > *@robin_listas*
    > This is where/how I obtained file size info mentioned in 1st question.
    > Obviously, this is not beleivable, but why would it report it as thus?


    Because it is thus!


    >> Question1:> > > *_In_Dolphin_file_manager_, when I right click on /var and click on
    >>> properties*> > , it shows that the location is / and the size is 128.0 *TiB* with

    >> 48,769 files and 5,420 subfolders. Why would it report it as thus,
    >> when it is *-only a portion-* of / on a 120 GB SSD?


    Because it contains a virtual file, kcore, which has a size of 128 TB.
    Notice the word "virtual". It does not resides on the disk, but there is
    an entry for it. So disk tools will see that entry and add it.

    You have to use a different tool that allows telling it not to count
    virtual files or different fielsystems.
    > --------------------
    >
    >
    > @ROBIN_LISTAS> That's a feature that no longer works.
    >> setup a clean up in Cron [Sysconfig Editor] thru Yast

    > Re: Question #2:Resize partition or scheduled cleanup. Is it no longer
    > possible to schedule a *"Cron" cleanup* or no longer possible to
    > schedule a cleanup? If neither is possible, are my only other options
    > to resize /var/tmp or manually delete files from /var/tmp and /var/log?


    You can certainly create your own cron jobs to do that. But the system
    cron job referred in that article does no longer exist. Purportedly
    systemd takes care of that. If it doesn't, bad luck.

    --
    Cheers / Saludos,

    Carlos E. R.
    (from 12.3 x86_64 "Dartmouth" at Telcontar)

  10. #10
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    Default Re: /var/tmp file FULL

    Note that in Linux and Unix all things are seen as files. So the virtual files you see are actually part of the kernel space which is 128 TiB

    There are many things that show up in the file system that are not files in the sense that they live on the disk.

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