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Thread: Update the system Python!

  1. #1

    Exclamation Update the system Python!

    Hi
    just tried to update my python installation, if i compile it with hand, it will not update the old one (/usr/bin) and the ystem python is in /bin , because python is now in the version 2.7.6 and it has fixed some bugs (opensuse 13.1 comes with 2.7.5), so how to make it on opensuse? (maybe the hack of replacing the system python with the compiled one...)

  2. #2

    Default Re: Update the system Python!

    Quote Originally Posted by abdelouahab View Post
    Hi
    just tried to update my python installation, if i compile it with hand, it will not update the old one (/usr/bin) and the ystem python is in /bin , because python is now in the version 2.7.6 and it has fixed some bugs (opensuse 13.1 comes with 2.7.5), so how to make it on opensuse? (maybe the hack of replacing the system python with the compiled one...)
    I would say, just install python from the devel:languages:python repo, see here: (click on "Show other versions" and "Show unstable packages")
    software.opensuse.org:

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Update the system Python!

    Quote Originally Posted by abdelouahab View Post
    python is now in the version 2.7.6 and it has fixed some bugs (opensuse 13.1 comes with 2.7.5), so how to make it on opensuse?
    Open bug report on Novell bugzilla, describe bugs and point to upstream fixes. Then Python maintainer may decide to issue update. If you also build RPM that contains fixes and submit maintenance request it will increases chances of it See openSUSE:Fixing bugs - openSUSE

  4. #4

    Default Re: Update the system Python!

    thank you
    Quote Originally Posted by wolfi323 View Post
    I would say, just install python from the devel:languagesython repo, see here: (click on "Show other versions" and "Show unstable packages")
    software.opensuse.org:
    but why it is considered unstable, the only stable version is 2.7.5

    Quote Originally Posted by arvidjaar View Post
    Open bug report on Novell bugzilla, describe bugs and point to upstream fixes. Then Python maintainer may decide to issue update. If you also build RPM that contains fixes and submit maintenance request it will increases chances of it See openSUSE:Fixing bugs - openSUSE
    yes, i will try to do it, so opensuse will get sync with the latest python/

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Update the system Python!

    I am sure someone better versed in the terminology will point you at a more precise answer, but for now here is my
    "working" impression on what is stable, etc.

    If a version of xyz, eg, python, is in the release of an openSUSE version, say 13.1, then that version is "stable" for 13.1.
    So, for example, python 2.7.5 is "stable" for 13.1.
    If it needs to be fixed, for security or 'broken' issues, it will be updated in OSS-update repo to 2.7.5-xx (dash release).

    As packages evolve with new or significantly modified functionality, they get dot releases, e.g. python 2.7.6.
    These "upstream" packages are available in numerous repositories, I always look first with PackageSearch.
    Frequently, upstream packages may be dependent on other dot releases and those updates will be included as well by YAST or zypper.
    But, for release 13.1, they are considered "unstable".

    The decision to include dot releases as stable releases, e.g. the frequent (too frequent?) updates to Firefox, are made by the package maintainers, I believe.
    The package maintainers may also create dash releases of stable packages with specifc bug fixes that in their opinion are critical to the on-going viability of the "stable" release.

    In my experience, upstream "unstable" newer dot releases you find in official repos are safe, give or take a new bug or two.
    They often bring in new functionality you might want.

    Just beware of any updates in "Factory" repos, that is where bleeding edge work is going on; loading packages from Factory repos may drag in numerous other Factory libs and compromise your system.

    If you prefer life closer to the bleeding edge, investigate the Tumbleweed release. It is well documented.
    Desk: i7-4790K Leap 15.1(x86_64)4.12.14-lp151.28.7-default KF5 59.0 Plasma 5.14.4 Qt 5.13.0
    Lap: HPDV7T i7 Leap 15.0(x86_64)4.12.14-lp151.28.7-default KF5 59.0 Plasma 5.14.4 Qt 5.13.0

  6. #6

    Default Re: Update the system Python!

    Quote Originally Posted by cmcgrath5035 View Post
    I am sure someone better versed in the terminology will point you at a more precise answer, but for now here is my
    "working" impression on what is stable, etc.

    If a version of xyz, eg, python, is in the release of an openSUSE version, say 13.1, then that version is "stable" for 13.1.
    So, for example, python 2.7.5 is "stable" for 13.1.
    If it needs to be fixed, for security or 'broken' issues, it will be updated in OSS-update repo to 2.7.5-xx (dash release).

    As packages evolve with new or significantly modified functionality, they get dot releases, e.g. python 2.7.6.
    These "upstream" packages are available in numerous repositories, I always look first with PackageSearch.
    Frequently, upstream packages may be dependent on other dot releases and those updates will be included as well by YAST or zypper.
    But, for release 13.1, they are considered "unstable".

    The decision to include dot releases as stable releases, e.g. the frequent (too frequent?) updates to Firefox, are made by the package maintainers, I believe.
    The package maintainers may also create dash releases of stable packages with specifc bug fixes that in their opinion are critical to the on-going viability of the "stable" release.

    In my experience, upstream "unstable" newer dot releases you find in official repos are safe, give or take a new bug or two.
    They often bring in new functionality you might want.

    Just beware of any updates in "Factory" repos, that is where bleeding edge work is going on; loading packages from Factory repos may drag in numerous other Factory libs and compromise your system.

    If you prefer life closer to the bleeding edge, investigate the Tumbleweed release. It is well documented.
    ah! thank you for the clear explication, i tried to update it, but it seems that many packages have dependecies in the 2.7.5, so i think i'll wait untill opensuse sees that it is time to move to 2.7.6
    thank you again|

  7. #7

    Default Re: Update the system Python!

    Quote Originally Posted by abdelouahab View Post
    ah! thank you for the clear explication, i tried to update it, but it seems that many packages have dependecies in the 2.7.5, so i think i'll wait untill opensuse sees that it is time to move to 2.7.6
    thank you again|
    You should update all packages to the version in that repo. Then those packages that have a strict dependency to 2.7.5 should get updated as well.
    See here: SDB:Vendor change update - openSUSE

    Or just tell YaST/zypper to switch each package to the version from that repo (with vendor change) in the dependency resolution dialog.

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Update the system Python!

    On 2013-12-30 00:06, abdelouahab wrote:
    > ah! thank you for the clear explication, i tried to update it, but it
    > seems that many packages have dependecies in the 2.7.5, so i think i'll
    > wait untill opensuse sees that it is time to move to 2.7.6


    Then you have to wait for 13.2.

    --
    Cheers / Saludos,

    Carlos E. R.
    (from 13.1 x86_64 "Bottle" (Elessar))

  9. #9

    Default Re: Update the system Python!

    Quote Originally Posted by wolfi323 View Post
    You should update all packages to the version in that repo. Then those packages that have a strict dependency to 2.7.5 should get updated as well.
    See here: SDB:Vendor change update - openSUSE

    Or just tell YaST/zypper to switch each package to the version from that repo (with vendor change) in the dependency resolution dialog.
    Yes, but it gave me 'dont install -some dependecy for python 2.7.5-' so ifeared to break the system

    Quote Originally Posted by robin_listas View Post
    On 2013-12-30 00:06, abdelouahab wrote:
    > ah! thank you for the clear explication, i tried to update it, but it
    > seems that many packages have dependecies in the 2.7.5, so i think i'll
    > wait untill opensuse sees that it is time to move to 2.7.6


    Then you have to wait for 13.2.

    --
    Cheers / Saludos,

    Carlos E. R.
    (from 13.1 x86_64 "Bottle" (Elessar))
    So even the minor update for the programming language must stick with an actual OS verion untill it will be upgraded?

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Update the system Python!

    Quote Originally Posted by abdelouahab View Post
    So even the minor update for the programming language must stick with an actual OS verion untill it will be upgraded?
    It really depends on maintainer(s) of respective packages. In general, it is preferred to only add patches that fix specific bugs to avoid regressions. OTOH firefox and KDE are obvious exceptions. That is why why I told you to name specific problems in your bug report. Opening bug report to just request update to 2.7.6 because it is newer than 2.7.5 is probably pointless.

    If you have real problem with version 2.7.5 that is fixed in 2.7.6 then tell so in bug report. Be as specific as possible. If update with fix for this problem is released, does it really matter whether update will be called 2.7.6 or 2.7.5-23?

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