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Thread: Hardware motherboard experience for new PC ?

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    Default Hardware motherboard experience for new PC ?

    I am considering purchasing a new PC from a site where I can configure the PC myself, and I am not compelled to purchase MS-Windows for the PC : klatt.de - Intel-2011 motherboards where I would likely chose a Core i7-4820K, 4x 3.70GHz CPU.

    Their selection is limited to the following:
    • ASRock X79 Extreme4-M, X79
    • ASUS P9X79, X79
    • MSI X79A-GD65 (8D), X79
    • ASUS Rampage IV Gene, X79
    • ASUS Sabertooth X79


    Cost is not a big issue for me wrt which of the above 5 to select. But it need be one of these 5 (unless I go to a an Intel-1150 compatible from same supplier or go to a different supplier for a motherboard where again I want to ideally purchase a PC without Windows). I have surfed a fair amount on each motherboard (for GNU/Linux compatibility) and I have read of both major frustrations and semi-success stories for all of the above motherboards. Because these all support UEFI and that is fairly new, it is not surprising to read of lots of frustrations with these motherboards and GNU/Linux.

    The other possibility is an Intel-1150 compatible motherboard from same source : klatt-it.de for Intel-1150 where I would likely chose an Core i7-4770, 4x 3.40GHz CPU.
    • ASRock H81M-DGS
    • ASUS B85M-E
    • Gigabyte GA-H87M-D3H
    • ASUS H87-Pro
    • MSI Z87M-G43
    • Gigabyte GA-Z87X-UD3H

    but I have not yet researched the above for GNU/Linux compatibility (I am still in the process of doing the same).

    I was curious if any openSUSE forum members have any experience with any of these motherboards ?
    Last edited by oldcpu; 20-Dec-2013 at 08:17.

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    Default Re: Hardware motherboard experience for new PC ?

    Lee, I've never had trouble with ASUS, they even helped out when I couldn't get a special keyboard to work, through a chat session. What impressed me was that the person I spoke to was linux knowledgable. A customer is a dedicated Gigabyte fan, they have 12.3 and 13.1 on approx 2 year old machines, no issues.
    MSI has brought me weird trouble, but it can be the motherboard wasn't 100% OK from the start. It ended up sending 12V to all USB equipment (at least that's what I was told. Wireless mouse and keyboard, webcam, all dead).

    These days I would also have a good look at the GPU details. Some i5 and i7's have a GPU integrated, some don't. My son recently found out his i7's integrated Intel is doing much better than the NVIDA 8400 GS. Or are you planning to buy a grapics card to match the i7?
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    Default Re: Hardware motherboard experience for new PC ?

    Quote Originally Posted by Knurpht View Post
    Lee, I've never had trouble with ASUS, they even helped out when I couldn't get a special keyboard to work, through a chat session. What impressed me was that the person I spoke to was linux knowledgable. A customer is a dedicated Gigabyte fan, they have 12.3 and 13.1 on approx 2 year old machines, no issues. MSI has brought me weird trouble, but it can be the motherboard wasn't 100% OK from the start. It ended up sending 12V to all USB equipment (at least that's what I was told. Wireless mouse and keyboard, webcam, all dead).
    I have both Asus and MSI motherboards at home. I have no complaints with either. But what I am hoping to do is find out specific information (hopefully positive) on some of the motherboards I mentioned to support a decision for purchase. I did find information with GNU/Linux use on each of the first five Intel-2011 motherboards I mentioned (albeit in most cases it was from users complaining about some aspect they could not get working).

    For the second group of Intel-1150 compatible, I could find no GNU/Linux use information (yet) on the ASRock H81M-DGS, the ASUS B85M-E, nor theGigabyte GA-H87M-D3H. I did find some information on GNU/Linux use with the ASUS H87-Pro, the MSI Z87M-G43, and the Gigabyte GA-Z87X-UD3H, although once again, it was mostly posts by users complaining they could not configure some aspects. Again UEFI almost always was causing problems.

    Quote Originally Posted by Knurpht View Post
    These days I would also have a good look at the GPU details. Some i5 and i7's have a GPU integrated, some don't. My son recently found out his i7's integrated Intel is doing much better than the NVIDA 8400 GS. Or are you planning to buy a grapics card to match the i7?
    I had been thinking of purchasing a relatively moderate/average performance graphics card (probably the GeForce GTX 650, 1024MB) to go with the motherboards. Having typed that, I still have not researched GNU/Linux compatibility with that graphic card, and I need to do so.
    Last edited by oldcpu; 20-Dec-2013 at 14:39.

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    Default Re: Hardware motherboard experience for new PC ?

    Quote Originally Posted by oldcpu View Post
    I had been thinking of purchasing a relatively moderate/average performance graphics card (probably the GeForce GTX 650, 1024MB) to go with the motherboards. Having typed that, I still have not researched GNU/Linux compatibility with that graphic card, and I need to do so.
    Having typed the above on the GeForce GTX 650 I note this Phoronix review: [Phoronix] NVIDIA GeForce GTX 650 On Linux Review where they state:

    Quote Originally Posted by phoronix
    The only real disappointments out of the GeForce GTX 650 with the official NVIDIA Linux driver was the poor performance in GpuTest and LuxMark relative to the other tested AMD/NVIDIA graphics hardware. The NVIDIA Linux driver also has the sad limitation of not supporting overclocking with the Fermi and Kepler GPUs, which limits potential out of the very latest hardware.

    If you have a $100 USD limit for a new graphics card, and are fond of using NVIDIA's first rate binary Linux driver, the GeForce GTX 650 seems like a contender worth considering. The open-source support is okay with Nouveau but is severely limited right now over the lack of re-clocking support, but it will be resolved in the future and is good enough right now for desktop purposes.

    On the other hand, if you exclusively want to use an open-source Linux driver for your next graphics card purchase and be free of binary blobs, the Radeon HD 6770 or other similar AMD HD 5000/6000 series graphics cards (that are still on the R600 Galium3D driver rather than the HD 7000 series and new dependant upon the less complete and slower "RadeonSI" driver) would be your better choice
    I have not looked at the Radeon HD 6770 either, but I confess to being a user who does lean toward nvidia over radeon as a general approach. Thus far I have been more happy with nVidia support for graphics cards with Linux, than with AMDs support, and hence I prefer to send my money toward nVidia. But I concede others may have different experience than I on this important subject.

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    Default Re: Hardware motherboard experience for new PC ?

    Quote Originally Posted by oldcpu View Post
    Having typed the above on the GeForce GTX 650 I note this Phoronix review: [Phoronix] NVIDIA GeForce GTX 650 On Linux Review where they state:

    I have not looked at the Radeon HD 6770 either, but I confess to being a user who does lean toward nvidia over radeon as a general approach. Thus far I have been more happy with nVidia support for graphics cards with Linux, than with AMDs support, and hence I prefer to send my money toward nVidia. But I concede others may have different experience than I on this important subject.
    wrt graphic cards, out of curiousity I also looked at the GeForce GTX 660 specifications, noting in addition to requiring much more power, and being almost twice the price of the GTX 650 ( 75-euros for GTX 650 vs 154-euros for the GTX 660) , the GTX 660 does have increased functionality (such as SLI for multiple monitors with an nvidia additional card) and has greatly superior specified performance. However I note a number of threads on our forum and on the nvidia forum expressing disatisfaction with the nividia driver and the GTX 660, indicating tearing, where many can not experience the GTX 660 performance. That puts a damper on the GTX 660, and has me looking at the slower GTX 650. ... I have not been very successful thou, in finding user reviews of the nvidia GTX 650 with GNU/Linux other than the Phoronix review - which while good, is not an average user assessment.

    wrt the Radeon HD 6770 that I mentioned in my previous post, it is not available from the supplier when I am thinking to buy my PC. My radeon options there would be (in order of increasing price):

    • Radeon R7 250, 1GB (~ 55 € )
    • Radeon R7 260X, 1GB (~ 99 € )
    • Radeon R9 270, 2GB (~ 143 € )
    • Radeon R9 270X, 2GB (~ 154 € )

    I decided to look for GNU/Linux compatibility of the Radeon R7 250, 1GB and the Radeon R9 270X, 2GB.

    I found a Phoronix review of the Radeon R9 270X, 2G here: [Phoronix] AMD Radeon R9 270X On Linux Review where they note:
    Quote Originally Posted by Phoronix
    This article serves as our first Linux review of the AMD R9 270X -- or any Rx 200 series graphics card for that matter -- in the form of the Gigabyte Radeon R9 270X 2GB ....

    While the AMD and NVIDIA graphics card comparison was limited to the cards in my possession and unfortunately no Radeon HD 7870, the (Radeon R9 270X) performance was very compelling against the Radeon HD 7850 and Radeon HD 6870/6950 graphics cards. In some of the workloads the Radeon R9 270X even beat out the Radeon HD 7950 and in other cases was just competitive. On the NVIDIA side, it obviously outperformed the GeForce GTX 460 and GTX 550 Ti while the performance obviously came up short of the GeForce GTX 680 as expected.

    When using the Catalyst 13.11 Beta driver on Linux, the support for this graphics card and features were first-rate. I haven't encountered any new issues with the R9 270X graphics card on Linux compared to other existing general Catalyst Linux driver problems.

    If open-source support is important for you, there will be proper Radeon Rx 200 series support in due time for the new GPUs. However, right now it isn't there and it will take some months until the "RadeonSI" support for the Radeon HD 7000/8000 and Rx 200 series graphics cards is comparable to the more mature R600 Gallium3D driver. If you're buying a GPU now and want to use the open-source driver over Catalyst, you are best off buying a Radeon HD 5000/6000 series graphics card for best performance and feature support on the open-source AMD Radeon Linux driver. But if the binary Catalyst Linux driver is fine by you, the Radeon R9 270X is a darn nice graphics card for the $200 segment.
    and a review of the opensource radeon driver with the R9 270X was here: AMD Radeon R9 270X On Linux - Page 2 which notes:
    Quote Originally Posted by combustor - phoronix forum
    Well for now, R9 270X performance/stability with the opensource driver is a mixed bag. With glamor enabled, 2D performance is bad, without color tiling enabled things are prone to breakage, but 3D performance is top notch. On the other hand, with EXA enabled, 2D performance is excellent, but 3D performance is ****. Even though there aren’t many commits since the last stable release of xf86-video-ati ddx driver (comparing to xf86-video-intel where Chris is spitting out code like crazy and all the work he invested in SNA acceleration development) - I'm pretty satisfied with the maturity of the ati/radeon driver, even though this is a (re)brand(ed) new card, things pretty much work OTB.
    that thread also has some interesting speculation wrt the radeon card's rebranding:
    Quote Originally Posted by lima on phoronix forum
    old name <-> new name
    8570M (Sun) <-> R7 240 (Oland DDR3)
    8670 <-> R7 250 (Oland XT GDDR5)
    7750 <-> R7 250X (Cape Verde)
    7770 <-> R7 260 (Cape Verde XT)
    7790 <-> R7 260X (Bonair)*
    7850 <-> R9 270 (Pitcrain/Curacao)
    7870 <-> R9 270X (Pitcrain/Curacao XT)
    7950 <-> R9 280 (Tahiti)
    7970 <-> R9 280X (Tahiti XT)
    new <-> R9 290 (Hawaii)*
    new <-> R9 290X (Hawaii XT)*
    Still reading the above suggests to me the R9 270X requires a beta proprietary driver and does not yet work well in all respects with the radeon opensource driver.

    I could not read any reviews of the lower priced Radeon R7 250, although I do note speculation it could be just a rebranded radeon 8670, and I have seen some obscure links to user comments.

    I also did find this AMD Catalyst™ 13.11 LINUX Beta V9.4 Driver release note which indicates support in the proprietary 13.11 Linux Beta v9.4 driver for both the R9 270X and for the cheaper/slower R7 250.

    Still, overall thou, I am tempted to go with nVidia. I have purchased radeon hardware in the past, and my experience has been they do not provide proprietary driver support for as long a time frame as nvidia (for less than cutting edge hardware) and given the radeon support for the R9 270X and R7 250 is still far short of the proprietary driver, I'm more inclined to go with a graphic card where the proprietary driver support goes for a longer time frame (which means nvidia).

    Hence at the moment, until I read more positive GNU/Linux compatibility reviews on the nVidia GTX 660, I am leaning toward the less expensive and less capable nVidia GTX 650.

    Getting back on topic, wrt motherboards I am currently leaning to purchasing the Socket-2011 MSI X79A-GD65(8D) motherboard - albeit I have not decided yet.
    Last edited by oldcpu; 21-Dec-2013 at 01:14.

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    Default Re: Hardware motherboard experience for new PC ?

    Quote Originally Posted by oldcpu View Post
    Getting back on topic, wrt motherboards I am currently leaning to purchasing the Socket-2011 MSI X79A-GD65(8D) motherboard - albeit I have not decided yet.
    The current configuration I am considering, which is not cheap, but I believe should keep me happy for another 3-years (at which time I may move to another continent, and go for a new desktop PC then) are:

    • motherboard: Socket-2011 MSI X79A-GD65(8D)
    • cpu: Core i7-4820K, 4x 3.70GHz
    • housing/case : Cooler Master HAF912 Plus
    • Power Supply: 650W Super Silent ATX 2.2 Power Supply
    • RAM : 12 GB DDR3-1600
    • graphic card: GeForce GTX 650, 1024MB (I am still very much pondering this)
    • storage-1 : 120 GB SSD
    • storage-2 : 2000 GB internal SATA hard drive
    • storage-3 : DVD reader/burner
    • storage-4 : DVD reader (I may not procure this, although its a very cheap 'backup') option
    • No pre-installed OS - The OS that I likely will install later are:
      • freedos
      • openSUSE-13.1
      • empty partition reserved possibly for Windows7
      • empty partitions for a second GNU/Linux (possibly for milestone/beta versions of openSUSE)



    I hope to decide within the next day or two, and proceed with the order.

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    Default Re: Hardware motherboard experience for new PC ?

    Lee, I have to say I ditched Phoronix as a source for information. Don't remember what the exact reason was.
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    Default Re: Hardware motherboard experience for new PC ?

    Quote Originally Posted by Knurpht View Post
    Lee, I have to say I ditched Phoronix as a source for information. Don't remember what the exact reason was.
    Where possible, I try to confirm information I obtain from any source, from a secondary source, and Phoronix is no exception. Still, between their graphic card and driver reviews, various articles, and their forum, they are a focal point for a reasonable amount of GNU/Linux information.

    Back to the 'motherboard experience' topic of this thread, and I think I need to research the Socket-2011 MSI X79A-GD65(8D) motherboard a bit more wrt any GNU/Linux user experience.

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    Default Re: Hardware motherboard experience for new PC ?

    Quote Originally Posted by oldcpu View Post
    Back to the 'motherboard experience' topic of this thread, and I think I need to research the Socket-2011 MSI X79A-GD65(8D) motherboard a bit more wrt any GNU/Linux user experience.
    I found another mail order supplier, who will custom build a PC for me, with no OS installed, and a different selection of motherboards for me to consider (listed below) so I am back into the research phase:

    Socket 2011 PCs :

    • Gigabyte U79-UD3
    • Asroc Fatal1ty X79 Professional
    • Asus X79-Deluxe


    or

    Socket 1150 PCs (listed in order of increasing price) :

    • Asus A81M-Plus
    • Asus B85M-E(C2)
    • Asrock H87-Pro4
    • Asus H87M-E(C2)
    • Gigabyte GA-H97-HD3
    • MSI Z87-G41 PC Mate
    • Asus H87 Pro (C2)
    • Gigabyte GA-Z87X-D3H
    • MSI Z87-G45 Gaming
    • Gigabyte GA-Z87X-OC


    I'm not a person who plays games (other than chess) on my PC, so likely the motherboards that specialize in supporting overclocking are not important to me. Pretty much all of the above motherboards include USB-3.0, GB LAN, and SATA-3.

    Still, thats a lengthy motherboard list for me to research for GNU/Linux compatibility ..... I can see now it may take me a while to settle on which motherboard (and graphic card) to obtain.

    This second supplier also has different graphic cards on offer, including nvidia GTX-650 (1GB), nvidia GTX-650 (2GB), and the nvidia GTX-660, and also Radeon HD7770 (1GB), and Radeon HD7950 (2GB) and Radeon R7 260X (2GB), so I have my hands full there researching GNU/Linux compatibility.

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    Default Re: Hardware motherboard experience for new PC ?

    oldcpu wrote:

    >
    > oldcpu;2610367 Wrote:
    >>
    >> Back to the 'motherboard experience' topic of this thread, and I
    >> think I
    >> need to research the Socket-2011 MSI X79A-GD65(8D) motherboard a bit
    >> more wrt any GNU/Linux user experience.
    >>

    >
    > I found another mail order supplier, who will custom build a PC for
    > me, with no OS installed, and a different selection of motherboards
    > for me to consider (listed below) so I am back into the research
    > phase:
    >
    > Socket 2011 PCs :
    >
    >
    > - Gigabyte U79-UD3
    > - Asroc Fatal1ty X79 Professional
    > - Asus X79-Deluxe
    >
    >
    > or
    >
    > Socket 1150 PCs (listed in order of increasing price) :
    >
    >
    > - Asus A81M-Plus
    > - Asus B85M-E(C2)
    > - Asrock H87-Pro4
    > - Asus H87M-E(C2)
    > - Gigabyte GA-H97-HD3
    > - MSI Z87-G41 PC Mate
    > - Asus H87 Pro (C2)
    > - Gigabyte GA-Z87X-D3H
    > - MSI Z87-G45 Gaming
    > - Gigabyte GA-Z87X-OC
    >
    >
    > I'm not a person who plays games (other than chess) on my PC, so
    > likely the motherboards that specialize in supporting overclocking are
    > not
    > important to me. Pretty much all of the above motherboards include
    > USB-3.0, GB LAN, and SATA-3.
    >
    > Still, thats a lengthy motherboard list for me to research for
    > GNU/Linux
    > compatibility ..... I can see now it may take me a while to settle
    > on which motherboard (and graphic card) to obtain.
    >
    > This second supplier also has different graphic cards on offer,
    > including nvidia GTX-650 (1GB), nvidia GTX-650 (2GB), and the nvidia
    > GTX-660, and also Radeon HD7770 (1GB), and Radeon HD7950 (2GB) and
    > Radeon R7 260X (2GB), so I have my hands full there researching
    > GNU/Linux compatibility.
    >

    I have a new Gigabyte Z87-D3HP (see Signature below) Have had no problem
    with it. have had about one month, openSUSE 12.3 and 13.1 installed on
    it. Mine is an I5 but the board does support I7 also.

    --
    openSUSE 13.1 (3.11.6-4-desktop)| GIGABYTE Z87-D3HP (Intel(R)
    Quad Core(TM) i5-4440 CPU @ 3.10GHz)|8GB DDR3|GeForce 8400GS
    (NVIDIA-Linux-x86_64-331.20)|KDE 4.11.3


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