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Thread: 13.1 Network Device Name env Vs eth

  1. #1
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    Default 13.1 Network Device Name env Vs eth

    I just did a clean install of 13.1 on one of my computers. After boot I went in to configure my network and I see that I now have enp0s10 and enp128s10 instead of eth0 and eth1. Was it changed because eth was to simple and meaningful for too many years?


    Dave W

  2. #2

    Default Re: 13.1 Network Device Name env Vs eth

    Quote Originally Posted by dwestf View Post
    I just did a clean install of 13.1 on one of my computers. After boot I went in to configure my network and I see that I now have enp0s10 and enp128s10 instead of eth0 and eth1. Was it changed because eth was to simple and meaningful for too many years?
    See here: PredictableNetworkInterfaceNames
    That page also explains how you can disable the new naming scheme.

    Plus, you can change your interface names to whatever you like (within certain limits I guess) in YaST->Network Devices->Network Settings->Overview. Just select the interface you want to rename and click on "Edit". Switch to the "Hardware" tab there and click on "Change" below "Udev rules", next to "Device Name". (this already has been possible in earlier openSUSE versions at least since 10.x)

  3. #3
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    Default Re: 13.1 Network Device Name env Vs eth

    On 2013-12-11 13:26, dwestf wrote:
    >
    > I just did a clean install of 13.1 on one of my computers. After boot I
    > went in to configure my network and I see that I now have enp0s10 and
    > enp128s10 instead of eth0 and eth1. Was it changed because eth was to
    > simple and meaningful for too many years?


    Kind of. They have to invent new things to confuse users >:-P

    No, the reason is that apparently, on machines having several
    interfaces, the name eth0, eth1, etc could change from one boot to the
    next. I mean, eth0 was not always the same plug.

    You can change the name, but I'm not sure how exactly.

    --
    Cheers / Saludos,

    Carlos E. R.
    (from 12.3 x86_64 "Dartmouth" at Telcontar)

  4. #4
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    Default Re: 13.1 Network Device Name env Vs eth

    wolfi323

    Thank you for the link. UDEV has been doing persistent naming for years (/etc/udev/rules.d/70-persistent-net.rules). You add a new network card and it gets the next number. If you image you OS to a new computer you had to edit this file to clear the entries from the old computer.

    Names incorporating physical/geographical location of the connector of the hardware (example: enp2s0)

    So where is the instructions on how to read this? How do you get physical/geographical from enp0s10 and enp128s10? How would udev get the info since it starts before the network and does not know the ip to do a geoip lookup? Why would I need geographical info on my network card, I know where I am at. If I need to connect to different computers around the world, my host naming convention would of site names in them. I would not connect to a computer to look at the network name to see where the computer was.

    Once again things were changed for the sake of changing them. What they should have come up with is a MakeModel Port number system (intel0P0).

    Dave

  5. #5

    Default AW: Re: 13.1 Network Device Name env Vs eth

    Quote Originally Posted by dwestf View Post
    Thank you for the link. UDEV has been doing persistent naming for years (/etc/udev/rules.d/70-persistent-net.rules). You add a new network card and it gets the next number. If you image you OS to a new computer you had to edit this file to clear the entries from the old computer.
    No, udev hasn't done that. But udev read that file (as any other file in /etc/udev/rules.d/) and respected it. And it still does.
    It's just the default naming that has changed.

    If you rename an interface with YaST, exactly that file (/etc/udev/rules.d/70-persistent-net.rules) is created.

    Names incorporating physical/geographical location of the connector of the hardware (example: enp2s0)

    So where is the instructions on how to read this? How do you get physical/geographical from enp0s10 and enp128s10? How would udev get the info since it starts before the network and does not know the ip to do a geoip lookup? Why would I need geographical info on my network card, I know where I am at. If I need to connect to different computers around the world, my host naming convention would of site names in them. I would not connect to a computer to look at the network name to see where the computer was.

    Once again things were changed for the sake of changing them. What they should have come up with is a MakeModel Port number system (intel0P0).
    Well, what are you complaining about here?
    Just rename your interfaces in YaST as I said, and be happy!
    Or disable the new naming scheme as explained in that article.

    And if you don't agree with the new naming scheme, complain to the systemd/udev developers...

  6. #6
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    Default Re: AW: Re: 13.1 Network Device Name env Vs eth

    Quote Originally Posted by wolfi323 View Post
    No, udev hasn't done that.
    Yes, it did. First time interface was seen udev generated rule (MAC base by default) in this file unless rule was already present.

  7. #7

    Default Re: 13.1 Network Device Name env Vs eth

    Quote Originally Posted by arvidjaar View Post
    Yes, it did. First time interface was seen udev generated rule (MAC base by default) in this file unless rule was already present.
    You refer to /lib/udev/write_net_rules I guess?

    Ok, I forgot about that.

    But the point is that you can create that file yourself or with YaST. udev still respects it and sets the interface names accordingly.
    And you can disable the new naming scheme.

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