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Thread: Upgrading from 32 bits to 64 bits

  1. #1

    Default Upgrading from 32 bits to 64 bits

    I've a 12.2 32 bits system. I'm going to upgrade hardware: mobo, memory, processor, HD.
    I'm going to copy the working system to the new one, I've done this several times and it works fine: boot with system rescue, partition new hard disk, mount new partition and old partition, copy with cp -a the entire filesystem an then install grub.
    Or even better: copy with cp -a and then upgrade to 13.1
    The question is why not upgrade to x86_64?

    I' know it's not officially supported (at least on previous versions). I've been searching reports of success doing so, but I haven't found any.
    I't may work?

    Of course other option is a fresh install 64 bits and configuring all as new (users, services, etc. ).


    regards

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Spain
    Posts
    25,547

    Default Re: Upgrading from 32 bits to 64 bits

    On 2013-12-08 23:46, fperal wrote:
    >
    > I've a 12.2 32 bits system. I'm going to upgrade hardware: mobo, memory,
    > processor, HD.
    > I'm going to copy the working system to the new one, I've done this
    > several times and it works fine: boot with system rescue, partition
    > new hard disk, mount new partition and old partition, copy with cp -a
    > the entire filesystem an then install grub.
    > Or even better: copy with cp -a and then upgrade to 13.1
    > The question is why not upgrade to x86_64?


    :-)

    > I' know it's not officially supported (at least on previous versions).
    > I've been searching reports of success doing so, but I haven't found
    > any.
    > I't may work?


    Yes. I have done it.

    > Of course other option is a fresh install 64 bits and configuring all as
    > new (users, services, etc. ).


    But less fun ;-)

    Yes, you can do it using the full install DVD, 64 bits, and choosing
    upgrade. The partition 32 bit root partition will not be found, but you
    can manually select it. It will give a warning, but you can go ahead.

    First migrate the machine, and make sure it boots correctly. Then
    attempt that upgrade.

    Do not try a zypper dup to do it, use the dvd, system offline upgrade
    method. The procedure does not upgrade everything, it can't, because the
    DVD can not contain it all. So you have to run a query to find out which
    are the wrong arch packages.

    Ok, after the upgrade attempt booting. This is the trickiest part,
    because part of the system is 64 bits, parts are 32 bits.

    Run this:

    Code:
    rpm -q -a --queryformat "%{INSTALLTIME};%{INSTALLTIME:day}; \
    %{BUILDTIME:day}; %{NAME};%{VERSION}-%-7{RELEASE};%{arch}; \
    %{VENDOR};%{PACKAGER};%{DISTRIBUTION};%{DISTTAG}\n" \
    | sort | cut --fields="2-" --delimiter=\; \
    | tee rpmlist.csv | less -S
    
    or this:
    
    rpm -q -a --queryformat "%{INSTALLTIME}\t%{INSTALLTIME:day} \
    %{BUILDTIME:day} %-30{NAME}\t%15{VERSION}-%-7{RELEASE}\t%{arch} \
    %25{VENDOR}%25{PACKAGER} == %{DISTRIBUTION} %{DISTTAG}\n" \
    | sort | cut --fields="2-" | tee rpmlist | less -S
    one of the columns, arch, tells you which architecture the package is
    for. You have to upgrade all of them.

    Maybe, running "zypper dup" will catch many of those: I have not tried
    this particular operation on a mixed system, so I can't vouch for it,
    but if it works, saves a lot of clicking. Make sure you only have the
    four official repos active.

    Then run the above query again, find out if there are any 32 bit
    packages, and if they exist, upgrade them using yast (version tab,
    select the appropriate one).

    Good luck and have fun :-)


    (if you want success reports, I can dig out some from the mail list)

    Some docu:

    Offline upgrade
    method


    --
    Cheers / Saludos,

    Carlos E. R.
    (from 12.3 x86_64 "Dartmouth" at Telcontar)

  3. #3

    Default Re: Upgrading from 32 bits to 64 bits

    Well changing architectures can be tricky without a re install.
    If you are planning to upgrade your hardware then your software I suggest keeping 32bit so you can transition more easily.
    I see no harm in it especially if you have a PAE compliant kernel (something openSUSE can provide anyway)
    If you dont feel like re installing software then the traditional upgrade method is advised.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Spain
    Posts
    25,547

    Default Re: Upgrading from 32 bits to 64 bits

    On 2013-12-09 00:46, MadmanRB wrote:
    >
    > Well changing architectures can be tricky without a re install.
    > If you are planning to upgrade your hardware then your software I
    > suggest keeping 32bit so you can transition more easily.
    > I see no harm in it especially if you have a PAE compliant kernel
    > (something openSUSE can provide anyway)


    Not for a long time: there is a proposal to stop delivering the 32 bit
    version in two releases.

    --
    Cheers / Saludos,

    Carlos E. R.
    (from 12.3 x86_64 "Dartmouth" at Telcontar)

  5. #5

    Default Re: Upgrading from 32 bits to 64 bits

    Quote Originally Posted by robin_listas View Post
    On 2013-12-08 23:46, fperal wrote:
    >
    > I've a 12.2 32 bits system. I'm going to upgrade hardware: mobo, memory,
    > processor, HD.
    > I'm going to copy the working system to the new one, I've done this
    > several times and it works fine: boot with system rescue, partition
    > new hard disk, mount new partition and old partition, copy with cp -a
    > the entire filesystem an then install grub.
    > Or even better: copy with cp -a and then upgrade to 13.1
    > The question is why not upgrade to x86_64?


    :-)

    > I' know it's not officially supported (at least on previous versions).
    > I've been searching reports of success doing so, but I haven't found
    > any.
    > I't may work?


    Yes. I have done it.

    > Of course other option is a fresh install 64 bits and configuring all as
    > new (users, services, etc. ).


    But less fun ;-)

    Yes, you can do it using the full install DVD, 64 bits, and choosing
    upgrade. The partition 32 bit root partition will not be found, but you
    can manually select it. It will give a warning, but you can go ahead.

    First migrate the machine, and make sure it boots correctly. Then
    attempt that upgrade.

    Do not try a zypper dup to do it, use the dvd, system offline upgrade
    method. The procedure does not upgrade everything, it can't, because the
    DVD can not contain it all. So you have to run a query to find out which
    are the wrong arch packages.

    Ok, after the upgrade attempt booting. This is the trickiest part,
    because part of the system is 64 bits, parts are 32 bits.

    Run this:

    Code:
    rpm -q -a --queryformat "%{INSTALLTIME};%{INSTALLTIME:day}; \
    %{BUILDTIME:day}; %{NAME};%{VERSION}-%-7{RELEASE};%{arch}; \
    %{VENDOR};%{PACKAGER};%{DISTRIBUTION};%{DISTTAG}\n" \
    | sort | cut --fields="2-" --delimiter=\; \
    | tee rpmlist.csv | less -S
    
    or this:
    
    rpm -q -a --queryformat "%{INSTALLTIME}\t%{INSTALLTIME:day} \
    %{BUILDTIME:day} %-30{NAME}\t%15{VERSION}-%-7{RELEASE}\t%{arch} \
    %25{VENDOR}%25{PACKAGER} == %{DISTRIBUTION} %{DISTTAG}\n" \
    | sort | cut --fields="2-" | tee rpmlist | less -S
    one of the columns, arch, tells you which architecture the package is
    for. You have to upgrade all of them.

    Maybe, running "zypper dup" will catch many of those: I have not tried
    this particular operation on a mixed system, so I can't vouch for it,
    but if it works, saves a lot of clicking. Make sure you only have the
    four official repos active.
    I'm trying the rough way: "zypper dup".

    First I've updated the distro with the DVD as you said iwth "success".
    I've booted the system with a x86_64 kernel.
    I've run the query you suggested. I already have a lot of 32 bit packages, so I've changed arch=x86_68 in /etc/zypp/zypp.conf and I've done a "zypper dup" in order to try to change all the packages to x86_64.
    But zypper reports an error on any package:

    RPM failed: package ********.x86_64 is intended for a different architecture


    and does not upgrade the package.

    Is there any way to tell zypper to force change of architecture of all packages?

  6. #6

    Default Re: Upgrading from 32 bits to 64 bits

    Quote Originally Posted by fperal View Post
    I'm trying the rough way: "zypper dup".
    Don't. It won't work.
    The upgrade will fail somewhere in the middle because of the mixture of 32bit and 64bit packages.
    And your system won't even boot anymore.

    Believe me, I did that some time ago.
    I managed to fix that, by looking at the boot errors and installing the missing 32bit or 64bit packages accordingly manually with rpm, but it was tedious. And you really need to know what you are doing if you want to fix it that way.
    And I won't help you in doing that...

    Use the installation DVD and select "Upgrade an existing installation". Maybe copy it to an USB stick, so you don't have to burn a DVD.

    Is there any way to tell zypper to force change of architecture of all packages?
    Yes, have a look at /etc/zypp/zypp.conf.
    But again, "zypper dup" for changing a 32bit system into 64bit won't work.

  7. #7

    Default Re: Upgrading from 32 bits to 64 bits

    Quote Originally Posted by wolfi323 View Post
    Don't. It won't work.
    The upgrade will fail somewhere in the middle because of the mixture of 32bit and 64bit packages.
    And your system won't even boot anymore.

    Believe me, I did that some time ago.
    I managed to fix that, by looking at the boot errors and installing the missing 32bit or 64bit packages accordingly manually with rpm, but it was tedious. And you really need to know what you are doing if you want to fix it that way.
    And I won't help you in doing that...

    Use the installation DVD and select "Upgrade an existing installation". Maybe copy it to an USB stick, so you don't have to burn a DVD.

    I already did it, but there are still a lot of 32 bit packages and a lot of things don't work (yast is one of them)
    I have now a mixed system.



    Yes, have a look at /etc/zypp/zypp.conf.
    But again, "zypper dup" for changing a 32bit system into 64bit won't work.
    I was trying to use "zypper dup" to complete the change.

  8. #8

    Default Re: Upgrading from 32 bits to 64 bits

    Quote Originally Posted by fperal View Post
    I already did it, but there are still a lot of 32 bit packages and a lot of things don't work (yast is one of them)
    I have now a mixed system.
    Well.

    I was trying to use "zypper dup" to complete the change.
    Right, and that won't work because even "rpm" will fail to run now IIRC.

    Maybe your best option is to try an upgrade with the 64bit installation DVD. That _should_ fix your system.
    If that doesn't help, a fresh install would be the easiest way to recover.

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Upgrading from 32 bits to 64 bits

    Quote Originally Posted by fperal View Post
    I already did it, but there are still a lot of 32 bit packages and a lot of things don't work (yast is one of them)
    I have now a mixed system.
    Congratulations, you borked your system, like predicted. My 2 cents: spend your time on a new, fresh, clean install, and take the advice given.
    ° Appreciate my reply? Click the star and let me know why.

    ° Perfection is not gonna happen. No way.

    http://en.opensuse.org/User:Knurpht
    http://nl.opensuse.org/Gebruiker:Knurpht

  10. #10

    Default Re: Upgrading from 32 bits to 64 bits

    Quote Originally Posted by Knurpht View Post
    Congratulations, you borked your system, like predicted. My 2 cents: spend your time on a new, fresh, clean install, and take the advice given.
    I haven't broken my system. I cloned my system to a new hadrware and I did all the stuff on the clone (and I don't mind if the clone lives or dies because I'm senator palpatine ;-) )
    Surely I won't get that clone working and sure the easiest way is to do a clean install, copy the users and make all the configuration. But in the process of trying to copy and upgrade the system I'm learning a lot. That's the primary goal.

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