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Thread: kdesudo is missing

  1. #1

    Question kdesudo is missing

    Hello,

    Does anyone know why kdesudo is not in OpenSuSE. Looking through KDE forums and docs, it has not been removed from KDE, so it seems that the OpenSuSE devs must despise kdesudo, but they either don't hate sudo or were blocked from removing it as it is there and yast has a module for configuring sudo.

    I ave tried installing a kdesudo rpm from the build service, but it did not work as expected, so I removed it. Has anyone gotten kdesudo working? If so, please provide some tips.

    Some have posted that you can do everything kdesudo can with kdesu, bit no one ever offers information on how, so here are some things that I can do with kdesudo.

    1) I can give users access to specific things that normally require root access, but allow them to do these things without knowing the root password. Obviously, I would not give them access to anything that can change the root password or other users passwords.

    2) Admins can do anything using their own passwords. If you can't trust your admins, then you have an issue that has nothing to do with Linux, OpenSuSE or KDE to resolve.


    Thanks,

    Rhongomiant

  2. #2
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    Smile Re: kdesudo is missing

    Quote Originally Posted by Rhongomiant View Post
    Hello,

    Does anyone know why kdesudo is not in OpenSuSE. Looking through KDE forums and docs, it has not been removed from KDE, so it seems that the OpenSuSE devs must despise kdesudo, but they either don't hate sudo or were blocked from removing it as it is there and yast has a module for configuring sudo.

    I ave tried installing a kdesudo rpm from the build service, but it did not work as expected, so I removed it. Has anyone gotten kdesudo working? If so, please provide some tips.

    Some have posted that you can do everything kdesudo can with kdesu, bit no one ever offers information on how, so here are some things that I can do with kdesudo.

    1) I can give users access to specific things that normally require root access, but allow them to do these things without knowing the root password. Obviously, I would not give them access to anything that can change the root password or other users passwords.

    2) Admins can do anything using their own passwords. If you can't trust your admins, then you have an issue that has nothing to do with Linux, OpenSuSE or KDE to resolve.


    Thanks,

    Rhongomiant
    Why not use "kdesu" instead which is included?

    Thank You,
    My Blog: https://forums.opensuse.org/blogs/jdmcdaniel3/

    Software efficiency halves every 18 months, thus compensating for Moore's Law

    Its James again from Austin, Texas

  3. #3

    Default Re: kdesudo is missing

    Well, kdesudo is not and never was part of KDE AFAIK.
    kdesu is.

    But you can configure kdesu to use sudo instead of su, see here: Default kdesu to use sudo and not su | Free Techie Blog
    It then respects the settings in /etc/sudoers where you should be able to configure the things you mention.

    Hope that helps.

  4. #4

    Question Re: kdesudo is missing

    wolfi323,

    Thanks for the response. None of the items on that post allowed me to use sudo. I tried running the kwriteconfig command making sure I used double - and I tried editing the kdesurc files directly and when kdesu opened a prompt asking for my password and not root's password, yast2 would never open. In fact noting i tried opened. I have a feeling that kdesu has been hard coded to use su and not sudo for at least a number of operations.


    Thanks,

    Rhongomiant

  5. #5

    Default Re: kdesudo is missing

    Quote Originally Posted by Rhongomiant View Post
    wolfi323,

    Thanks for the response. None of the items on that post allowed me to use sudo. I tried running the kwriteconfig command making sure I used double - and I tried editing the kdesurc files directly and when kdesu opened a prompt asking for my password and not root's password, yast2 would never open. In fact noting i tried opened. I have a feeling that kdesu has been hard coded to use su and not sudo for at least a number of operations.
    No, this works fine here. If you want to run a programm as a different user, "su" is hardcoded, yes. But for root you can use "sudo" as well by that method in this article.

    You have to kill kdesud first though, for the setting to work (or logout/login).

    Does "sudo" itself work for you?

    If kdesu asked for _your_ password instead of root's that would be an indication that sudo is used I would say, since sudo can be configured to ask for the current user's password instead of the target user's (and that's the default on Ubuntu f.e. AFAIK)

  6. #6

    Question Re: kdesudo is missing

    wolfi323,


    Something is definitely broken for me. This is what I get when I set kdesu to use sudo and try to launch something with kdesu.

    sudo: rhongomiant : TTY=pts/13 ; PWD=/home/rhongomiant ; USER=root ; COMMAND=/usr/lib64/kde4/libexec/kdesu_stub -
    sudo: pam_unix(sudo:session): session opened for user root by (uid=0)
    sudo: pam_unix(sudo:session): session closed for user root
    su: pam_unix(su:auth): authentication failure; logname= uid=1000 euid=0 tty=pts/13 ruser=rhongomiant rhost= user=root
    su: FAILED SU (to root) rhongomiant on /dev/pts/13
    sudo: gkr-pam: couldn't get the password from user: Authentication failure
    sudo: pam_unix(sudo:auth): conversation failed
    sudo: pam_unix(sudo:auth): auth could not identify password for [rhongomiant]


    I know I am entering the correct user password and I have also tested entering the wrong password and that is a whole other endeavor. The kdesu password entry dialog remains on the screen and it is locked up not allowing me to do anything. It never tells me I entered the incorrect password nor does it allow me to attempt to enter another password. I have to kill the process manually. Below is the only log entry I get when I enter the incorrect password.


    sudo: pam_unix(sudo:auth): authentication failure; logname= uid=1000 euid=0 tty=/dev/pts/13 ruser=rhongomiant rhost= user=rhongomiant


    I have none of these issues when su is used for kdesu. I am running OpenSuSE 12.3 x86_64 and below is the information related to KDE and kdesu.

    Qt: 4.8.4
    KDE Development Platform: 4.10.5 "release 1"
    KDE su: 1.0



    Thanks,

    Rhongomiant

  7. #7

    Default Re: kdesudo is missing

    So does sudo itself work? (try to run "sudo whoami" to test f.e.)

    sudo: gkr-pam: couldn't get the password from user: Authentication failure
    gkr-pam is short for gnome-keyring-pam, so something seems to be wrong with that. Maybe try to uninstall it? You shouldn't need it on KDE.

  8. #8

    Question Re: kdesudo is missing

    Quote Originally Posted by wolfi323 View Post
    So does sudo itself work? (try to run "sudo whoami" to test f.e.)


    gkr-pam is short for gnome-keyring-pam, so something seems to be wrong with that. Maybe try to uninstall it? You shouldn't need it on KDE.

    wolfi323,

    Sorry, I know you have asked about sudo a couple of times and I kept forgetting to respond to that. Yes sudo works fine. For example, I can sudo -i to get to root, sudo yast to access the ncurses yast, etc.

    I will look in to removing gnome-keyring-pam.


    Thanks,

    Rhongomiant

  9. #9
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    Default Re: kdesudo is missing

    There is an unsupported kdesudo in the Build Service. If you must have this, you can add it from there. You can also make a feature request, but it would be a while before it's added to the standard repo.

    Index of /repositories/home:/steffens:/lvermgeo:/client/openSUSE_12.3

  10. #10

    Default Re: kdesudo is missing

    Quote Originally Posted by jdmcdaniel3 View Post
    Why not use "kdesu" instead which is included?
    Because that requires using the root password, which is completely inappropriate. There are many administrators per machine. Using root loses the tracking of what individuals do. If I am an authorized admin of a machine, and have sudo permission, do not make the enterprise admin share the root password with everyone.

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