Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: How can a partition be full if du does not show it is?

  1. #1

    Default How can a partition be full if du does not show it is?

    On one of my systems, the root partition is full:

    Code:
    snip:˜ # df -h
        Filesystem      Size  Used Avail Use% Mounted on
        rootfs           11G  9.3G     0 100% /
        devtmpfs        744M   36K  744M   1% /dev
        tmpfs           751M     0  751M   0% /dev/shm
        tmpfs           751M  296K  751M   1% /run
        /dev/sda7        11G  9.3G     0 100% /
        tmpfs           751M     0  751M   0% /sys/fs/cgroup
        tmpfs           751M  296K  751M   1% /var/lock
        tmpfs           751M  296K  751M   1% /var/run
        tmpfs           751M     0  751M   0% /media
        /dev/sda5       151M   39M  104M  28% /boot
        /dev/sda8       4.4G  207M  3.3G   6% /home
    But du does not show near 9.3 gigabyte of usage:

    Code:
    snip:~ # du /* -s -h
        5.2M    /bin
        34M    /boot
        36K    /dev
        22M    /etc
        199M    /home
        154M    /lib
        20M    /lib64
        0    /media
        0    /mnt
        0    /opt
        0    /proc
        7.9M    /root
        288K    /run
        7.1M    /sbin
        0    /selinux
        756K    /srv
        0    /sys
        0    /tmp
        1.6G    /usr
        1.1G    /var
    It only accounts for about 3 gigabytes.

    How can that be?
    Where should I look for the remaining 6+ gigabytes of used gigabytes?

    I'm using openSUSE 12.2:

    Code:
    snip:~ # cat /etc/SuSE-release
        openSUSE 12.2 (x86_64)
        VERSION = 12.2
        CODENAME = Mantis

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Spain
    Posts
    25,547

    Default Re: How can a partition be full if du does not show it is?

    On 2013-09-08 18:36, jpluimers wrote:
    > It only accounts for about 3 gigabytes.
    >
    > How can that be?


    Is it an btrfs filesystem?

    > Where should I look for the remaining 6+ gigabytes of used gigabytes?


    If the answer to the previous one is yes, then in snapshots.

    Code:
    
    > http://doc.opensuse.org/documentation/html/openSUSE/opensuse-reference/cha.snapper.html
    --
    Cheers / Saludos,

    Carlos E. R.
    (from 12.3 x86_64 "Dartmouth" at Telcontar)

  3. #3

    Default Re: How can a partition be full if du does not show it is?

    Quote Originally Posted by robin_listas View Post
    On 2013-09-08 18:36, jpluimers wrote:
    > It only accounts for about 3 gigabytes.
    >
    > How can that be?


    Is it an btrfs filesystem?
    Yes, you are right.
    I never realized it would install the experimental btrfs by default.
    > Where should I look for the remaining 6+ gigabytes of used gigabytes?

    If the answer to the previous one is yes, then in snapshots.

    Code:
     http://doc.opensuse.org/documentation/html/openSUSE/opensuse-reference/cha.snapper.html
    The thing I cannot find in the documentation so soon, but which I'm going to need:

    How can I delete old snapshots?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    5,500

    Default Re: How can a partition be full if du does not show it is?

    Quote Originally Posted by jpluimers View Post
    Yes, you are right.
    I never realized it would install the experimental btrfs by default.


    The thing I cannot find in the documentation so soon, but which I'm going to need:

    How can I delete old snapshots?
    The official documentation supplied with 12.2 should be installed at /usr/share/doc/manual/opensuse-manuals_en/index.html, and you want "Reference", chapter II. Advanced Administration, sub-section 4. Snapshots/Rollback with Snapper.

    I doubt Btrfs was installed by default, even to the root filesystem.

  5. #5

    Default Re: How can a partition be full if du does not show it is?

    Quote Originally Posted by jpluimers View Post
    How can I delete old snapshots?
    Just read NerdyRoom™
    Code:
    for i in `seq 1 4400`; do snapper delete $i; done
    The low/high number are chosen from
    Code:
    snapper list
    so that some 50 snapshots are left.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    16,884

    Default Re: How can a partition be full if du does not show it is?

    On Sun, 08 Sep 2013 18:26:02 +0000, consused wrote:

    > I doubt Btrfs was installed by default, even to the root filesystem.


    It certainly wouldn't have been selected by default, given the current
    discussion about whether or not to make it the default for the first time
    in 13.1.

    Jim
    --
    Jim Henderson
    openSUSE Forums Administrator
    Forum Use Terms & Conditions at http://tinyurl.com/openSUSE-T-C

  7. #7

    Default Re: How can a partition be full if du does not show it is?

    Quote Originally Posted by hendersj View Post
    On Sun, 08 Sep 2013 18:26:02 +0000, consused wrote:

    > I doubt Btrfs was installed by default, even to the root filesystem.


    It certainly wouldn't have been selected by default, given the current
    discussion about whether or not to make it the default for the first time
    in 13.1.
    Indeed: you are right.

    Must have ticked that by accident without even noticing. This was a rarely used system, for which I could not see anything back in the notes about enabling btrfs.

    I checked against some other 12.2 systems I use more often (and were installed at roughly the same time) too. Those did not have btrfs enabled.

    Some EBCAK somewhere on my side (:

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Spain
    Posts
    25,547

    Default Re: How can a partition be full if du does not show it is?

    On 2013-09-08 20:36, jpluimers wrote:
    > so that some 50 snapshots are left.


    You can see the snapshots under the directory /.snapshots

    --
    Cheers / Saludos,

    Carlos E. R.
    (from 12.3 x86_64 "Dartmouth" at Telcontar)

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •