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Thread: Uninstalling Thunderbird

  1. #1

    Default Uninstalling Thunderbird

    Hi.

    I would uninstall Thunderbird on my opensuse 12.3 64bit system

    I encountered, that Yast didn't totally removed all instances.

    Or said in windows term, there's leftovers.

    Why is it so?, I had the idea, that it was only windows that have such issue ?.

    /Erik

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
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    Germany
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    Default AW: Uninstalling Thunderbird

    Quote Originally Posted by erikja View Post
    Hi.

    I would uninstall Thunderbird on my opensuse 12.3 64bit system

    I encountered, that Yast didn't totally removed all instances.

    Or said in windows term, there's leftovers.

    Why is it so?, I had the idea, that it was only windows that have such issue ?.

    /Erik
    What is left over exactly?
    zypp it...

  3. #3
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    Posts
    10,730

    Default Re: Uninstalling Thunderbird

    On 05/01/2013 08:06 PM, erikja wrote:
    > Why is it so?


    probably because you didn't tell YaST/zypper to remove all
    dependencies....which did you use?

    --
    dd
    openSUSE®, the "German Engineered Automobile" of operating systems!

  4. #4

    Default Re: AW: Uninstalling Thunderbird

    Quote Originally Posted by zerum View Post
    What is left over exactly?
    Oh sorry, I can't remember it now.

  5. #5

    Default Re: Uninstalling Thunderbird

    Quote Originally Posted by DenverD View Post
    On 05/01/2013 08:06 PM, erikja wrote:
    > Why is it so?


    probably because you didn't tell YaST/zypper to remove all
    dependencies....which did you use?

    --
    dd
    openSUSE®, the "German Engineered Automobile" of operating systems!
    I did right click in Yast, and choosed to delete

  6. #6
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    1,479

    Default Re: Uninstalling Thunderbird

    If you take off a program you may be left with a "leftover" in the /home directory. It will be hidden file (in your case probably .thunderbird with your data in it). This is not really an error. It happens that you have to take off and re-install a program that for example encountered a problem after a sever crash or disk-fault of a sector. Now if un-install would trigger the removal of private user data, this would be a problematic event. Sometimes there are also a few temporary files left over, however in the mean programs leave if every some directories that hold config data or mail etc.
    BTW one of the idea of using Akonadi was that different programs would be able to use the very same database, reducing the need of extra directories for private data and avoid unwanted redundancy.
    Now if you compare this to windows, what is NOT left over is a growing charge of garbage inside the registry that slows down the system and after a while can lead to problems. The system therefore is not ageing. So the install and take off process of programs in Linux is efficient, you have only the fact of few private data.
    If dependencies are not direct and you install a specific plug-in or supplement to a program it may be that these are "left over" after un-install of the original program. This is often so if the supplemental program is able to work also with other software or as stand alone solution.

    Typical example could be my-spell dictionaries or also if you try: install google earth. It will trigger the install of qt3 (by itself able to be standalone and words with other applications) and make (which is a tool for installing software (compliation). Now if you uninstall google-earth out of the 8 packages that are triggered by the install, 5 are "left overs" but they are still regularly installed. When you want to have a complete clean of everything (typically after "trial and error" of a programme you will know what day you performed the install. Yast offers a chronology allowing you to check which package were installed and if you wish to take them off.

    All these facts are unlike windows not "clutter" but functional. It is like you would buy a pink barby horse, with a nice white plastic saddle and decide to buy also two pairs of roller-skates for the hoofs of the poor animal. Now if you decide to get rid of the horse, the saddle would be take away too as it depends on the horse but the skates may stay because you would be able to use them also without the horse. The system therefore does not know by itself that you wanted to get rid of them too. They are functional and do not slow down. You only decide if they are now unwanted. The system can not.

    P.S. if you like to see a nice example of interaction of programs try "amor" a little worm that runs long your screen. It offers to programmers to use it to publish their tool tips (for their programs). So imagine you use it and get rid of *one* of the programs that use it. Amor would be then in your definition a "left over" as it would stay, because it can be stand alone or work with other programs.

    Just "clicking away" security warnings about a change in repo signature ? Not able to control?
    Then please vote for
    https://features.opensuse.org/312047
    openSUSE should have an efficient web of trust.

  7. #7

    Default Re: Uninstalling Thunderbird

    Quote Originally Posted by stakanov View Post
    If you take off a program you may be left with a "leftover" in the /home directory. It will be hidden file (in your case probably .thunderbird with your data in it). This is not really an error. It happens that you have to take off and re-install a program that for example encountered a problem after a sever crash or disk-fault of a sector. Now if un-install would trigger the removal of private user data, this would be a problematic event. Sometimes there are also a few temporary files left over, however in the mean programs leave if every some directories that hold config data or mail etc.
    BTW one of the idea of using Akonadi was that different programs would be able to use the very same database, reducing the need of extra directories for private data and avoid unwanted redundancy.
    Now if you compare this to windows, what is NOT left over is a growing charge of garbage inside the registry that slows down the system and after a while can lead to problems. The system therefore is not ageing. So the install and take off process of programs in Linux is efficient, you have only the fact of few private data.
    If dependencies are not direct and you install a specific plug-in or supplement to a program it may be that these are "left over" after un-install of the original program. This is often so if the supplemental program is able to work also with other software or as stand alone solution.

    Typical example could be my-spell dictionaries or also if you try: install google earth. It will trigger the install of qt3 (by itself able to be standalone and words with other applications) and make (which is a tool for installing software (compliation). Now if you uninstall google-earth out of the 8 packages that are triggered by the install, 5 are "left overs" but they are still regularly installed. When you want to have a complete clean of everything (typically after "trial and error" of a programme you will know what day you performed the install. Yast offers a chronology allowing you to check which package were installed and if you wish to take them off.

    All these facts are unlike windows not "clutter" but functional. It is like you would buy a pink barby horse, with a nice white plastic saddle and decide to buy also two pairs of roller-skates for the hoofs of the poor animal. Now if you decide to get rid of the horse, the saddle would be take away too as it depends on the horse but the skates may stay because you would be able to use them also without the horse. The system therefore does not know by itself that you wanted to get rid of them too. They are functional and do not slow down. You only decide if they are now unwanted. The system can not.

    P.S. if you like to see a nice example of interaction of programs try "amor" a little worm that runs long your screen. It offers to programmers to use it to publish their tool tips (for their programs). So imagine you use it and get rid of *one* of the programs that use it. Amor would be then in your definition a "left over" as it would stay, because it can be stand alone or work with other programs.


    Hi and thanks for this reply.

    I wish, that I have saved what I found after the total removal I did.

    But I can do it again the uninstall, and then show what I mean.

    For instance, after I uninstalled Thunderbird with Yast, and reinstalled it, all my account details was left, and
    active again after the removal.

    So it was not a total removal!.

    After I searched/removed leftovers, I could again install Thunderbird, and now I should set up my account again.

    /Erik

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Spain
    Posts
    25,547

    Default Re: Uninstalling Thunderbird

    On 2013-05-01 23:06, erikja wrote:

    > Hi and thanks for this reply.
    >
    > I wish, that I have saved what I found after the total removal I did.
    >
    > But I can do it again the uninstall, and then show what I mean.
    >
    > For instance, after I uninstalled Thunderbird with Yast, and
    > reinstalled it, all my account details was left, and
    > active again after the removal.


    This is intentional, and documented behaviour.


    > After I searched/removed leftovers, I could again install Thunderbird,
    > and now I should set up my account again.


    You could simply:

    stop thunderbird
    remove the ".thunderbird" directory on your home.
    start thunderbird

    and it would have worked perfectly.

    --
    Cheers / Saludos,

    Carlos E. R.
    (from 12.1 x86_64 "Asparagus" at Telcontar)

  9. #9
    Join Date
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    Space Colony Lagrange Point 22° à, 77° Ƅ, 56° ɤ, 99° ɜ
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    Default Re: Uninstalling Thunderbird

    Quote Originally Posted by stakanov View Post
    If you take off a program you may be left with a "leftover" in the /home directory. It will be hidden file (in your case probably .thunderbird with your data in it). This is not really an error. It happens that you have to take off and re-install a program that for example encountered a problem after a sever crash or disk-fault of a sector. Now if un-install would trigger the removal of private user data, this would be a problematic event. Sometimes there are also a few temporary files left over, however in the mean programs leave if every some directories that hold config data or mail etc.
    BTW one of the idea of using Akonadi was that different programs would be able to use the very same database, reducing the need of extra directories for private data and avoid unwanted redundancy.
    Now if you compare this to windows, what is NOT left over is a growing charge of garbage inside the registry that slows down the system and after a while can lead to problems. The system therefore is not ageing. So the install and take off process of programs in Linux is efficient, you have only the fact of few private data.
    If dependencies are not direct and you install a specific plug-in or supplement to a program it may be that these are "left over" after un-install of the original program. This is often so if the supplemental program is able to work also with other software or as stand alone solution.

    Typical example could be my-spell dictionaries or also if you try: install google earth. It will trigger the install of qt3 (by itself able to be standalone and words with other applications) and make (which is a tool for installing software (compliation). Now if you uninstall google-earth out of the 8 packages that are triggered by the install, 5 are "left overs" but they are still regularly installed. When you want to have a complete clean of everything (typically after "trial and error" of a programme you will know what day you performed the install. Yast offers a chronology allowing you to check which package were installed and if you wish to take them off.

    All these facts are unlike windows not "clutter" but functional. It is like you would buy a pink barby horse, with a nice white plastic saddle and decide to buy also two pairs of roller-skates for the hoofs of the poor animal. Now if you decide to get rid of the horse, the saddle would be take away too as it depends on the horse but the skates may stay because you would be able to use them also without the horse. The system therefore does not know by itself that you wanted to get rid of them too. They are functional and do not slow down. You only decide if they are now unwanted. The system can not.

    P.S. if you like to see a nice example of interaction of programs try "amor" a little worm that runs long your screen. It offers to programmers to use it to publish their tool tips (for their programs). So imagine you use it and get rid of *one* of the programs that use it. Amor would be then in your definition a "left over" as it would stay, because it can be stand alone or work with other programs.

    What is the deal with pony and barbie ?
    GNOME Version 3.20.2
    openSUSE Leap 42.3 64-bit

    www.vazhavandan.blogspot.com

  10. #10

    Default Re: Uninstalling Thunderbird

    Quote Originally Posted by robin_listas View Post
    On 2013-05-01 23:06, erikja wrote:

    > Hi and thanks for this reply.
    >
    > I wish, that I have saved what I found after the total removal I did.
    >
    > But I can do it again the uninstall, and then show what I mean.
    >
    > For instance, after I uninstalled Thunderbird with Yast, and
    > reinstalled it, all my account details was left, and
    > active again after the removal.


    This is intentional, and documented behaviour.

    Where is that documented?, link.


    > After I searched/removed leftovers, I could again install Thunderbird,
    > and now I should set up my account again.


    You could simply:

    stop thunderbird
    remove the ".thunderbird" directory on your home.
    start thunderbird

    and it would have worked perfectly.

    Thanks Carlos
    --
    Cheers / Saludos,

    Carlos E. R.
    (from 12.1 x86_64 "Asparagus" at Telcontar)

    /Erik opensuse 12.3

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