Page 1 of 4 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 36

Thread: Well, the future has arrived !

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    302

    Default Well, the future has arrived !

    We go live tomorrow with 400 opensuse 12.1 machines.
    For the students, Windows is no more ... Wish us luck.

    :-)

    M

  2. #2
    dd@home.dk NNTP User

    Default Re: Well, the future has arrived !

    > We go live tomorrow with 400 opensuse 12.1 machines.
    > For the students, Windows is no more ... Wish us luck.


    good luck!! expect growing pains...and smile through them..

    i know you know this, but i am compelled to say it anyway: make certain
    that _no_ student has the root password!

    they will love Linux . . . eventually..

    Have a lot of fun, and send questions as needed!!

    --
    dd

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Netherlands
    Posts
    25,606

    Default Re: Well, the future has arrived !

    All the best!!
    Henk van Velden

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Uruguay
    Posts
    737

    Default Re: Well, the future has arrived !

    Have a lot of fun!!! and don't forget to secure your grub

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    1,376

    Default Re: Well, the future has arrived !

    That's great. How did you decide to go with openSUSE?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    302

    Default Re: Well, the future has arrived !

    Well, all things considered, that went quite well ... Everything worked .. I still have a job

    Let's see how tomorrow goes :-)

    M

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Germany
    Posts
    4,654

    Default Re: Well, the future has arrived !

    Am 04.09.2012 17:56, schrieb interele:
    >
    > Well, all things considered, that went quite well ... Everything worked
    > .. I still have a job
    >
    > Let's see how tomorrow goes :-)
    >
    > M
    >

    Which organisation is that if we are allowed to ask?


    --
    PC: oS 12.2 x86_64 | i7-2600@3.40GHz | 16GB | KDE 4.8.4 | GeForce GT 420
    ThinkPad E320: oS 12.2 x86_64 | i3@2.30GHz | 8GB | KDE 4.8.4 | HD 3000
    eCAFE 800: oS 12.1 i586 | AMD Geode LX 800@500MHz | 512MB | KDE 3.5.10

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Chicago, IL
    Posts
    2

    Default Re: Well, the future has arrived !

    [QUOTE=martin_helm;2483687]Am 04.09.2012 17:56, schrieb interele:
    >
    > Well, all things considered, that went quite well ... Everything worked
    > .. I still have a job
    >
    > Let's see how tomorrow goes :-)
    >
    > M
    >

    Which organisation is that if we are allowed to ask?

    This is a great story. I'd like to know this too. With openSUSE Summit in Orlando coming up September 21-23 and openSUSE Conference in Prague coming up October 20-23, this is a story that should be told at the conference. If you can't mention organization name, can you at least give us your region so we can figure out if we can get you to one of the two conferences?

    Bryen M Yunashko
    openSUSE Summit co-chair

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    302

    Default Re: Well, the future has arrived !

    All promo stuff needs the Head Teachers OK ( so you can guess we are a school )

    I will talk to him and get back to you

    What sort of things do you want to say ?

    M

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    302

    Default Re: Well, the future has arrived !

    Quote Originally Posted by chief_sealth View Post
    That's great. How did you decide to go with openSUSE?
    The process went like this ... this is the shortish version as this whole process took a while
    Also, as I now at home with a VERY large glass of wine I may ramble a bit ;-)

    Background - we have 400 student machines ( openSuse 12.1 ) and 170 staff machines ( staying with XP )

    I originally wanted to go completely Linux but I figured that as teachers can be quite conservative a two stage
    process would be better - get the students working well as they cope with change better and then sell the idea
    to the teachers in a year or two. There is a whole sub story about document interchange and standards ... but I
    digress

    As we have so many PC's and only 3 of us ( schools everywhere are under resourced ! ) the fundamental idea
    behind Linux in the first place is to build a system that we can afford and support. To that end , we don't have the luxury
    of being able to test everything to death. Not only are we doing the PCs and servers but we do the VLE, the email
    our cloud, a couple of web sites, projectors, cabling .. in fact anything with a plug on it is considered ours. This is
    not just a rant as it had a bearing on the final choice.

    When we started Mint wasn't as big as it is now so we didn't consider that ( we revisited that later along with our
    other choices and stayed with openSuSE ) So we looked at the 'big 3' of the time Ubuntu, Fedora and openSuse

    Now:

    1 We don't have the manpower to test extensively
    2 We would like students to have the best desktop experience ie the latest or at least a fairly late release ( eye candy is a feature )

    As we always make sure we have at least two more machines than the biggest class size in our IT rooms we can test
    the client end easily. For example when 12.2 comes out we can put a couple of 12.2 machines in each class and let the
    students test/break them. If anything bad happens we just put a broken sign on them and roll back to 12.1 in the evening. It's
    very low risk.

    Server/backend machines however are a different story. If I worked in a big organisation ( as I did previously ) we would
    test every release to death before rolling it out. We can't do that so we have to rely on someone else doing most of the work
    ( we still test ) So that basically the client end and the server end need a different approach. Say on any distros forums
    'update x broke y' then they will say 'wait for update z and it'll fix it' which is fair enough on a client - not so good on the server.

    This leads you to the idea that you need one of the following

    Ubuntu on the client and Ubuntu LTS on the server
    Fedora on the client and Redhat/Centos on the server
    openSuse on the client and Suse on the server

    You obviously could mix and match it you wanted but we didn't

    We wanted a good KDE distro. 1) because although it's much more powerful than windows it looks vaguely similar
    2) Our initial user tests proved KDE was much easier to use and much more flexible despite a million configuration options and
    3) I like KDE and if you are going to put your arse on the line it might as well be for something you like ;-)

    That sort of put Ubuntu out of the picture. Fedora is good, in fact our original tests were with Fedora and Centos
    Since both Suse and Redhat do servers to schools at peanuts the cost isn't an issue. What it came down to is
    practicalities and support.

    Connecting clients to servers in both systems is pretty similar but Yast makes things quite a bit easier.
    OpenSuse also takes a more pragmatic approach to things like codecs, fonts and binary blobs. The world
    isn't always a clear cut as RS would like ;-) As my 'customer base' is 1200 11-18 year old girls, pink backgrounds
    and wobbly windows are a big selling point. In fact, last term when we were doing out final tests and training
    a year 8 said to me when we were demonstrating KDE 'I'm in love with this computer' so I figured then that
    we had made the right choice both in openSUSE and KDE.

    Support is another issue. If you compare the support for the three setups we found openSuse the best ( not
    always the most polite ) but the most effective. ( I refer back to my rant ) Often during this whole process I
    asked some really dumb questions ( hopefully not because I am dumb ) but because we are run off our feet.
    I always got an answer, often prefixed by 'you are an idiot' but an answer nevertheless.

    Our final setup is openSuse clients and Suse file servers, ldap servers and web servers. Of all the set ups
    we tried this was the easiest to get working. With nearly 600 machines and all the other stuff we are always
    going to be flying by the seat of our pants so to speak. With Windows you go out and buy a Mark Minasi Windows
    blah blah book and read it from cover to cover and you are pretty much good to go. Linux is different, at the
    end of the day openSuse is the one we felt most comfortable with. If something nasty happens that's outside
    of my knowledge I feel confident that I'll quickly get help.

    Summary:-
    KDE
    Integration with the server end
    Forums
    Yast

    best wishes

    M

Page 1 of 4 123 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •