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Thread: Installing openSUSE 12.1 on Intel Matrix Strorage (fake RAID) aside with Windows 7

  1. #1

    Default Installing openSUSE 12.1 on Intel Matrix Strorage (fake RAID) aside with Windows 7

    Hello all,

    I am running a Windows 7 64bit machine on a 2-disk-RAID0, which is setup through the motherboard's Intel Matrix Storage RAID functionality (=fake-RAID):


    1. hard drive 1: & hard drive 2 are bundled to RAID0-volume1
    2. RAID0-volume1 has 3 partitions
      1. partition1: Windows7
      2. partition2: data
      3. partition3: <empty>. I want to install Linux here.


    I read that Intel Matrix Storage support has been introduced to Linux via dm-raid and md-raid and that I am supposed to be able to install on such a fake raid volume.

    I tried to do so and the openSUSE 12.1 installer right at the beginning of the installation process correctly reported that he found an Intel Matrix RAID volume and asked me if I would like to use it (Yes).

    But when it comes to partitioning, I do not see the RAID0-volume1 and it's partitions anywhere. Instead, I see both single hard drives:


    1. hard drive 1: shows to have 2 partitions
    2. hard drive 2: shows to be unpartitioned


    How do I do the trick to be able to install openSUSE correctly on partition3 of RAID0-volume1 correctly?

    Thank you for any input / help / hint!

    Cheers
    rootpower

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Installing openSUSE 12.1 on Intel Matrix Strorage (fake RAID) aside with Windows 7

    Quote Originally Posted by rootpower View Post
    Hello all,

    I am running a Windows 7 64bit machine on a 2-disk-RAID0, which is setup through the motherboard's Intel Matrix Storage RAID functionality (=fake-RAID):


    1. hard drive 1: & hard drive 2 are bundled to RAID0-volume1
    2. RAID0-volume1 has 3 partitions
      1. partition1: Windows7
      2. partition2: data
      3. partition3: <empty>. I want to install Linux here.



    I read that Intel Matrix Storage support has been introduced to Linux via dm-raid and md-raid and that I am supposed to be able to install on such a fake raid volume.

    I tried to do so and the openSUSE 12.1 installer right at the beginning of the installation process correctly reported that he found an Intel Matrix RAID volume and asked me if I would like to use it (Yes).

    But when it comes to partitioning, I do not see the RAID0-volume1 and it's partitions anywhere. Instead, I see both single hard drives:


    1. hard drive 1: shows to have 2 partitions
    2. hard drive 2: shows to be unpartitioned


    How do I do the trick to be able to install openSUSE correctly on partition3 of RAID0-volume1 correctly?

    Thank you for any input / help / hint!

    Cheers
    rootpower
    My suggestion in such a situation is to acquire another hard driver. It could be internal or an external USB 2.0 hard drive (Not USB 3) from which you could boot a fully patched copy of openSUSE and very likely read and use your Fake RAID setup. Its possible with openSUSE 12.2 and the new Grub 2, things may be different, but not for openSUSE 12.1 in my opinion. We can provide plenty of help on booting from another hard drive and loading up your RAID setup afterwards.

    Thank You,
    My Blog: https://forums.opensuse.org/blogs/jdmcdaniel3/

    Software efficiency halves every 18 months, thus compensating for Moore's Law

    Its James again from Austin, Texas

  3. #3

    Default Re: Installing openSUSE 12.1 on Intel Matrix Strorage (fake RAID) aside with Windows 7

    Hi jdmcdaniel3,
    Thank you for spending your time for helping me!

    Quote Originally Posted by jdmcdaniel3 View Post
    My suggestion in such a situation is to acquire another hard driver. It could be internal or an external USB 2.0 hard drive (Not USB 3) from which you could boot a fully patched copy of openSUSE and very likely read and use your Fake RAID setup. Its possible with openSUSE 12.2 and the new Grub 2, things may be different, but not for openSUSE 12.1 in my opinion. We can provide plenty of help on booting from another hard drive and loading up your RAID setup afterwards.
    Ok, I plugged an external USB-2.0 hard disk onto the machine and performed a standard openSUSE 12.1 (64bit/KDE) installation. When looking onto my disks via YAST/Partitioner, I still see the same result, as before:


    • hard drive 1: shows to have 2 partitions
    • hard drive 2: shows to be unpartitioned
    Quote Originally Posted by jdmcdaniel3 View Post
    a fully patched copy of openSUSE
    What do you mean with "fully patched"? What must I do to be able to mount the RAID0 volume?
    Can it be that Windows 7 used some kind of proprietary disk label so to be able to use the fake RAID, which is not compatible to Linux / openSUSE?

    Thanks for any feedback!

    Best regards
    rootpower

  4. #4
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    Smile Re: Installing openSUSE 12.1 on Intel Matrix Strorage (fake RAID) aside with Windows 7

    So the best I can offer is to have a look at the many RAID tutorials you can find for Linux:

    https://raid.wiki.kernel.org/index.php/Linux_Raid

    The Software-RAID HOWTO

    How to configure RAID in Linux - Tutorial

    Further, since RAID support is based on the Linux Kernel, the newer installed might provide better support. Upgrading the kernel can be done in several ways, but I can offer a bash script that can do the deed for you that is located here:

    S.A.K.C. - SUSE Automated Kernel Compiler - Version 2.75 - Blogs - openSUSE Forums

    You can go up to kernel linux-3.5.1.tar.bz2 , but I think I would try out linux-3.2.27.tar.bz2, linux-3.3.8.tar.bz2 or linux-3.4.8.tar.bz2 in order first. When using SAKC, your original 3.1.10 kernel is not removed and in my opinion should be kept in place. When kernel 3.4 came out, a new setting was introduced that when not set, will keep the openSUSE Firewall from starting properly, but feel free to ask for advice on that, but kernel 3.2 and 3.3 did not have this problem and kernel 3.5 is the same as 3.4 on this one issue. I am using kernel 3.5.1 right now in openSUSE 12.1 and it is working great. I had to install kernel 3.2 a while back just to get my new sound card to work and so the kernel is where most hardware support comes from and the newer the kernel the better. On the other hand, some things are proprietary such as the nVIDIA and AMD video drivers which may require an external driver be installed. The jist of all of this is it does not hurt to download and try kernel 3.3.8 for instance using SAKC and see if it makes any difference.

    Thank You,
    My Blog: https://forums.opensuse.org/blogs/jdmcdaniel3/

    Software efficiency halves every 18 months, thus compensating for Moore's Law

    Its James again from Austin, Texas

  5. #5

    Default Re: Installing openSUSE 12.1 on Intel Matrix Strorage (fake RAID) aside with Windows 7

    I run a RAID 0+1, (for a total of 1 TB) multibooting win7 and Suse. Booting can be done, but its kinda hard for to decipher which drive and partition is the "real" one where you want to put your OS. There is the physical and logical partitions and I had totake deap breaths and read everything twice so as to not format a partition with real data on it, and I'm a geek.

    I have a boot partition, a swap partition, a partition for each OS, AND (yeah, its alot- but not overkill) a large partition for all of my stuff. If windows dies- infection/whatever- all I have to do is re-install and point to "my documents", same with Suse.

    So to make it simpler, instead of making all these partitions and trying to deal with them at boot- I took a 4 GB memory stick, made a small partition for boot (256 MB- and I think that is like 5 times more space than necissary)- stuck GRUB on it. Grub reads fake RAIDs and can point to your other, logical partitions. A 2GB Swap partition, and let Win 7 take the third partition for its "ready boost"- which we know is them just biting Linux's Swap partion tech.

    Poof! 3 (one uneccisary "ready-boost") partitions on the USB stick, only 3 logical partitions on my RAID 10- with the abilit to "nuke" either small OS partition and still keep my data redundant while increasing acess speed. You dig? I'm kinda proud. Oh, and I cloned the USB stick just in case it ever craps out, all I have to do is swap it out and my main PC still boots w/o a glitch.

    There's my rational. So to accomplish it- get your drives all hooked up- get a live USB stick Suse's is great, gParted will do. (it can be done from the installer- but is more flexible if you do it from a live sytsem- plus the installer still sees all the "physical drives" and it can confuse some people- or hose your install if you do it wrong)

    1) Get all your gear hooked up, the drives and the USB stick.

    2) Boot Suse live from SEPERATE MEDIA Recomend for your seperate media 1- the live distro of Suse, 2- the drivers for your mobo to have windows read it, and the article I link to at the end of this saved on the SEPERATE MEDIA (if you are reading this- you definately have several thumb drives laying around. Use 'em)

    3) install dm-raid- then it will be able to see your disks as a RAID

    4) Format/create the partitions you need. (I outlined what works for me above-tweak it how you like)


    a) EXT3 is most compatible, for BOOT, on USB stick (remember mine is 4 GB) ~200MB
    b) \swap on USB stick (cut the remaining space in half ~1.75 GB- PLENTY of space for SWAP)
    c) The rest of the space for "Ready Boost" (it does speed up win7)- but do not have it mount at boot.
    d) whatever you like for linux \ I do 20 GB and that's way overkill.
    e) Let win7's installer format the partition, but define it in this step. Feel free to tag it NTSF, but Win7's installer is flaky on RAIDs, in my experience. Re-format it if Win7 installer gives you grief. Make your windows over 100 GB. XP takes 16 at install, I THINK win7 takes about 25 GB (its been awhile sinc I did this)- but how much you want to install depends on alot of things- of course. How many programs you want, how much space you have total, all that. I made mine 125GB and have a selection of programs, room for 3-4 recent games, and still have space. Just so you know though- OS's and especcially windows like to run with less than 80% of its partition full.
    The 80% rule is familiar to any engineer, quality technician, and many layman- never design a system that needs to run at 100% to do its job. Make it beefy enough to run at 80% and you usually find its sweet spot of opperation.
    f) then format the large partition \home (windows will use it for it's user info jointly)- do that one NTFS. Format it and remember to set it to mount at boot. Don't worry, modern linux kernals have those back in the day configuration issues of not being able to read/write ironed out- thank you Linux guru's. Just use up the rest of your space after making the two partitions for your two OS's (sometimes I have made machines with multiple OS's if I need to run multiple OS's for all my nerdy reasons- but then you have to shrink the size of this partition)

    At the end of this step, if you followed my method- you should have three partitions on your RAID and three on your USB stick- two on the stick if you don't want a "Ready Boost" drive.

    5) Install GRUB on the small partition on the USB stick- remember that's what this thread is about- getting fake RAID to work with a multi-boot system.

    6) Install Suse (or your Linux flavor of the month) onto its RAID partition- you shouldn't need alot of space. Like I wrote- I do 20 GB and that's way overkill.

    7) Reboot, flex your Linux system, make sure its running right. THEN reboot, and install windows on its RAID partition. (It should be the smaller of the two NTFS patitions you made in step 4- Follow me for another minute- 4 500GB drives in raid 10= 1 TB (1,000 GB). 20 for Linux \ 125 for Win7 = 2 NTFS drives, one is 125 GB, and one is ~ 860GB- that last one is for all your "stuff" pictures, music, you're attrocious self-reflective new-age poetry, and exotic waffle recipies- now available to either OS! Joy of Joys!

    8) That last step is the trickiest- once Windows is happy- read this article, its thourough and not as hard as what I just wrote will be to accomplish.
    How to move user data folder to non-system partition in windows 7/vista

    9) hmmm... well that might seem like alot of work, and time- but you don't want to know how much time I spent rebuilding my dual boot system after a virus hit windows. This way your personal data is reasonably safe. So step 9? Enjoy whatever you are getting up to dual booting.
    Oh- clone the USB stick that has your bootloader on it. Just in case that fails. Isn't that why you have a RAID in the first place?
    Last edited by Pacidermiz_X; 05-Feb-2013 at 16:25. Reason: forgot the last step

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