Page 5 of 12 FirstFirst ... 34567 ... LastLast
Results 41 to 50 of 111

Thread: 12.1 64 bit won't boot

  1. #41

    Default Re: 12.1 64 bit won't boot

    I am having a similar problem, and getting very frustrated:

    I have been using Linux on my graduate school's network for the past six months. Just last weekend installed OpenSUSE 12.1 64 bit after partitioning my previously solely Windows 7 64-bit machine. The issue that I am experiencing is that after I install suse and everything is working well (Internet working, installing my software through repos, etc.), I went to restart my system. After rebooting Windows 7 boots. I checked in the advanced system settings and the only operating systems that Windows recognizes is Windows 7. I then try to restart my computer and prompt for the computer to let me choose what I would like to boot (this is the system boot menu, so my options are my hard drive and my DVD drive, among other system hardware). So, I try to look through the BIOS for anything. Nothing jumps out.

    I can load the live CD and go into the system recovery measures but I don't want to do this if I don't need to (this happened to me before but I just reinstalled the suse and thought I was okay. Now, however, it seems that this is a reoccuring issue.

    I am running:
    W7 Home Premium SP1 (64 bit)
    Acer Aspire M3410
    AMD Phenom II X4 840T Processor 2.90 GHz
    4.00 GB Ram

    Can someone please help me! I am not Linux-savvy enough to use the system recovery options.

  2. #42

    Default Re: 12.1 64 bit won't boot

    I ran the extended version over my entire hard disc and everything checked out . Maybe I'm just doomed to Windows forever. Oh well, i tried...

  3. #43
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Austin - Texas
    Posts
    10,140
    Blog Entries
    48

    Smile Re: 12.1 64 bit won't boot

    Quote Originally Posted by mylesbaker View Post
    I am having a similar problem, and getting very frustrated:

    I have been using Linux on my graduate school's network for the past six months. Just last weekend installed OpenSUSE 12.1 64 bit after partitioning my previously solely Windows 7 64-bit machine. The issue that I am experiencing is that after I install suse and everything is working well (Internet working, installing my software through repos, etc.), I went to restart my system. After rebooting Windows 7 boots. I checked in the advanced system settings and the only operating systems that Windows recognizes is Windows 7. I then try to restart my computer and prompt for the computer to let me choose what I would like to boot (this is the system boot menu, so my options are my hard drive and my DVD drive, among other system hardware). So, I try to look through the BIOS for anything. Nothing jumps out.

    I can load the live CD and go into the system recovery measures but I don't want to do this if I don't need to (this happened to me before but I just reinstalled the suse and thought I was okay. Now, however, it seems that this is a reoccuring issue.

    I am running:
    W7 Home Premium SP1 (64 bit)
    Acer Aspire M3410
    AMD Phenom II X4 840T Processor 2.90 GHz
    4.00 GB Ram

    Can someone please help me! I am not Linux-savvy enough to use the system recovery options.
    So, we have no idea about your hard disk setup or how it might be working fine and then stop booting at all. You might want to download a openSUSE KDE LiveCD, boot from the cd and then run the fdisk command from terminal (like kconsole) to tell us more:

    Code:
    su -
    password:
    fdisk -l
    Copy the info from terminal, paste it into a message here using the advance message editor, selecting just the pasted text and pressing the # code button, so it in a code block, like the commands I requested you run above. Here is some info on partitioning you look at:

    Each hard drive can have up to four PRIMARY partitions, any of which could be marked active and bootable. No matter what you might hear, only one of the first four primary partitions can be booted from. That means you can boot from Primary partitions 1, 2, 3 or 4 and that is all. In order to boot openSUSE, you must load openSUSE and the grub boot loader into one of the first four partitions. Or, your second choice is to load the grub boot loader into the MBR (Master Boot Record) at the start of the disk. The MBR can be blank, like a new disk, it can contain a Windows partition booting code or generic booting code to boot the active partition 1, 2, 3, or 4. Or, as stated before, it can contain the grub boot loader. Why load grub into the MBR then? You do this so that you can "boot" openSUSE from a logical partition, numbered 5 or higher, which is not normally possible. In order to have more than four partitions, one of them (and only one can be assigned as extended) must be a extended partition. It is called an Extended Primary Partition, a container partition, it can be any one of the first four and it can contain one or more logical partitions within. Anytime you see partition numbers 5, 6 or higher for instance, they can only occur inside of the one and only Extended Primary partition you could have.

    What does openSUSE want as far as partitions? It needs at minimum a SWAP partition and a "/" partition where all of your software is loaded. Further, it is recommended you create a separate /home partition, which makes it easier to upgrade or reload openSUSE without losing all of your settings. So, that is three more partitions you must add to what you have now. What must you do to load and boot openSUSE from an external hard drive? Number one, you must be able to select your external hard drive as the boot drive in your BIOS setup. Number two, you need to make sure that the external hard drive, perhaps /dev/sdb, is listed as the first hard drive in your grub device.map file and listed as drive hd0. I always suggest that you do not load grub into the MBR, but rather into the openSUSE "/" root primary partition which means a primary number of 1, 2, 3 or 4. If number one is used, then that will be out. You will mark the openSUSE partition as active for booting and finally you must load generic booting code into the MBR so that it will boot the openSUSE partition. I suggest a partition like this:

    0. /dev/sda, Load MBR with generic booting code
    1. /dev/sda1, Primary, booting NTFS Partition for Windows (small < 500 mb)
    2. /dev/sda2, Primary, NTFS Partition for Windows (Main / Large Partition)
    3. /dev/sda3, Primary EXT4 "/" openSUSE Partition Marked Active for booting (80-120 GB)
    4. /dev/sda4, Primary Extended Partition (Rest of Disk)
    5. /dev/sda5, Logical SWAP partition(4 GB, inside Extended)
    6. /dev/sda6, Logical EXT4 "/home" Your main home directory (Rest of the Extended partition)

    Thank You,
    My Blog: https://forums.opensuse.org/blogs/jdmcdaniel3/

    Software efficiency halves every 18 months, thus compensating for Moore's Law

    Its James again from Austin, Texas

  4. #44

    Default Re: 12.1 64 bit won't boot

    Quote Originally Posted by Camalus28 View Post
    I ran the extended version over my entire hard disc and everything checked out . Maybe I'm just doomed to Windows forever. Oh well, i tried...
    OK, this below is your hard disk, right?

    Quote Originally Posted by Camalus28 View Post
    "fdisk | grep -i linux" didn't work, ran "fdisk -l" instead
    Code:
    Disk /dev/sda: 1000.2 GB, 1000204886016 bytes
    255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 121601 cylinders, total 1953525168 sectors
    Units = sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
    Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
    I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
    Disk identifier: 0x0002e850
    
       Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System
    /dev/sda1            2048      206847      102400    7  HPFS/NTFS/exFAT
    /dev/sda2          206848  1703519345   851656249    7  HPFS/NTFS/exFAT
    /dev/sda3   *  1703520256  1953523711   125001728    f  W95 Ext'd (LBA)
    /dev/sda5      1703522304  1707741183     2109440   82  Linux swap / Solaris
    /dev/sda6      1707743232  1749688319    20972544   83  Linux
    /dev/sda7      1749690368  1953503231   101906432   83  Linux
    You have Grub installed in the boot sector of the extended partition. This partition has the bootflag. I assume you didn't install Grub in MBR. So when you boot, you should see the Grub menu. What happens then?

  5. #45

    Default Re: 12.1 64 bit won't boot

    Quote Originally Posted by jdmcdaniel3 View Post
    So, we have no idea about your hard disk setup or how it might be working fine and then stop booting at all. You might want to download a openSUSE KDE LiveCD, boot from the cd and then run the fdisk command from terminal (like kconsole) to tell us more:

    Code:
    su -
    password:
    fdisk -l
    Copy the info from terminal, paste it into a message here using the advance message editor, selecting just the pasted text and pressing the # code button, so it in a code block, like the commands I requested you run above. Here is some info on partitioning you look at:

    Each hard drive can have up to four PRIMARY partitions, any of which could be marked active and bootable. No matter what you might hear, only one of the first four primary partitions can be booted from. That means you can boot from Primary partitions 1, 2, 3 or 4 and that is all. In order to boot openSUSE, you must load openSUSE and the grub boot loader into one of the first four partitions. Or, your second choice is to load the grub boot loader into the MBR (Master Boot Record) at the start of the disk. The MBR can be blank, like a new disk, it can contain a Windows partition booting code or generic booting code to boot the active partition 1, 2, 3, or 4. Or, as stated before, it can contain the grub boot loader. Why load grub into the MBR then? You do this so that you can "boot" openSUSE from a logical partition, numbered 5 or higher, which is not normally possible. In order to have more than four partitions, one of them (and only one can be assigned as extended) must be a extended partition. It is called an Extended Primary Partition, a container partition, it can be any one of the first four and it can contain one or more logical partitions within. Anytime you see partition numbers 5, 6 or higher for instance, they can only occur inside of the one and only Extended Primary partition you could have.

    What does openSUSE want as far as partitions? It needs at minimum a SWAP partition and a "/" partition where all of your software is loaded. Further, it is recommended you create a separate /home partition, which makes it easier to upgrade or reload openSUSE without losing all of your settings. So, that is three more partitions you must add to what you have now. What must you do to load and boot openSUSE from an external hard drive? Number one, you must be able to select your external hard drive as the boot drive in your BIOS setup. Number two, you need to make sure that the external hard drive, perhaps /dev/sdb, is listed as the first hard drive in your grub device.map file and listed as drive hd0. I always suggest that you do not load grub into the MBR, but rather into the openSUSE "/" root primary partition which means a primary number of 1, 2, 3 or 4. If number one is used, then that will be out. You will mark the openSUSE partition as active for booting and finally you must load generic booting code into the MBR so that it will boot the openSUSE partition. I suggest a partition like this:

    0. /dev/sda, Load MBR with generic booting code
    1. /dev/sda1, Primary, booting NTFS Partition for Windows (small < 500 mb)
    2. /dev/sda2, Primary, NTFS Partition for Windows (Main / Large Partition)
    3. /dev/sda3, Primary EXT4 "/" openSUSE Partition Marked Active for booting (80-120 GB)
    4. /dev/sda4, Primary Extended Partition (Rest of Disk)
    5. /dev/sda5, Logical SWAP partition(4 GB, inside Extended)
    6. /dev/sda6, Logical EXT4 "/home" Your main home directory (Rest of the Extended partition)

    Thank You,
    Wow, thank you so much for the very detailed and well constructed response.

    1. I was under the assumption that my SUSE installation DVD was the "KDE Live CD." I will burn that after I finish this message and try your suggestions.

    2. After your mentioning the partitioning scheme, I can tell you right now that my harddrive was partitioned into 3 sections for my Windows OS. My SUSE partitions fell into 4-7 with my home directory in sda7. Your suggestion sounds spot on.

    What I am going to do is to download and burn a KDE Live CD (I am running the KDE Desktop, not GNOME), run the initial commands you suggested, and report back here after doing so. Assuming that everything is correct as anticipated up until that point, I will definitely need help setting up the master boot record, but I am very pleased to feel like I am headed in the right direction.

    Thanks,
    Myles

  6. #46

    Default Re: 12.1 64 bit won't boot

    I don't know what MBR means... sorry. But I boot, the grub is there, no matter which I choose (other than windows 7) it goes to the default OpenSUSE splash screen, but it's smaller than my screen is. Then, I hear my computer get a little louder, I get a click in my headphones and then it just sits and sits. I'm curious as to why it booted fine the one time, though...

  7. #47

    Default Re: 12.1 64 bit won't boot

    Quote Originally Posted by Camalus28 View Post
    I don't know what MBR means... sorry.
    It's the first sector of the hard disk ... but forget it!

    Quote Originally Posted by Camalus28 View Post
    But I boot, the grub is there, no matter which I choose (other than windows 7) it goes to the default OpenSUSE splash screen, but it's smaller than my screen is.
    That's not a problem ... so far.

    Quote Originally Posted by Camalus28 View Post
    Then, I hear my computer get a little louder, I get a click in my headphones and then it just sits and sits. I'm curious as to why it booted fine the one time, though...
    Before booting, try to append "3" (preceeded by a space) in the Options line at the bottom. Do you get a text mode login prompt?

  8. #48

    Default Re: 12.1 64 bit won't boot

    @mylesbaker

    We have two problems in the same thread. It's not good. If you have other questions, could you please open a new thread?

  9. #49

    Default Re: 12.1 64 bit won't boot

    Quote Originally Posted by jdmcdaniel3 View Post
    So, we have no idea about your hard disk setup or how it might be working fine and then stop booting at all. You might want to download a openSUSE KDE LiveCD, boot from the cd and then run the fdisk command from terminal (like kconsole) to tell us more:

    Code:
    su -
    password:
    fdisk -l
    Copy the info from terminal, paste it into a message here using the advance message editor, selecting just the pasted text and pressing the # code button, so it in a code block, like the commands I requested you run above. Here is some info on partitioning you look at:
    [CODE]
    linux:~ # fdisk -l

    Disk /dev/sda: 1000.2 GB, 1000204886016 bytes
    255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 121601 cylinders, total 1953525168 sectors
    Units = sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
    Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
    I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
    Disk identifier: 0x1f840baa

    Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
    /dev/sda1 2048 33556479 16777216 27 Hidden NTFS WinRE
    /dev/sda2 * 33556480 33761279 102400 7 HPFS/NTFS/exFAT
    /dev/sda3 33761280 784494793 375366757 7 HPFS/NTFS/exFAT
    /dev/sda4 784496640 1953392639 584448000 f W95 Ext'd (LBA)
    /dev/sda5 784498688 784807935 154624 83 Linux
    /dev/sda6 784809984 789016575 2103296 82 Linux swap / Solaris
    /dev/sda7 789018624 830961663 20971520 83 Linux
    /dev/sda8 830963712 1953376255 561206272 83 Linux
    [\CODE]

    Each hard drive can have up to four PRIMARY partitions, any of which could be marked active and bootable. No matter what you might hear, only one of the first four primary partitions can be booted from. That means you can boot from Primary partitions 1, 2, 3 or 4 and that is all. In order to boot openSUSE, you must load openSUSE and the grub boot loader into one of the first four partitions. Or, your second choice is to load the grub boot loader into the MBR (Master Boot Record) at the start of the disk. The MBR can be blank, like a new disk, it can contain a Windows partition booting code or generic booting code to boot the active partition 1, 2, 3, or 4. Or, as stated before, it can contain the grub boot loader. Why load grub into the MBR then? You do this so that you can "boot" openSUSE from a logical partition, numbered 5 or higher, which is not normally possible. In order to have more than four partitions, one of them (and only one can be assigned as extended) must be a extended partition. It is called an Extended Primary Partition, a container partition, it can be any one of the first four and it can contain one or more logical partitions within. Anytime you see partition numbers 5, 6 or higher for instance, they can only occur inside of the one and only Extended Primary partition you could have.

    What does openSUSE want as far as partitions? It needs at minimum a SWAP partition and a "/" partition where all of your software is loaded. Further, it is recommended you create a separate /home partition, which makes it easier to upgrade or reload openSUSE without losing all of your settings. So, that is three more partitions you must add to what you have now. What must you do to load and boot openSUSE from an external hard drive? Number one, you must be able to select your external hard drive as the boot drive in your BIOS setup. Number two, you need to make sure that the external hard drive, perhaps /dev/sdb, is listed as the first hard drive in your grub device.map file and listed as drive hd0. I always suggest that you do not load grub into the MBR, but rather into the openSUSE "/" root primary partition which means a primary number of 1, 2, 3 or 4. If number one is used, then that will be out. You will mark the openSUSE partition as active for booting and finally you must load generic booting code into the MBR so that it will boot the openSUSE partition. I suggest a partition like this:

    0. /dev/sda, Load MBR with generic booting code
    1. /dev/sda1, Primary, booting NTFS Partition for Windows (small < 500 mb)
    2. /dev/sda2, Primary, NTFS Partition for Windows (Main / Large Partition)
    3. /dev/sda3, Primary EXT4 "/" openSUSE Partition Marked Active for booting (80-120 GB)
    4. /dev/sda4, Primary Extended Partition (Rest of Disk)
    5. /dev/sda5, Logical SWAP partition(4 GB, inside Extended)
    6. /dev/sda6, Logical EXT4 "/home" Your main home directory (Rest of the Extended partition)

    Thank You,
    Alright, so, based on your suggestion and comparing my layout, it looks likes I have an extended partition in partition 4, so I need to get grub loaded into it with the MBR. You willing to help me with that? I am going to start a new thread, and I hope to see you there! I will post a link to it once I create it.

    Thanks again.

  10. #50
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Austin - Texas
    Posts
    10,140
    Blog Entries
    48

    Default Re: 12.1 64 bit won't boot

    Alright, so, based on your suggestion and comparing my layout, it looks likes I have an extended partition in partition 4, so I need to get grub loaded into it with the MBR. You willing to help me with that? I am going to start a new thread, and I hope to see you there! I will post a link to it once I create it.

    Thanks again.
    That is a good idea to start your own thread and re-post the fdisk info as well. Its getting late in Austin and I may not be online till Wednesday again. Good Luck.

    Thank You,
    My Blog: https://forums.opensuse.org/blogs/jdmcdaniel3/

    Software efficiency halves every 18 months, thus compensating for Moore's Law

    Its James again from Austin, Texas

Page 5 of 12 FirstFirst ... 34567 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •