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Thread: Filesystem that can be used by Linux and Windows

  1. #1
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    Default Filesystem that can be used by Linux and Windows

    I wonder if there is a solution (an easy one) that i can apply to my
    computer.
    On my harddrive i have two partition that contain images and movies and
    i like to access them from Linux and Windows alike.
    Right now they are formatted to NTSF since Linux can read that. But
    Windows is more dumb from what i understand and can not read any other
    filesystem.
    Is there perhaps a driver one can use or to ask differently, which
    filesystem should i use to access the data from both OS.
    At one point i will have a dedicated Linux box, right now everything is
    one computer.
    I did read that there is a EXT driver for Windows, but it is very basic
    and ignores all privileges.
    I am also happy if someone points me to a FAQ or a guide that i can
    read.

    ---
    Euer Komputerfriek Joerg
    using KDE on 11.4 x64 and happy with a cup of real hot coffee....
    Need help? Call 207.252.3.96 (really)


  2. #2
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    Default Re: Filesystem that can be used by Linux and Windows

    Didn't you just answer the question yourself? (NTFS)

    Even better, just use the one OS that can do it all
    Leap 15.1_KDE
    My Articles Was I any help? If yes: Click the star below

  3. #3
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    Smile Re: Filesystem that can be used by Linux and Windows

    I wonder if there is a solution (an easy one) that i can apply to my
    computer.
    On my harddrive i have two partition that contain images and movies and
    i like to access them from Linux and Windows alike.
    Right now they are formatted to NTSF since Linux can read that. But
    Windows is more dumb from what i understand and can not read any other
    filesystem.
    Is there perhaps a driver one can use or to ask differently, which
    filesystem should i use to access the data from both OS.
    At one point i will have a dedicated Linux box, right now everything is
    one computer.
    I did read that there is a EXT driver for Windows, but it is very basic
    and ignores all privileges.
    I am also happy if someone points me to a FAQ or a guide that i can
    read.
    It is my suggestion and opinion that you abandon any attempt to get Windows to read EXTx partitions. There is nothing wrong with using NTFS partitions for media files that can be shared between Windows and openSUSE. I normally modify the options in my fstab file to say only defaults for partition mounts which allows all in Linux to write to the NTFS partitions. If I want to share something, I put in the NTFS partition. Only Windows can create this partition and it is only useful if you dual boot between Windows and openSUSE. In many cases where attempts were made to allow Windows to write to EXTx partitions, the partition becomes corrupted. Since it is not native, an external driver must be used. Many of these drivers are not current with the latest Linux partitions like EXT4. In the end, there is just no good reason to not use NTFS as an exchange point in dual boot systems and no one OS screws up the other.

    Thank You,
    My Blog: https://forums.opensuse.org/blogs/jdmcdaniel3/

    Software efficiency halves every 18 months, thus compensating for Moore's Law

    Its James again from Austin, Texas

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Filesystem that can be used by Linux and Windows

    On Sun, 30 Oct 2011 21:06:06 GMT
    jdmcdaniel3 <jdmcdaniel3@no-mx.forums.opensuse.org> wrote:

    >
    >> I wonder if there is a solution (an easy one) that i can apply to my
    >> computer.
    >> On my harddrive i have two partition that contain images and movies
    >> and i like to access them from Linux and Windows alike.
    >> Right now they are formatted to NTSF since Linux can read that. But
    >> Windows is more dumb from what i understand and can not read any
    >> other filesystem.
    >> Is there perhaps a driver one can use or to ask differently, which
    >> filesystem should i use to access the data from both OS.
    >> At one point i will have a dedicated Linux box, right now everything
    >> is one computer.
    >> I did read that there is a EXT driver for Windows, but it is very
    >> basic and ignores all privileges.
    >> I am also happy if someone points me to a FAQ or a guide that i can
    >> read.

    >
    >It is my suggestion and opinion that you abandon any attempt to get
    >Windows to read EXTx partitions. There is nothing wrong with using
    >NTFS partitions for media files that can be shared between Windows and
    >openSUSE. I normally modify the options in my fstab file to say only
    >*defaults* for partition mounts which allows all in Linux to write to
    >the NTFS partitions. If I want to share something, I put in the NTFS
    >partition. Only Windows can create this partition and it is only
    >useful if you dual boot between Windows and openSUSE. In many cases
    >where attempts were made to allow Windows to write to EXTx partitions,
    >the partition becomes corrupted. Since it is not native, an external
    >driver must be used. Many of these drivers are not current with the
    >latest Linux partitions like EXT4. In the end, there is just no good
    >reason to not use NTFS as an exchange point in dual boot systems and
    >no one OS screws up the other.
    >
    >Thank You,
    >
    >


    Ah, ok. So then it wasn't a to bad decision i made. In my heart i was
    hopping i could use a linux filesystem, but i can live with NTSF.
    On the other hand, it shows me that Linux is truly a wonderful system
    since it can read others filesystem.
    Thanks for confirming it and yes, i will not attempt to do otherwise.

    ---
    Euer Komputerfriek Joerg
    using KDE on 11.4 x64 and happy with a cup of real hot coffee....
    Need help? Call 207.252.3.96 (really)

  5. #5
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    Smile Re: Filesystem that can be used by Linux and Windows

    Thanks for confirming it and yes, i will not attempt to do otherwise.
    You are very welcome JoergJaeger and it is OK to ask about any such question like this.

    Thank You,
    My Blog: https://forums.opensuse.org/blogs/jdmcdaniel3/

    Software efficiency halves every 18 months, thus compensating for Moore's Law

    Its James again from Austin, Texas

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Filesystem that can be used by Linux and Windows

    I will just share my experience.
    1. I have a common data partition which is formatted with NTFS. My movies, songs, ebooks, etc are stored there.
    2. But since I mainly use openSUSE for everything, there is a little fear that there can be some issue if I continue writing to the NTFS partition. (It has happened once, when there was some corruption in some of the files which I had written to the NTFS partition from linux, in the past).
    3. Now I use the Diskinternals Linux reader for windows (freeware), and can simple read my data from the ext partitions, and copy them over to the ntfs. so far so good.

    check it out, and see if it works for you as well.

    - reo

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Filesystem that can be used by Linux and Windows

    Probably the most obvious should be FAT and FAT32, but common to all filesystem choices are tradeoffs in security and features.

    So, for example although both some versions of Linux and Windows can even install on FAT/FAT32 and all can read/write on those filesystems without special drivers, as the lowest common denominator there is least possible security and sometimes performance.

    HTH,
    Tony

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