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Thread: Graphing calculator?

  1. #1
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    Default Graphing calculator?

    I was looking at my old Ti-84 today and thought surely there was a linux program that did the same things but harnessed the power of a PC and display of an actual monitor. I took at a peek on yast and didn't see anything. Then did some googling, didn't see anything obvious. This exists right?

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Graphing calculator?

    Googling 'graphics calc app linux' (and similar) yielded a number of results for me, however, a some of apps such as GraphCalcwere created around 2000-2003 and did not appear to be in current development (although perhaps that may not matter much to you). Anyway, here's one such link listing several calculator apps:

    7 of the Best Free Linux Calculators - Linux Links - The Linux Portal Site

    Qalculate might do what you need, and is available from the openSUSE standard repo. Install it with:

    Code:
    zypper in qalculate
    Genious Mathematical Tool is another powerful calculator program that can do graphing (plotting).

    I've barely touched the surface, but will leave you to research a little harder

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Graphing calculator?

    Genius looks more powerful than my calculator and the fact it is still being in development is quite neat. It's probably more than enough for my needs.

    On a similar note, does anyone know what is used for high performance number crunching? I'm curious if there is a single go to program or if everything is custom coded.

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    Default Re: Graphing calculator?

    On a similar note, does anyone know what is used for high performance number crunching? I'm curious if there is a single go to program or if everything is custom coded.
    It depends on the research or task at hand. There are numerous specialised statistics and analytical tools available, both free and commercial. Spreadsheets can be suitable in some circumstances, because they allow for easy manipulation of data and relatively simple to use.

    Mathematica is a will known powerful commercial application that will blow your mind. There are home and student editions available at reasonable prices.

    Another comprehensive mathematics application is MATLAB.Its often used in research environments for crunching for real-world data, and generating graphs etc.

    For solving agalgebraic equations, mathomatic is worth considering too. It's also available for openSUSE:

    software.opensuse.org: Search Results

  5. #5

    Default Re: Graphing calculator?

    Quote Originally Posted by cheese_whiz0 View Post
    On a similar note, does anyone know what is used for high performance number crunching?
    Given that I'm never sure that I understand anything, I have to note that you could be looking for two different kinds of answer
    1. A computing cluster
    2. A specialised number-crunching program


    assuming that you mean 2), you probably mean something like Octave, JMathlib, and more.

    Note that there are other options too, if you look in Yast > Install and remove software> search > math but many of the open source options are mathematica/mathCAD work-alikes, and are probably much easier to learn to use if you already have experience with one of those.

  6. #6
    mcjam NNTP User

    Default Re: Graphing calculator?

    cheese whiz0 wrote:

    >
    > I was looking at my old Ti-84 today and thought surely there was a linux
    > program that did the same things but harnessed the power of a PC and
    > display of an actual monitor. I took at a peek on yast and didn't see
    > anything. Then did some googling, didn't see anything obvious. This
    > exists right?
    >
    >


    If you are running Linux, you should definitely check out gnuplot and
    maxima. gnuplot for graphing and analysis, maxima for math.

    Both are console applications and may seem dated and unfriendly at first
    (though there are GUI frontends available). But if you spend a little effort
    to learn them you will find them to be powerful tools, IMO.

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Graphing calculator?

    Quote Originally Posted by markone View Post
    Given that I'm never sure that I understand anything, I have to note that you could be looking for two different kinds of answer
    1. A computing cluster
    2. A specialised number-crunching program
    I meant a bit of both but mostly the latter. I'm guessing high performance number crunching programs are all parallel processes that run well on computing clusters; probably beowulf clusters?

    As for gnuplot and maxima, I'll give them a try some time.

    On another slightly related note, how do I take a peek at the underlying code in things I download? I'm a novice at coding and haven't had experience with compiled languages but am curious how things typically look like. As for beowulf clusters, does AMD offer better price/performance than Intel in this type of thing? I'm also seeing a much higher premium on server mobos and cpus and I'm not seeing how it is justified.

    One more tangent and I'll be completely off topic and asking about ham sandwiches.

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Graphing calculator?

    does anyone know what is used for high performance number crunching?
    1. Assembler and C. Examples: ECPP, GIMPS, Msieve

    2. GNU MP: GMP
    Technology is 'stuff that doesn't work yet.' -- Bran Ferren

  9. #9

    Default Re: Graphing calculator?

    Quote Originally Posted by cheese_whiz0 View Post
    As for beowulf clusters, does AMD offer better price/performance than Intel in this type of thing? I'm also seeing a much higher premium on server mobos and cpus and I'm not seeing how it is justified.
    That's way off topic, but:
    • all of this 'lots of cpus' stuff, however it is achieved, depends on problems that can be attacked without data dependencies holding up one computational thread, dependant on the outputs from other parts of the computation; there are some important special cases (cfd, and similar simulations, for example) where algorithms can be arranged to proceed in a step-by-step, but not computationally deadlocked manner, but, in general, having many completely independent calculations going on does allow you to make optimal use of all the cpus. So many problems are not really suited to this approach, but some are.
    • For 'many cpus' in a data centre, there are 'many considerations'; one that you don't mention is computational throughput (however defined) per watt; given that many data centres are limited, at least without major investment, in the amount of watts that they can cool, this can be difficult.
    • So having done the 'perf per watt' and 'some problems not suitable for the many cpus' details, I think that you can say that it is easier to get more cpu cores per unit currency with AMD and, for a strictly defined subset of all problems, this is useful.
    • OTOH, if you have a need for perf in a non-parallelisable thread, and you are prepared to pay to get it, you are almost certainly better off going Intel and the highest clock speeds that you can afford
    • (and, of course, all of this cpu performance is quasi-irrelevant to a whole class of problems, for which it is more about terrabytes of ram, bandwidth to disk or bandwidth of IO)


    I think that's a long way of saying that there are no easy answers, but ymmv

    For server mobos, it is definitely a lower volume market than 'ordinary' (if that's an appropriate word) consumer mobos, which explains some of the price difference. For server cpus, I'm not sure that there really is so much difference, where similar spec products are available. Quite often, though, the specs are quite different in subtle ways; bigger cache, wider temperature ranges, reduced power consumption, so it is often difficult to compare fairly.


    Quote Originally Posted by cheese_whiz0 View Post
    One more tangent and I'll be completely off topic and asking about ham sandwiches.
    ...and did you know that independent benchmarks show that Chicken, Tomato, Black Olive and Jalapeno is better?

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Graphing calculator?

    deano ferrari wrote:

    >
    >> On a similar note, does anyone know what is used for high performance
    >> number crunching? I'm curious if there is a single go to program or if
    >> everything is custom coded.

    > It depends on the research or task at hand. There are numerous
    > specialised statistics and analytical tools available, both free and
    > commercial. Spreadsheets can be suitable in some circumstances, because
    > they allow for easy manipulation of data and relatively simple to use.
    >
    > 'Mathematica' (http://www.wolfram.com/mathematica/) is a will known
    > powerful commercial application that will blow your mind. There are home
    > and student editions available at reasonable prices.
    >
    > Another comprehensive mathematics application is 'MATLAB.'
    > (http://www.mathworks.com/products/matlab/index.html)Its often used in
    > research environments for crunching for real-world data, and generating
    > graphs etc.
    >
    > For solving agalgebraic equations, 'mathomatic'
    > (http://www.mathomatic.org/math/) is worth considering too. It's also
    > available for openSUSE:
    >
    > 'software.opensuse.org: Search Results' (http://tinyurl.com/5sxzjzj)
    >

    I want to add GNU Octave which I use a lot (combined with the automatically
    tuned linear algebra system ATLAS, I always recompile the source rpm for
    maximum performance, it is also parallelized for SMP machines).

    Scilab is also free and very good for number crunching (but I prefer octave
    myself).

    SciPy (based on NumPy) with MatPlotLib is slightly different but very
    powerfull and covers a wide range of numeric tasks.

    Sometimes I use GNU R for more specialized statistic tasks.

    Beside that I code some math programs in Fortran 2003 sometimes (if it makes
    sense) with openmp parallelization augmented with lapack, gsl (with the F95
    bindings for gsl) and atlas.

    For symbolic calculations maxima with wxmaxima as gui frontend.

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