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Thread: Good application for reviewing and monitoring/overclocking system?

  1. #1
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    Default Good application for reviewing and monitoring/overclocking system?

    Hi can someone recommend an application similar to AMD app in windows, that can be used to monitor and overclock system.

    Thanks

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Good application for reviewing and monitoring/overclocking system?

    On 06/11/2011 06:06 PM, jimt123 wrote:
    >
    > Hi can someone recommend an application similar to AMD app in windows,


    not always a good assumption that a lot of answer folks here have know
    what you mean when you say you want something similar to something in
    windows.....well, i never used the app you referenced...what/how does it
    work? does AMD provide a Linux driver for that app?

    anyway, compared to windows, just running linux IS overclocking
    enough...see how much faster _everything_ works??


    > that can be used to monitor and overclock system.


    use what of these you need:

    top
    atop
    ntop
    htop
    s.m.a.r.t.
    hddtemp
    lm_sensors
    ksensors

    as for _how_ to overclock, that is done in the BIOS, right? so, openSUSE
    is not involved..

    by the way, imo the best way to have more performance is to buy faster
    hardware and run it at manufacturer's recommended setting--it will run
    cooler, last longer, burn less electricity/battery, generate less
    greenhouse gasses and save you money in all those ways..

    ymmv

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  3. #3
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    Default Re: Good application for reviewing and monitoring/overclocking system?

    Thanks for the reply, point taken about not all Linux users being familiar with Windows. Yes overclocking is done from BIOS, but I was looking for a GUI in Linux that can do that and monitor system parameters at the same time giving real time info on cpu/gpu speed, temp, voltages etc etc.

    As for as overclocking goes, as I'm sure you know all hardware is designed with a great amount of safety factor for increased stability purposes, in other words alot of untapped perfomance (free, which is what Linux is all about!). And the fun is to un-lock this free upgrade whilst still maintaining stability.

    Cheers

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Good application for reviewing and monitoring/overclocking system?

    On 06/12/2011 12:36 PM, jimt123 wrote:
    >
    > Yes overclocking is done from BIOS, but I was
    > looking for a GUI in Linux that can do that and monitor system
    > parameters at the same time giving real time info on cpu/gpu speed,
    > temp, voltages etc etc.


    well, there are plenty of GUI monitors available for all sorts of
    things, but for cpu/gpu voltages and Hz settings, etc i know of none..

    and, i unaware of any linux software which is able to change BIOS
    settings...so..

    why not use the BIOS (or Windows it really has the ability to manipulate
    those) for setting the over clock parameters...then boot to Linux and
    use any of the available monitors..


    > As for as overclocking goes, as I'm sure you know all hardware is
    > designed with a great amount of safety factor for increased stability
    > purposes, in other words alot of untapped perfomance (free, which is
    > what Linux is all about!).


    but it is not free! more computing power means more electricity, heat
    and wear/tear...again: *buy* the hardware which gives the required
    performance and run it to spec..



    > And the fun is to un-lock this free upgrade
    > whilst still maintaining stability.


    oh, i see...you want to play the fun Be a Computer Scientist Game..

    in my opinion all games are best played on game systems, like Windows...

    keep the important on industrial strength systems and separate from the
    Redmond Game Desktop Station..

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    * When your gecko is broken you have a reptile dysfunction! *

  5. #5

    Default Re: Good application for reviewing and monitoring/overclocking system?

    Quote Originally Posted by jimt123 View Post
    Thanks for the reply, point taken about not all Linux users being familiar with Windows. Yes overclocking is done from BIOS, but I was looking for a GUI in Linux that can do that and monitor system parameters at the same time giving real time info on cpu/gpu speed, temp, voltages etc etc.
    conky can display all this kind of things and update them as often as you like ... although setting an update time inferior to one second (which is possible) will use huge processor resources.

    I suggest installing conkyconf from my repo. This is a script I wrote to setup a basic (but reasonably good) configuration file for conky. The package includes a lua script which colors processes using more CPU and memory resources in red and gradients filesystem usage from green to red (under openSUSE). conkyconf has several options and is highly configurable. It will try to find the sensors (but might fail) and add them. Anyway, it is just a help to generate the user ~/.conkyrc or the system wide /etc/conky/conky.conf, which are a little complex. Once you have this file, you can read conky documentation here: Conky - Documentation and modify your ~/.conkyrc as you like to add other sensors.

    conkyconf will install conky and conkyweather by dependencies.

    Here's how to proceed.

    As root:

    Code:
    su -l
    zypper ar http://download.opensuse.org/repositories/home:/please_try_again/openSUSE_11.4/  PTA
    zypper refresh -r PTA
    zypper in conkyconf
    conkyconf -s
    As user, to create a basic ~/.conkyrc:
    Code:
    conkyconf
    If you're using kde or gnome with compositing, you should add the option -k and call conky with the option -c $HOME/.conkyrc.kde ... or use this wrapper:

    Code:
    #! /bin/bash
    
    sysconf=/etc/conky/conky.conf.kde
    userconf=$HOME/.conkyrc.kde
    
    for conf in $sysconf $userconf ; do
            [ -f $conf ] && cfg="-c $conf"
    done
    
    ps -C plasma-desktop && { 
    [ "$(kreadconfig --file kwinrc --group Compositing --key Enabled)" == "false" ] && exit
    config=$cfg
    }
    #ps -C xfce4-panel && config=$cfg
    #ps -C gnome-panel && config=$cfg
    
    ps nc -C conky >/dev/null || conky $config
    This post (which is not about conky at all) includes screenshots which show conky running on the KDE desktop: Thèmes et couleurs d'OpenOffice/LIbreOffice.

    I know I should write a more detailed post about conkyconf but I haven't done that yet.

    To see the different options, type:

    Code:
    conkyconf -h
    You can change the update interval any time and as often as you like with the option -i. It might be very funny under circumstances. If you want to stress your CPU, try:

    Code:
    conkyconf -i 0.1


    Have fun!

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Good application for reviewing and monitoring/overclocking system?

    Quote Originally Posted by jimt123 View Post
    Thanks for the reply, point taken about not all Linux users being familiar with Windows. Yes overclocking is done from BIOS, but I was looking for a GUI in Linux that can do that and monitor system parameters at the same time giving real time info on cpu/gpu speed, temp, voltages etc etc.
    A GUI overclocking utility for Linux would have to be provided by your motherboard manufacturer. Ask them. As to hardware monitoring, simple CPU temp and some GPU temp monitors are available as KDE plasmoids (probably also for Gnome), have a look at kde-apps.org. For more involved stuff, have a look at conky.
    Günter

    Desk: Leap 42.2, KDE 5, Intel i3, 8Gb, Kingston 64Gb SSD, 2 SATA.
    Lap: Thinkpad T430, Tumbleweed, Intel i5, 8Gb, SSD.

  7. #7

    Default Re: Good application for reviewing and monitoring/overclocking system?

    Quote Originally Posted by jimt123 View Post
    Thanks for the reply, point taken about not all Linux users being familiar with Windows
    If we weren't or hadn't been familiar with Windows, we would probably still use it.

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Good application for reviewing and monitoring/overclocking system?

    On 06/12/2011 02:06 PM, please try again wrote:
    >
    > If we weren't or hadn't been familiar with Windows, we would probably
    > still use it.


    well! i'm most familiar with Windows 3.11, because that is the last one
    i used much..

    --
    dd CAVEAT: http://is.gd/bpoMD
    via NNTP openSUSE 11.4 [2.6.37.6-0.5] + KDE 4.6.0 + Thunderbird 3.1.10
    Acer Aspire One D255, 1.66 GHz Atom, 1 GB RAM, Intel Pineview graphics
    * When your gecko is broken you have a reptile dysfunction! *

  9. #9

    Default Re: Good application for reviewing and monitoring/overclocking system?

    Quote Originally Posted by DenverD View Post
    On 06/12/2011 02:06 PM, please try again wrote:
    >
    > If we weren't or hadn't been familiar with Windows, we would probably
    > still use it.


    well! i'm most familiar with Windows 3.11, because that is the last one
    i used much..
    It was the best one anyway. ... but not as good as the 3.1 which came as subsystem in OS/2.

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Good application for reviewing and monitoring/overclocking system?

    Thanks for all the feed back.

    > oh, i see...you want to play the fun Be a Computer Scientist Game..

    > in my opinion all games are best played on game systems, like Windows..

    Thankfully you don't just have to play games to have fun.

    Oh and I'll try not to mention the 'w' word again!

    Cheers!

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