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Thread: Win7 on Fakeraid

  1. #1

    Default Win7 on Fakeraid

    Hi,

    I installed OpenSuse few days ago, and since I can't boot windows.
    I have three disks, two on Fake raid 0 SATA, and one on IDE.
    My Linux disk is /dev/sda and is the IDE, my Windows 7 is on the Fake Raid.

    Ubuntu configured correctly grub, I was able to boot Windows but I forget to save the configuration ..

    Yast made me this :

    Citation : device.map
    cat /boot/grub/device.map
    (hd1) /dev/disk/by-id/raid-nvidia_aeejjefb
    (hd0) /dev/disk/by-id/ata-Maxtor_6Y200P0_Y69E5KSE
    Citation : grub.conf
    title Windows
    map (hd1) (hd0)
    map (hd0) (hd1)
    rootnoverify (hd1,0)
    makeactive
    chainloader +1
    Looks fine but it don't works, I have bootmgr missing.
    May be some special option for Win7 is missing ?
    Once more, ubuntu configured it automatically and it worked, so, it is possible.

    One more thing, is it realy impossible with OpenSuse to edit the entry in the menu.lst ?
    With a real grub, I hit e and I can simply edit the options, but with OpenSuse I can't find a way for that. I can off course add some options to the Linux entry but I can't edit all the root lines, map lines ..

  2. #2
    Join Date
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    Smile Re: Win7 on Fakeraid

    Why not give us the output from a fdisk -l command. Open up a terminal session and run this command:

    Code:
    su -
    password:
    fdisk -l
    Let me say that Windows 7 often creates two partitions, one small and one large and you then need to load the small one. Based on the info you posted below, Windows is on the drive: (hd1) /dev/disk/by-id/raid-nvidia_aeejjefb AND you must have your BIOS set to boot from (hd0) /dev/disk/by-id/ata-Maxtor_6Y200P0_Y69E5KSE where openSUSE must be installed.

    Thank You,
    My Blog: https://forums.opensuse.org/blogs/jdmcdaniel3/

    Software efficiency halves every 18 months, thus compensating for Moore's Law

    Its James again from Austin, Texas

  3. #3

    Default Re: Win7 on Fakeraid

    I installed Win7 myself, only one partition.

    fdisk -l
    Disk /dev/sda: 203.9 GB, 203928109056 bytes
    255 têtes, 63 secteurs/piste, 24792 cylindres, total 398297088 secteurs
    Unités = secteurs de 1 * 512 = 512 octets
    Taille de secteur (logique / physique) : 512 octets / 512 octets
    taille d'E/S (minimale / optimale) : 512 octets / 512 octets
    Identifiant de disque : 0x5351b8fb

    Périphérique Amorce Début Fin Blocs Id Système
    /dev/sda1 63 294728489 147364213+ 7 HPFS/NTFS/exFAT
    /dev/sda2 * 294728490 295130114 200812+ 83 Linux
    /dev/sda3 295131136 299227135 2048000 82 Linux swap / Solaris
    /dev/sda4 299227136 398297087 49534976 83 Linux

    Disk /dev/sdb: 150.0 GB, 150039945216 bytes
    255 têtes, 63 secteurs/piste, 18241 cylindres, total 293046768 secteurs
    Unités = secteurs de 1 * 512 = 512 octets
    Taille de secteur (logique / physique) : 512 octets / 512 octets
    taille d'E/S (minimale / optimale) : 512 octets / 512 octets
    Identifiant de disque : 0xbd4eb297

    Périphérique Amorce Début Fin Blocs Id Système
    /dev/sdb1 * 2048 586090495 293044224 7 HPFS/NTFS/exFAT

    Disk /dev/sdc: 150.0 GB, 150039945216 bytes
    255 têtes, 63 secteurs/piste, 18241 cylindres, total 293046768 secteurs
    Unités = secteurs de 1 * 512 = 512 octets
    Taille de secteur (logique / physique) : 512 octets / 512 octets
    taille d'E/S (minimale / optimale) : 512 octets / 512 octets
    Identifiant de disque : 0x00000000

    Le disque /dev/sdc ne contient pas une table de partitions valable

    Disk /dev/mapper/nvidia_aeejjefb: 300.1 GB, 300079775744 bytes
    255 têtes, 63 secteurs/piste, 36482 cylindres, total 586093312 secteurs
    Unités = secteurs de 1 * 512 = 512 octets
    Taille de secteur (logique / physique) : 512 octets / 512 octets
    taille d'E/S (minimale / optimale) : 65536 octets / 131072 octets
    Identifiant de disque : 0xbd4eb297

    Périphérique Amorce Début Fin Blocs Id Système
    /dev/mapper/nvidia_aeejjefb1 * 2048 586090495 293044224 7 HPFS/NTFS/exFAT

    Disk /dev/mapper/nvidia_aeejjefb_part1: 300.1 GB, 300077285376 bytes
    255 têtes, 63 secteurs/piste, 36482 cylindres, total 586088448 secteurs
    Unités = secteurs de 1 * 512 = 512 octets
    Taille de secteur (logique / physique) : 512 octets / 512 octets
    taille d'E/S (minimale / optimale) : 65536 octets / 131072 octets
    Identifiant de disque : 0x4d544f4f

    Cela ne ressemble pas à une table de partition.
    Vous avez probablement sélectionné le mauvais périphérique.

    Périphérique Amorce Début Fin Blocs Id Système
    /dev/mapper/nvidia_aeejjefb_part1p1 ? 218137203 2138359164 960110981 70 DiskSecure Multi-Boot
    La partition 1 ne débute pas sur une frontière de cylindre physique.
    /dev/mapper/nvidia_aeejjefb_part1p2 ? 544370800 2464669663 960149432 74 Inconnu
    La partition 2 ne débute pas sur une frontière de cylindre physique.
    /dev/mapper/nvidia_aeejjefb_part1p3 ? 225600882 769746299 272072709 82 Linux swap / Solaris
    La partition 3 ne débute pas sur une frontière de cylindre physique.
    /dev/mapper/nvidia_aeejjefb_part1p4 ? 2760638474 2760690110 25818+ 61 SpeedStor
    La partition 4 ne débute pas sur une frontière de cylindre physique.

    Les entrées de la table de partitions ne sont pas dans l'ordre du disque
    Sorry, it's in french but here are the things unusual I think :
    Le disque /dev/sdc ne contient pas une table de partitions valable
    Means that /dev/sdc don't have a valid partitions table.

    For the raid part1
    Cela ne ressemble pas à une table de partition.
    Vous avez probablement sélectionné le mauvais périphérique
    Means that it don't look like a valid partition table, probably selected the wrong device.

    La partition x ne débute pas sur une frontière de cylindre physique.
    Means the partition x don't begin on a edge (or simply the start ?) of a physical cylinder.


    And yes, I boot on hd0 (the IDE disk)
    Thanks

  4. #4
    Join Date
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    Smile Re: Win7 on Fakeraid

    So I see two NTFS partitions here.

    Code:
    /dev/sda1              63   294728489   147364213+   7  HPFS/NTFS/exFAT
    Code:
    /dev/sdb1   *        2048   586090495   293044224    7  HPFS/NTFS/exFAT
    The first is on the same disk as openSUSE or hd0 and the second is on hd1 as I see it. Which one is the real Windows Partition? How did you load Windows 7, before or after you installed openSUSE? Normally, when Windows exists on a separate hard drive, you should be able to make it first in BIOS boot order and have it load on its own. If that does not work, then Windows is messed up in some way and will never work when run from the grub menu. There is a nice script that can locate bootable partitions for openSUSE and for Windows. You can download the file here:

    http://unixversal.com/linux/openSUSE/findgrub301.tgz

    You can read about findgrub here:

    Looking for Grub and Windows bootloader in all partitions.

    Here is generic info on disk partitioning you might find helpful:

    Each hard drive can have up to four PRIMARY partitions, any of which could be marked active and bootable. No matter what you might hear, only one of the first four primary partitions can be booted from. That means you can boot from Primary partitions 1, 2, 3 or 4 and that is all. In order to boot openSUSE, you must load openSUSE and the grub boot loader into one of the first four partitions. Or, your second choice is to load the grub boot loader into the MBR (Master Boot Record) at the start of the disk. The MBR can be blank, like a new disk, it can contain a Windows partition booting code or generic booting code to boot the active partition 1, 2, 3, or 4. Or, as stated before, it can contain the grub boot loader. Why load grub into the MBR then? You do this so that you can "boot" openSUSE from a logical partition, numbered 5 or higher, which is not normally possible. In order to have more than four partitions, one of them (and only one can be assigned as extended) must be a extended partition. It is called an Extended Primary Partition, a container partition, it can be any one of the first four and it can contain one or more logical partitions within. Anytime you see partition numbers 5, 6 or higher for instance, they can only occur inside of the one and only Extended Primary partition you could have.

    What does openSUSE want as far as partitions? It needs at minimum a SWAP partition and a "/" partition where all of your software is loaded. Further, it is recommended you create a separate /home partition, which makes it easier to upgrade or reload openSUSE without losing all of your settings. So, that is three more partitions you must add to what you have now. What must you do to load and boot openSUSE from an external hard drive? Number one, you must be able to select your external hard drive as the boot drive in your BIOS setup. Number two, you need to make sure that the external hard drive, perhaps /dev/sdb, is listed as the first hard drive in your grub device.map file and listed as drive hd0. I always suggest that you do not load grub into the MBR, but rather into the openSUSE "/" root primary partition which means a primary number of 1, 2, 3 or 4. If number one is used, then that will be out. You will mark the openSUSE partition as active for booting and finally you must load generic booting code into the MBR so that it will boot the openSUSE partition. I suggest a partition like this:

    Code:
    0. /dev/sda, Load MBR with generic booting code
    1. /dev/sda1, Primary NTFS Partition for Windows
    2. /dev/sda2, Primary SWAP (4 GB)
    3. /dev/sda3, Primary EXT4 "/" openSUSE Partition Marked Active for booting (80-120 GB)
    4. /dev/sda4, Primary EXT4 "/home" Your main home directory (Rest of the disk)
    
    OR
    
    0. /dev/sdb, Load MBR with generic booting code
    1. /dev/sdb1, Primary NTFS Partition for Windows
    2. /dev/sdb2, Primary SWAP (4 GB)
    3. /dev/sdb3, Primary EXT4 "/" openSUSE Partition Marked Active for booting (80-120 GB)
    4. /dev/sdb4, Primary EXT4 "/home" Your main home directory (Rest of the disk)
    Thank You,
    My Blog: https://forums.opensuse.org/blogs/jdmcdaniel3/

    Software efficiency halves every 18 months, thus compensating for Moore's Law

    Its James again from Austin, Texas

  5. #5

    Default Re: Win7 on Fakeraid

    Quote Originally Posted by Ulrar View Post
    Sorry, it's in french but here are the things unusual I think :
    Code:
    LC_ALL=C /sbin/fdisk -l

  6. #6

    Default Re: Win7 on Fakeraid

    Hello James,
    I have no idea how Linux itself handles the Windows Raid0 (on disks sdb and sdc in this example). So I seriously doubt findgrub would be of any help here. Obviously sdb and sdc are one 'entity'. How is Grub supposed to know which HD's bootsector it is supposed to chainload? Does it matter in a 'fakeraid'? Would a different mapping, including the third disk, help? Or are the two SATA disks considered as a single disk in the fakeraid from the BIOS point of view. Well, I see that I ask more questions than I provide answers here.

    And one more question, @Ulrar, what's in this NTFS partition on your IDE disk?

  7. #7

    Default Re: Win7 on Fakeraid

    Thanks for the help.

    The NTFS partition on my IDE disk is just a data partition, no OS on it.

    The thing is, Windows installed it loader on my IDE disk, not in the raid stripe.
    So even if I select the raid stripe in my boot menu, Windows can't boot.
    It is not broken, it always been that way ..
    But you are write, with XP it worked. But I have 7, not XP :/.

    This time in english :
    Disk /dev/sda: 203.9 GB, 203928109056 bytes
    255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 24792 cylinders, total 398297088 sectors
    Units = sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
    Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
    I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
    Disk identifier: 0x5351b8fb

    Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
    /dev/sda1 63 294728489 147364213+ 7 HPFS/NTFS/exFAT
    /dev/sda2 * 294728490 295130114 200812+ 83 Linux
    /dev/sda3 295131136 299227135 2048000 82 Linux swap / Solaris
    /dev/sda4 299227136 398297087 49534976 83 Linux

    Disk /dev/sdb: 150.0 GB, 150039945216 bytes
    255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 18241 cylinders, total 293046768 sectors
    Units = sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
    Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
    I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
    Disk identifier: 0xbd4eb297

    Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
    /dev/sdb1 * 2048 586090495 293044224 7 HPFS/NTFS/exFAT

    Disk /dev/sdc: 150.0 GB, 150039945216 bytes
    255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 18241 cylinders, total 293046768 sectors
    Units = sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
    Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
    I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
    Disk identifier: 0x00000000

    Disk /dev/sdc doesn't contain a valid partition table

    Disk /dev/mapper/nvidia_aeejjefb: 300.1 GB, 300079775744 bytes
    255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 36482 cylinders, total 586093312 sectors
    Units = sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
    Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
    I/O size (minimum/optimal): 65536 bytes / 131072 bytes
    Disk identifier: 0xbd4eb297

    Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
    /dev/mapper/nvidia_aeejjefb1 * 2048 586090495 293044224 7 HPFS/NTFS/exFAT

    Disk /dev/mapper/nvidia_aeejjefb_part1: 300.1 GB, 300077285376 bytes
    255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 36482 cylinders, total 586088448 sectors
    Units = sectors of 1 * 512 = 512 bytes
    Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes
    I/O size (minimum/optimal): 65536 bytes / 131072 bytes
    Disk identifier: 0x4d544f4f

    This doesn't look like a partition table
    Probably you selected the wrong device.

    Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
    /dev/mapper/nvidia_aeejjefb_part1p1 ? 218137203 2138359164 960110981 70 DiskSecure Multi-Boot
    Partition 1 does not start on physical sector boundary.
    /dev/mapper/nvidia_aeejjefb_part1p2 ? 544370800 2464669663 960149432 74 Unknown
    Partition 2 does not start on physical sector boundary.
    /dev/mapper/nvidia_aeejjefb_part1p3 ? 225600882 769746299 272072709 82 Linux swap / Solaris
    Partition 3 does not start on physical sector boundary.
    /dev/mapper/nvidia_aeejjefb_part1p4 ? 2760638474 2760690110 25818+ 61 SpeedStor
    Partition 4 does not start on physical sector boundary.

    Partition table entries are not in disk order
    I don't understand the layout of the _part1, but on my raid I have only one partition NTFS.
    And It is mounted right now on my OpenSuse and working perfectly fine.

    Except if the OpenSuse installer destroyed some file on my raid partition, the Windows installation is fine.

    just to prove it, here is what I did :
    I had gentoo, I used to to burn Ubuntu.
    I installed Ubuntu, overwriting gentoo, and used it conf to boot on Windows (And it worked fine).
    I used windows to burn OpenSuse, and installed it (overwriting ubuntu).
    And then, can't boot Windows.

  8. #8
    Join Date
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    Location
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    Smile Re: Win7 on Fakeraid

    I don't understand the layout of the _part1, but on my raid I have only one partition NTFS.
    And It is mounted right now on my OpenSuse and working perfectly fine.

    Except if the OpenSuse installer destroyed some file on my raid partition, the Windows installation is fine.

    just to prove it, here is what I did :
    I had gentoo, I used to to burn Ubuntu.
    I installed Ubuntu, overwriting gentoo, and used it conf to boot on Windows (And it worked fine).
    I used windows to burn OpenSuse, and installed it (overwriting ubuntu).
    And then, can't boot Windows.
    So in a case where Windows placed its boot loader onto another partition, then you must boot that one instead as so:

    Code:
    title Windows
    rootnoverify (hd0,0)
    chainloader +1
    If the boot loader is no longer there, because you blew it away, you will need to reload Windows 7 or at least attempt to fix the Windows setup first before proceeding any further. Anything else will just be a waste of your time. I have seen Windows 7 place its boot loader on a separate hard drive before, often the one first in hardware order such as /dev/sda1. I hope you did not do away with that partition.

    Thank You,
    My Blog: https://forums.opensuse.org/blogs/jdmcdaniel3/

    Software efficiency halves every 18 months, thus compensating for Moore's Law

    Its James again from Austin, Texas

  9. #9

    Default Re: Win7 on Fakeraid

    Quote Originally Posted by Ulrar View Post
    Thanks for the help.
    The NTFS partition on my IDE disk is just a data partition, no OS on it.
    The thing is, Windows installed it loader on my IDE disk, not in the raid stripe.
    In this case - and your IDE disk is the first BIOS drive - you just need something like that:

    Code:
    title Windows
    rootnoverify (hd0,0)
    chainloader +1
    DON'T use makeactive if you didn't install Grub in MBR! Or you won't be able to boot Linux anymore.

    * and findgrub would have helped indeed. So, James was right again*.

    Actually updategrub might have got it as well.

    ** and faster too.

  10. #10

    Default Re: Win7 on Fakeraid

    @Ulrar,
    Please, next time, use [CODE]...[/CODE] tags for the ouptut of files or commands. It is easier to read.

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