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Thread: Partitions

  1. #1

    Default Partitions

    Using openSUSE 11.4, 64-bit.

    The "df -h" command shows:

    Filesystem Size Used Avail Use% Mounted on
    rootfs 20G 8.7G 11G 47% /
    devtmpfs 3.0G 232K 3.0G 1% /dev
    tmpfs 3.0G 2.8M 3.0G 1% /dev/shm
    /dev/sda2 20G 8.7G 11G 47% /
    /dev/sda3 437G 586M 436G 1% /home

    This means that my HD has two partitions only, correct? Therefore, If I wanted to install another Linux distribution and have a dual-boot system, I could install such distribution in /dev/sda1 and /dev/sda4, right?

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Partitions

    No. Swap partitions and non-Linux partitions don't show up in this mount table. The correct way is

    fdisk -l /dev/sda

    Also you can have logical partitions so you are not limited to 4.

  3. #3

    Default Re: Partitions

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    To maybe add to what ken yap said, it's also very possible that a system
    can have many more partitions that are not mounted by the current OS so
    they won't show up. By default this doesn't happen a ton since the system
    tries to give access to everything, but it's still allowed. Either way,
    fdisk is the best way I know of to find out about hard drive partitions
    easily/quickly from the command line.

    Good luck.





    On 05/16/2011 09:06 PM, ken yap wrote:
    >
    > No. Swap partitions and non-Linux partitions don't show up in this mount
    > table. The correct way is
    >
    > fdisk -l /dev/sda
    >
    > Also you can have logical partitions so you are not limited to 4.
    >
    >

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  4. #4

    Default Re: Partitions

    To maybe add to what @ab said in addition to what @ken_yap said, it's also possible that a system can have many more partitions that are not included in the extended partition but in BSD disklabels, in which case, they would not appear in fdisk -l output but in sfdisk -l or by querying udev with such scripts like the halinfo script (which originally queried the hal daemon but can query udev as well). Ok, just kidding (but true).

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Partitions

    To the OP: read SDB:Basics of partitions, filesystems, mount points - openSUSE.

    And read
    Code:
    man dh
    to see that df -h it only shows the filling grade of mounted file systems.

    And read
    Code:
    man mount
    to see that mount does give a list of mounted file systems.

    And read
    Code:
    man fstab
    to see that fstab -l gives you a list of partitions of the attached disks (mass storage devices).

    And then decide which tool is the best to answer what you want to know from your system.
    Henk van Velden

  6. #6

    Default Re: Partitions

    To add a word about dh, you should actually use dh -hl to display your computer's mounted local filesystems only. Without the option -l, it outputs nfs mounted filesystems as well (in case there are some), which might not be what you want.

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Partitions

    On 2011-05-17 13:36, please try again wrote:
    >
    > To add a word about dh, you should actually use *dh -hl * to display
    > your computer's mounted local filesystems only.


    dh? I don't even have dh. What is it?

    --
    Cheers / Saludos,

    Carlos E. R.
    (from 11.2 x86_64 "Emerald" at Telcontar)

  8. #8

    Default Re: Partitions

    Sorry, not dh!. It is df (got confused by 'man dh' in Henk's post)
    dh is 'debhelper command sequencer'.

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Partitions

    Sorry, it should of course have been
    Code:
    man df
    I sincerely hope not everybody wil follow me in this error. Well at least Carlos sees it.

    In any case, I hope the OP reads the docs and makes up his mind about what information he wants to get. It isn't not very usefull to give him a lot of usefull options when we do not know what he wants.
    Henk van Velden

  10. #10

    Default Re: Partitions

    Quote Originally Posted by hcvv View Post
    Sorry, it should of course have been
    Code:
    man df
    I sincerely hope not everybody wil follow me in this error. Well at least Carlos sees it.

    In any case, I hope the OP reads the docs and makes up his mind about what information he wants to get. It isn't not very usefull to give him a lot of usefull options when we do not know what he wants.
    Thanks everybody for your guidance.

    What I really want to achieve is installing a second Linux distribution on my HD and create a dual-boot system using GRUB. I think what I need to do in order to achieve this goal is to re-size the existing partitions and create new ones (primary, extended, logical, whatever...). I will need to figure out what to create and what to re-size.

    I don't think that the installer for the second distribution (I am thinking of installing Slackware just to see what it is all about) will give me any help in this respect, so I am preparing the ground for a successful install. I have also been trying to find a comprehensive guide on how to install Slackware and create a dual-boot system with openSUSE already installed.

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