Results 1 to 2 of 2

Thread: Will not boot after updating

  1. #1

    Default Will not boot after updating

    Yesterday I ran an "Online update". One package came up with an update available. Quite honestly, I didn't even take note of which package it was. Anyway, I applied the update patch.
    After that my computer wouldn't boot.

    Grub ran normally, and some of the drivers, and such would load, but just about the time when kdm would come up, all I get is a blank screen. Monitor says "No Signal". I have to manually restart.

    One thing that may help troubleshoot this problem: I managed to boot into failsafe mode, log in as root, and then run kdm from the console. That way I can login. However, my computer is very, very slow running failsafe mode.

    Any idea of how I can get it back to normal?

    also, is there any way to check the history of updates?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Austin - Texas
    Posts
    10,140
    Blog Entries
    48

    Smile Re: Will not boot after updating

    Yesterday I ran an "Online update". One package came up with an update available. Quite honestly, I didn't even take note of which package it was. Anyway, I applied the update patch.
    After that my computer wouldn't boot.

    Grub ran normally, and some of the drivers, and such would load, but just about the time when kdm would come up, all I get is a blank screen. Monitor says "No Signal". I have to manually restart.

    One thing that may help troubleshoot this problem: I managed to boot into failsafe mode, log in as root, and then run kdm from the console. That way I can login. However, my computer is very, very slow running failsafe mode.

    Any idea of how I can get it back to normal?

    also, is there any way to check the history of updates?
    So the difference between Failsafe and the standard openSUSE startup are the following kernel load options:
    Code:
    apm=off noresume edd=off powersaved=off nohz=off highres=off processor.max_cstate=1 nomodeset x11failsafe
    When you are at the Grub Menu, ready to select an Operating System to start, you can actually enter a kernel load option and then press the enter key. For instance, one of the popular kernel load options to add is nomodeset, which is part of the Failsafe startup of openSUSE shown above. You could just type nomodeset, then press the enter key on the standard startup of openSUSE and see if that lets you run. If it does, you could edit your grub menu.lst file and add that one option. If it does not help, you can go down the list shown above one at a time till you find what is allowing you to startup.

    Thank You,
    My Blog: https://forums.opensuse.org/blogs/jdmcdaniel3/

    Software efficiency halves every 18 months, thus compensating for Moore's Law

    Its James again from Austin, Texas

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •