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Thread: Difference between "standard" and "11.4" kernel repositories?

  1. #1

    Question Difference between "standard" and "11.4" kernel repositories?

    Hi All!

    Search for kernel shows "standard" repository, but there is repository for 11.4 too. What is the difference between them? Is it OK to update to 38 Kernel from stable-standard or I should better wait when 38th kernel will be moved from HEAD to stable-11.4 repository?

    PS: I know it works, I tested it on VirtualBox installation, but I am perfectionist and I want to go with "recommended" option, not "just works".
    Home: OpenSUSE 12.1, KDE, default "online update" only, AMD Athlon II 245 (dual core, 2.9 GHz), 8GB RAM
    Work: OpenSUSE 12.3, KDE from KDE:/Release:/410, Asus Zenbook, Intel i7 3517U (as 4 cores, 1.9 GHz), 10GB RAM

  2. #2
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    Smile Re: Difference between "standard" and "11.4" kernel repositories?

    Hi All!

    Search for kernel shows "standard" repository, but there is repository for 11.4 too. What is the difference between them? Is it OK to update to 38 Kernel from stable-standard or I should better wait when 38th kernel will be moved from HEAD to stable-11.4 repository?

    PS: I know it works, I tested it on VirtualBox installation, but I am perfectionist and I want to go with "recommended" option, not "just works".
    Kernel 2.6.38.2 is the most recent stable kernel you can download source to from kernel.org. I am using it on my PC with openSUSE 11.4 and it works great! I don't think it materially matters where it came from though I would look for a version based on the most recent one if possible (2.6.38.2). Besides the two methods you mention, you can compile your own from source using the SAKC bash script located here in message #17:

    S.A.K.C. - SUSE Automated Kernel Compiler - Version 2.00

    To compile your own kernels normally you should consider doing the following:

    Open YaST / Software / Software Management - Select the View Button on the top left and pick Patterns. Now, you will see several Patterns listed and you want to select:

    Code:
        Development 
    
    [X] Base Development
    [X] Linux Kernel Development
    [X] C/C++ Development
    Then Press the Accept button on the bottom right and allow these applications to install. Using SAKC does not remove any previous kernels and all would be there to select from in your grub menu.lst file. If you load a proprietary video driver from nVIDIA or AMD, it must be reloaded into any new kernel that you might install. SAKC is just another option that allows any compatible kernel to be installed from kernel.org without waiting for the version you want to move to one of the repositories.

    Thank You,
    My Blog: https://forums.opensuse.org/blogs/jdmcdaniel3/

    Software efficiency halves every 18 months, thus compensating for Moore's Law

    Its James again from Austin, Texas

  3. #3

    Default Re: Difference between "standard" and "11.4" kernel repositories?

    I've wondered what the standard kernel is all about also. I've searched and searched and searched, found no definite answer. I'm just going to take a guess and say it is some kind of vanilla kernel but I have no clue. Not much help I know but I did spend a solid hour searching trying to find an answer.

  4. #4

    Default Re: Difference between "standard" and "11.4" kernel repositories?

    you wouldnt be wrong the standard is vanilla with no open suse patches while the 11.4 is the open suse patched kernel

  5. #5

    Default Re: Difference between "standard" and "11.4" kernel repositories?

    Quote Originally Posted by jdmcdaniel3 View Post
    Kernel 2.6.38.2 is the most recent stable kernel you can download source to from kernel.org. I am using it on my PC with openSUSE 11.4 and it works great! I don't think it materially matters where it came from though I would look for a version based on the most recent one if possible (2.6.38.2). Besides the two methods you mention, you can compile your own from source using the SAKC bash script located here in message #17:
    Thank you for suggestion, but to be honest - I prefer build tool to rebuild from src.rpm package. Also I think it does matter where kernel comes from, otherwise why 11.1, 11.2 and 11.3 has their own repositories? For now only 11.4 is empty.

    I installed 38 kernel from standard, and it's a bit weird. Redrawing of windows, including Opera switching from tab to tab, it feels different. It looks laggy, while I can't say it works slower because it's lightning-fast any way. So yes, I am using it, but I am wondering still what am I using exactly...

    Quote Originally Posted by adrienk View Post
    you wouldnt be wrong the standard is vanilla with no open suse patches while the 11.4 is the open suse patched kernel
    I find it hard to believe, for 2 reasons:
    1) vanilla has it's own repository:
    Index of /repositories/Kernel:/vanilla
    2) nosrc packages are the same size for 11.3 and standard, and vanilla repository has nothing like this.
    Home: OpenSUSE 12.1, KDE, default "online update" only, AMD Athlon II 245 (dual core, 2.9 GHz), 8GB RAM
    Work: OpenSUSE 12.3, KDE from KDE:/Release:/410, Asus Zenbook, Intel i7 3517U (as 4 cores, 1.9 GHz), 10GB RAM

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