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Thread: Installing openSUSE 11.2 on an existing partitioning scheme with encrypted LVM

  1. #1

    Default Installing openSUSE 11.2 on an existing partitioning scheme with encrypted LVM

    Hello

    I have a Ubuntu server with encrypted LVM2 (logical volumes - /, /var,/tmp,/home etc.).

    I need to migrate this to an OpenSUSE 11.2 server (cannot use a later version due to the availability of a binary-only module - that is just the way it is).

    When I fire up the installer, I cannot seem to find an option to mount the encrypted disk (/dev/sda) which has the LVM2 structure.

    I do not want to lose /home (logical LVM2 volume), so a clean blank slate install is not an option.

    Is there a way to do this with opensuse 11.2 ?

    Thanks.

  2. #2
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    Smile Re: Installing openSUSE 11.2 on an existing partitioning scheme with encrypted LVM

    Hello

    I have a Ubuntu server with encrypted LVM2 (logical volumes - /, /var,/tmp,/home etc.).

    I need to migrate this to an OpenSUSE 11.2 server (cannot use a later version due to the availability of a binary-only module - that is just the way it is).

    When I fire up the installer, I cannot seem to find an option to mount the encrypted disk (/dev/sda) which has the LVM2 structure.

    I do not want to lose /home (logical LVM2 volume), so a clean blank slate install is not an option.

    Is there a way to do this with opensuse 11.2 ?

    Thanks.
    Do you have an option to copy (cp) the /home partition while running Ubuntu to an unencrypted partition anywhere else? I am thinking I would connect an external drive and copy the partition. I would make a live CD that boots, then use its partitioner to blow away the Ubuntu setup, create a new partition setup (swap, / & /home) and copy back your /home partition. Then do a new installation of openSUSE 11.2 but do not format /home. If no ones comes up with a better solution, this is how I would do it.

    Thank You,
    My Blog: https://forums.opensuse.org/blogs/jdmcdaniel3/

    Software efficiency halves every 18 months, thus compensating for Moore's Law

    Its James again from Austin, Texas

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Installing openSUSE 11.2 on an existing partitioning scheme with encrypted LVM

    On Tue April 5 2011 10:06 pm, jdmcdaniel3 wrote:

    >
    >> Hello
    >>
    >> I have a Ubuntu server with encrypted LVM2 (logical volumes - /,
    >> /var,/tmp,/home etc.).
    >>
    >> I need to migrate this to an OpenSUSE 11.2 server (cannot use a later
    >> version due to the availability of a binary-only module - that is just
    >> the way it is).
    >>
    >> When I fire up the installer, I cannot seem to find an option to mount
    >> the encrypted disk (/dev/sda) which has the LVM2 structure.
    >>
    >> I do not want to lose /home (logical LVM2 volume), so a clean blank
    >> slate install is not an option.
    >>
    >> Is there a way to do this with opensuse 11.2 ?
    >>
    >> Thanks. Do you have an option to copy (cp) the /home

    partition while running
    > Ubuntu to an unencrypted partition anywhere else? I am thinking I would
    > connect an external drive and copy the partition. I would make a live
    > CD that boots, then use its partitioner to blow away the Ubuntu setup,
    > create a new partition setup (swap, / & /home) and copy back your /home
    > partition. Then do a new installation of openSUSE 11.2 but do not
    > format /home. If no ones comes up with a better solution, this is how I
    > would do it.
    >
    > Thank You,
    >
    >

    gcaveman;

    As you want to preserve your existing /home, I would suggest you also keep a
    copy of Ubuntu's /etc/passwd and maybe /etc/group. You need to make sure
    that the openSuSE users and groups have the same uid and gid as in Ubuntu.
    It is the uid(gid) that is in the file system not the username(groupname).
    The easiest way to know what each user's(group's) Ubuntu uid(gid) was, is to
    look in /etc/passwd(group).

    This may not be necessary, but I'd sure want a copy before I blew away Ubuntu.


    --
    P. V.
    "We're all in this together, I'm pulling for you." Red Green

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