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Thread: True Back Up

  1. #1

    Default True Back Up

    First post ....

    In openSuse.. the practical way to backup with a GUI application.

    a) Scenario: GRUB crashes or is modified/deleted.. (Obviously not due to ME... I'm and expert even though I just installed OpenSuse 11.4.... about 10 seconds ago..... if you know what I mean).

    b) Scenario: Installed/Updated SOMETHING and everything went weird.. (can't boot, nothing runs, KDE/GNOME is dead, end up at a command prompt but I don't know any commands!!!)

    Now I had an excellent OpenSuse running..... WHAT do I download to backup, WHAT do I back up so I can do a FRESH Operating System install (SuSe) and restore the rest (or most of it).

    SO:

    1: What's a good GUI tool?
    2: What Folders and Files/Directories do you backup to get back running ASAP?

    Thanks!

  2. #2
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    Default Re: True Back Up

    1 a GUI tool is something that gives you a GUI behind which a command line tool does the work
    2.as you had everything working before, you should be able to do a fresh install during which openSUSE will ignore your /home folder. The only things you need to back up in this case are any mysql databases or other tweaks you have done outside /home which you can then copy back once the fresh install is complete. For absolute safety, you could back up /home but, unless there is a hardware problem, this should not be needed.

    Note that all your personal settings and preferences are stored in /home; so none of these will be lost.

  3. #3
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    Default Re: True Back Up

    On 2011-03-31 04:36, AlexMingo wrote:

    > 1: What's a good GUI tool?


    Perhaps clonezilla or something of the sort.

    > 2: What Folders and Files/Directories do you backup to get back running
    > ASAP?


    ALL, in an image, for a total rescue op.

    --
    Cheers / Saludos,

    Carlos E. R.
    (from 11.2 x86_64 "Emerald" at Telcontar)

  4. #4

    Default Re: True Back Up

    as john_hudson said it should be fine to re-install the system as long as your /home directory is on a seperate partition.

    However what you're asking for, that can restore a system completely to a state it was in before is 'disk imaging' software. This is very common in the Windows world (since re-installing Windows plus all your applications is usually extremely time consuming) is also used a fair bit in Linux..

    You can either try a free open source program such as Clonezilla (Clonezilla - About) or try one of the many commercial products and see if it supports Linux (most support Linux partition types, not all may actually run on Linux).

  5. #5

    Default Re: True Back Up

    Thank you for your replies. I didn't know that /home would not be touched during a fresh install. Does the install program automatically leave /home untouched or does it prompt you?

    Thanks !

  6. #6

    Default Re: True Back Up

    It should automatically leave it alone, but only if it's on another partition. If you're not sure have a look at the output of the command 'df' (no quotes), or just post the output here and we'll tell you.

    There's also a GUI partitioning program if you go into YAST and type 'partitioner', although just use that to look at the setup - don't change anything unless you know what you're doing

  7. #7
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    Default Re: True Back Up

    Quote Originally Posted by AlexMingo View Post
    Does the install program automatically leave /home untouched or does it prompt you?
    With "/home" on a separate partition, install has always defaulted to leaving "/home" untouched. But I can override that if I try hard.

    Incidently, my personal idea of "true backup" is a command line backup that I can easily run while booted to a rescue CD or live CD. I currently use "tar" for that. I boot to a CD before making a backup (so that the files are idle). If I ever need to restore, I boot the CD, format and mount the partitions, then use "tar" to restore from the backup. Then I would have to reinstall grub to complete the restore.
    openSUSE Leap 15.1; KDE Plasma 5;
    testing Leap 15.2Alpha

  8. #8
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    Default Re: True Back Up

    On 2011-03-31 15:06, AlexMingo wrote:
    >
    > Thank you for your replies. I didn't know that /home would not be
    > touched during a fresh install. Does the install program automatically
    > leave /home untouched or does it prompt you?


    On a separate partition, yes - but always check for yourself. Read all the
    messages, check all the screens.

    --
    Cheers / Saludos,

    Carlos E. R.
    (from 11.2 x86_64 "Emerald" at Telcontar)

  9. #9

    Default Re: True Back Up

    Quote Originally Posted by nrickert View Post
    With "/home" on a separate partition, install has always defaulted to leaving "/home" untouched. But I can override that if I try hard.

    Incidently, my personal idea of "true backup" is a command line backup that I can easily run while booted to a rescue CD or live CD. I currently use "tar" for that. I boot to a CD before making a backup (so that the files are idle). If I ever need to restore, I boot the CD, format and mount the partitions, then use "tar" to restore from the backup. Then I would have to reinstall grub to complete the restore.
    Clonezilla is not a gui tool, it is a text based program - but it is guided, and fulfills the ease-of-use requirement you are looking for - mostly. It was written by folks in Hong Kong or Singapore, not sure which, so there are translation and usage issues - but you can figure it out. It is a very good tool, and uses several command line techniques (including dd, which you should look up) to get you a hard drive image that can be restored. Clonezilla is a B+ recommendation in my book. I don't have an A recommendation in this category. There used to be some commercial Windows tools that rated A (like ghost), but they were Windows/MSDos only. In some regards, clonezilla is superior to ghost.

    Putting /home on a separate partition is a very good practice. Creating a separate /home while doing a fresh install is fairly easy. Changing an existing install to use a separate partition for /home is easy, but can be problem filled. Lots of places to mess up. And, the responder who said that your personal stuff was all stored there was about 95% correct. There are some things stored in other locations, like /usr/bin - but these locations are variable, and are less frequently used. Re-using "/home" will get almost all of what you normally recognize as "my settings", and "my documents", and "my data".
    "Good judgment comes from experience, and a lot of that comes from bad judgment." - Will Rogers

    Learn from the mistakes of others. You cant live long enough to make them all yourself. - Eleanor Roosevelt

  10. #10
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    Default Re: True Back Up

    On 2011-03-31 21:36, spokesinger wrote:

    > Clonezilla is not a gui tool, it is a text based program - but it is
    > guided, and fulfills the ease-of-use requirement you are looking for -


    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of...software#Linux

    * Mondo Rescue
    * PartImage (SystemRescueCD)
    * Trinity Rescue Kit
    * ntfsclone - a utility in the package of ntfsprogs
    * partclone[3]
    * TeraByte Image for Linux
    * Redo Backup and Recovery

    --
    Cheers / Saludos,

    Carlos E. R.
    (from 11.2 x86_64 "Emerald" at Telcontar)

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