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Thread: Not a Suse question, but hardware

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    Default Not a Suse question, but hardware

    Hi, i noticed that my clock always has a different time. I tried with servers, did not work.
    Now i thought, ok, maybe its the battery from my motherboard. So i changed the battery.
    Did not help either.
    Is my motherboard broken or what is going on?
    This happens regardless what OS i run. So it must be a hardware thing. Just my guess.
    If someone knows a little hardware, that would be very helpful.

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    Smile Re: Not a Suse question, but hardware

    Hi, i noticed that my clock always has a different time. I tried with servers, did not work.
    Now i thought, ok, maybe its the battery from my motherboard. So i changed the battery.
    Did not help either.
    Is my motherboard broken or what is going on?
    This happens regardless what OS i run. So it must be a hardware thing. Just my guess.
    If someone knows a little hardware, that would be very helpful.
    First off, a PC hardware Real Time Clock's (RTC) do fail, but I suggest you give an example of how the time is off. Are we talking running fast or slow or are we off by a multiple of an hour? It makes a difference as to where you might look. For instance, I highly recommend you DO NOT SET your hardware clock to UTC, but local time, if you have a dual boot computer. The confusion this creates is beyond believe but time is always a multiple of hours off.

    Normally, when an OS loads, it takes its time from the Real Time Clock. After that, you run on software time. When you update your time, it normally modifies the software time and then syncs the RTC (Real Time Clock). A computer that seems to run fast or slow often is due to the crystal timebase that controls the computer CPU and bus is running fast or slow. A computer that is suddenly off after a reboot can mean a bad RTC. A bad battery will most often cause a loss of your CMOS configuration as well as a loss of time.

    In the end, any hardware issue that affects the time is a motherboard problem that can only be fixed with a replacement or new motherboard or of course a new computer.

    Thank You,
    My Blog: https://forums.opensuse.org/blogs/jdmcdaniel3/

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    Default Re: Not a Suse question, but hardware

    Quote Originally Posted by jdmcdaniel3 View Post
    First off, a PC hardware Real Time Clock's (RTC) do fail, but I suggest you give an example of how the time is off. Are we talking running fast or slow or are we off by a multiple of an hour? It makes a difference as to where you might look. For instance, I highly recommend you DO NOT SET your hardware clock to UTC, but local time, if you have a dual boot computer. The confusion this creates is beyond believe but time is always a multiple of hours off.

    Normally, when an OS loads, it takes its time from the Real Time Clock. After that, you run on software time. When you update your time, it normally modifies the software time and then syncs the RTC (Real Time Clock). A computer that seems to run fast or slow often is due to the crystal timebase that controls the computer CPU and bus is running fast or slow. A computer that is suddenly off after a reboot can mean a bad RTC. A bad battery will most often cause a loss of your CMOS configuration as well as a loss of time.

    In the end, any hardware issue that affects the time is a motherboard problem that can only be fixed with a replacement or new motherboard or of course a new computer.

    Thank You,
    Mm... i think i selected hardware at installation. If i check in the clock settings there is nothing with hardware.
    But anyway, its off by hours. Right now its about 9:23pm and my clock on the pc says its 2:22pm.
    So since the battery did not solve it, i must assume that my motherboard is defective.
    It never happend before and just recently. The motherboard is about 4 years old.

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    Default Re: Not a Suse question, but hardware

    Do you have windows on this machine too
    If you boot it, is the clock correct?
    Tumbleweed_KDE
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    Default Re: Not a Suse question, but hardware

    Quote Originally Posted by caf4926 View Post
    Do you have windows on this machine too
    If you boot it, is the clock correct?
    i haven't logged into windows today, but yesterday my time was wrong with kde and in windows it was correct. But i noticed that it also happens with windows before.
    For some reason i think i end up just getting a new motherboard. They are not that expensive anyway.

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    Default Re: Not a Suse question, but hardware

    If it is out by nearly an exact number of hours, this is probably a timezone problem.

    By default, Windows sets the hw clock to the local time zone. If you have linux assuming that it is set to UTC, then you will run into a problem.

    In recent Windows version (Vista and Window 7), there is a way of telling Windows to use UTC via the registry, while still displaying time in the local zone. I'm using that, and it solves some problems. But I had to tell Windows to never update from a timeserver - it seems that Windows cannot handle that with the hw clock set to UTC.
    openSUSE Leap 15.3; KDE Plasma 5.18.6;

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    Default Re: Not a Suse question, but hardware

    So long as you do this at this part of the install or set this in yast
    http://dl.dropbox.com/u/10573557/11....zone_clock.jpg

    I never have trouble
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    Default Re: Not a Suse question, but hardware

    Quote Originally Posted by caf4926 View Post
    So long as you do this at this part of the install or set this in yast
    http://dl.dropbox.com/u/10573557/11....zone_clock.jpg

    I never have trouble
    I changed it. I will track it from now on. If thats the solution, who knew. But it would make sense since it happened at the time i installed a windows partition.

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    Default Re: Not a Suse question, but hardware

    Generally I set the time to NTP
    Check the NTP daemon to run
    configure the NTP server if necessary
    apply
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    Default Re: Not a Suse question, but hardware

    It seems to have worked.
    I never would have thought about it, but you were right.
    I assume not even a new motherboard would have solved that problem. So thanks again

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