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Thread: Install Problem,

  1. #1

    Default Install Problem,

    Hi,

    Im currently trying to install OpenSuse but im running Windows 7 ntfs at the moment and obviously I cannot install suse on my C: because i need to format it in Fat32 first.

    Can i do it through the Live CD? Or even through the Suse install?

    Any suggestion?

  2. #2
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    Lightbulb Re: Install Problem,

    Hi,

    Im currently trying to install OpenSuse but im running Windows 7 ntfs at the moment and obviously I cannot install suse on my C: because i need to format it in Fat32 first.

    Can i do it through the Live CD? Or even through the Suse install?

    Any suggestion?
    Wait! Wait, do not anything Yet. Please read my next message NEO-BAHAMUT-!
    My Blog: https://forums.opensuse.org/blogs/jdmcdaniel3/

    Software efficiency halves every 18 months, thus compensating for Moore's Law

    Its James again from Austin, Texas

  3. #3

    Default Re: Install Problem,

    :-D

    Ok mate im waiting on your next reply. Im currently burning the 11.4 install DVD whilst i wait.

  4. #4
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    Smile Re: Install Problem,

    NEO-BAHAMUT-, openSUSE does not require that you create any partitions for it beforehand and further it does not use FAT32 partitions to load openSUSE. openSUSE can read and use both existing FAT32 and NTFS partitions, but do not create any more of them for openSUSE.

    Now, if you have Windows 7 installed and want to dual boot with openSUSE, you might want to do the following to create some space for openSUSE to use.

    1. Uninstall any Windows applications you do not need.
    2. Empty the trash and clear out all temporary files in Internet Explorer and on the main Windows Partition.
    3. Do a complete Disk Defragmentation operation in Windows.
    4. Run the Windows Disk Manager and reduce the size of the main Windows Partition if you can. Make sure to leave Windows at least 20 % of the total free space as I assume you still want Windows 7 to work. Try to free up 40 to 80 GB for openSUSE to install.

    When you install openSUSE, it will then see the free space and attempt to create a partition setup that will allow Windows 7 to still operate along side of openSUSE. If the space is too small, it may attempt to further reduce the Windows 7 Partition Size.

    Thank You,
    My Blog: https://forums.opensuse.org/blogs/jdmcdaniel3/

    Software efficiency halves every 18 months, thus compensating for Moore's Law

    Its James again from Austin, Texas

  5. #5
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    Smile Re: Install Problem,

    Here is some information on Disk Partitioning:

    Each hard drive can have up to four PRIMARY partitions, any of which could be marked active and bootable. No matter what you might hear, only one of the first four primary partitions can be booted from. That means you can boot from Primary partitions 1, 2, 3 or 4 and that is all. In order to boot openSUSE, you must load openSUSE and the grub boot loader into one of the first four partitions. Or, your second choice is to load the grub boot loader into the MBR (Master Boot Record) at the start of the disk. The MBR can be blank, like a new disk, it can contain a Windows partition booting code or generic booting code to boot the active partition 1, 2, 3, or 4. Or, as stated before, it can contain the grub boot loader. Why load grub into the MBR then? You do this so that you can "boot" openSUSE from a logical partition, numbered 5 or higher, which is not normally possible. In order to have more than four partitions, one of them (and only one can be assigned as extended) must be a extended partition. It is called an Extended Primary Partition, a container partition, it can be any one of the first four and it can contain one or more logical partitions within. Anytime you see partition numbers 5, 6 or higher for instance, they can only occur inside of the one and only Extended Primary partition you could have.

    What does openSUSE want as far as partitions? It needs at minimum a SWAP partition and a "/" partition where all of your software is loaded. Further, it is recommended you create a separate /home partition, which makes it easier to upgrade or reload openSUSE without losing all of your settings. So, that is three more partitions you must add to what you have now. I always suggest that you do not load grub into the MBR, but rather into the openSUSE "/" root primary partition which means a primary number of 1, 2, 3 or 4. If number one is used, then that will be out. You will mark the openSUSE partition as active for booting and finally you must load generic booting code into the MBR so that it will boot the openSUSE partition. I suggest a partition like this:

    Code:
    0. /dev/sda, Load MBR with generic booting code
    1. /dev/sda1, Primary NTFS Partition for Windows 7
    2. /dev/sda2, Primary SWAP (4 GB)
    3. /dev/sda3, Primary EXT4 "/" openSUSE Partition Marked Active for booting (80-120 GB)
    4. /dev/sda4, Primary EXT4 "/home" Your main home directory (Rest of the disk)
    OR, if Windows 7 has two partitions:

    Code:
    0. /dev/sda, Load MBR with generic booting code
    1. /dev/sda1, Primary 100 MB Small Booting Partition for Windows 7
    2. /dev/sda2, Primary NTFS Partition for Windows 7
    3. /dev/sda3, Primary EXT4 "/" openSUSE Partition Marked Active for booting (~= 40 GB)
    4. /dev/sda4, Extended Primary Partition, a Logical Partition Container
    5. /dev/sda5, Primary SWAP (4 GB)
    6. /dev/sda6, Primary EXT4 "/home" Your main home directory (Rest of the disk)
    Thank You,
    My Blog: https://forums.opensuse.org/blogs/jdmcdaniel3/

    Software efficiency halves every 18 months, thus compensating for Moore's Law

    Its James again from Austin, Texas

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Install Problem,

    On Fri March 25 2011 07:36 pm, NEO-BAHAMUT- wrote:

    >
    > Hi,
    >
    > Im currently trying to install OpenSuse but im running Windows 7 ntfs
    > at the moment and obviously I cannot install suse on my C: because i
    > need to format it in Fat32 first.
    >
    > Can i do it through the Live CD? Or even through the Suse install?
    >
    > Any suggestion?
    >
    >

    Why do you need to format your disk with Fat32? This is most definitely not
    a requirement for OpenSuse.
    --
    P. V.
    "We're all in this together, I'm pulling for you." Red Green

  7. #7

    Default Re: Install Problem,

    Hi unfortunately i was being very dim.

    I was of the understanding Linux needed fat 32 to run properly. Anyway im currently writing this post on OpenSuse 11.4 via the Chromium browser that i've installed.

    Currently i have no sound... Not sure why as its picked up my sound card and also i don't have any codecs installed... or this is my understanding as its failing to play .mp3.

  8. #8
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    Smile Re: Install Problem,

    Hi unfortunately i was being very dim.

    I was of the understanding Linux needed fat 32 to run properly. Anyway im currently writing this post on OpenSuse 11.4 via the Chromium browser that i've installed.

    Currently i have no sound... Not sure why as its picked up my sound card and also i don't have any codecs installed... or this is my understanding as its failing to play .mp3.
    Well, your first reading needs to be here. Do not get in a hurry:

    New User How To/FAQ (read only)

    Basically openSUSE and Linux are free and does not includes files that might require the paying of royalties. There four, it requires some extra effort to download and install codecs that allow one to play multimedia files. You may want to read this thread here as well:

    Packman Layout Explained

    Packman is were almost everything, outside of the openSUSE repositories is obtained with the very small exception of the libdvdcss file, required to view DVD movies.

    As for sound, the simple answer is to go to:

    YaST / Hardware / Sound and make sure your primary card is listed as "0" or first. You can test its sound there as well. I have a sound testing script file you can obtain from here:

    S.T.A.R.T. - SuSE Terminal Audio Reporting Tool

    I have a multimedia testing script file you can get here:

    MultiMedia Checker or mmcheck - Check Your openSUSE MultiMedia Setup in Just 16 Steps

    This is a lot of information. Take your time. If you have a new question, not about installing openSUSE, consider starting a new thread about the problem, like for your sound. But read read read first. Good Luck and Welcome to openSUSE!

    Thank You,
    My Blog: https://forums.opensuse.org/blogs/jdmcdaniel3/

    Software efficiency halves every 18 months, thus compensating for Moore's Law

    Its James again from Austin, Texas

  9. #9

    Default Re: Install Problem,

    Hi mate,

    Right ive finally got my 2nd monitor picked up so now im running dual monitors again woo

    Got sound working. It seemed that suse picked up my gfx card as my primary sound card... Strange. Just need to look at codecs now and then i can look at reading about the OS. So if i might ask. Would you EVER consider going back to Windows after using this? So far its an EXCITING experience for myself.

  10. #10
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    Smile Re: Install Problem,

    Hi mate,

    Right ive finally got my 2nd monitor picked up so now im running dual monitors again woo

    Got sound working. It seemed that suse picked up my gfx card as my primary sound card... Strange. Just need to look at codecs now and then i can look at reading about the OS. So if i might ask. Would you EVER consider going back to Windows after using this? So far its an EXCITING experience for myself.
    Well, I use Linux almost all of the time except when at work. None the less, I did purchase two copies of Windows 7, as it seems to work OK for Windows and I use it for anything that can not be done with Linux. For instance I have a TV Tuner card running as a PVR in Windows, a task that never worked well for me in Linux. Second I have purchased a few programs, that could only be found to work with Windows. So, I use Windows when I must, dual boot most computers, but spend hours and hours in Linux. I do know some Linux purest that would never do as I, but I feel I am a realist on this subject. If you own a copy of Windows, use when it can only be done with Windows and use Linux for everything else.

    Thank You,
    My Blog: https://forums.opensuse.org/blogs/jdmcdaniel3/

    Software efficiency halves every 18 months, thus compensating for Moore's Law

    Its James again from Austin, Texas

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