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Thread: Is my os already corrupt?

  1. #21
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    Default Re: Is my os already corrupt?

    Quote Originally Posted by mlmack View Post
    I'm afraid 'konqueror --profile filemanagement' brings up the same window. It never occured to me that there might be a man page. I'll check it out and see what I can figure out.

    You're quite right about 'wonky' Gogolthorp. I'm tired and cranky and so many things are off for a fresh install.

    A second user didn't seem to have any kmixer problems. Can that kind of thing still be fixed by deleting the config file?

    If the makers are going to save the root password anyhow, why have a checkbox?

    What now?
    From my experience I think the password is never saved whether You check the box or not. When You check the box the password is cached somewhere and it is there untill You log out or reboot. It's probably cleared at some other occasions too.

    If You uncheck the box enter the password, close YAST and try to open it again You have to type the password once more. It is not the case when You check the save password box.

    Concerning the Kmix problem : yes it can be fixed by for example remaining specific configuration files. The easy way out is to rename the whole .kde4 folder which is stored in your home but this will 'restart' all Your KDE settings for example plasmoids on the desktop and so on. The other way is to compare the .kde4 folders in your home directory and the new users home directory and see what's different. The last option is to wait for someone to tell You in which configuration file exactly the settings are stored

    Best regards,
    Greg
    Best regards,
    Greg

  2. #22
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    Default Re: Is my os already corrupt?

    The 2 files in the home folderf are long. Since I couldn't make any sense out of the diff output, I copied the others (with chown and chgrp) into my home directory. That started the process but didn't open the mixer. So I changed them back.

  3. #23
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    Default Re: Is my os already corrupt?

    On 03/10/2011 12:36 AM, mlmack wrote:
    >
    > There are 2 gigs of RAM.


    i would have expected more than 15 passes in 12 hours.
    one pass with 1 GB of ram takes about 15 minutes, last time i looked..


    > On some reboots, the system rejects one of my drives.


    this is new information! without that information i had to wonder why
    you were focusing on a hard drive problem....sure, it could be that
    some bits on your hard drive are getting scrambled (and, thereby
    causing the other symptoms you mention..

    and, maybe that is the problem....

    but, things that happen on some (not all) reboots are really hard to
    track down....tell me: do you have this problem only when something
    occured in the just preceding session unusual...like maybe you had a
    forced shutdown, or a "crash" or some other thing which cause you to
    shutdown without using the normal shutdown routine (clicking exit and
    having an orderly shut down)..

    if something like that is not occurring, then maybe you just have a
    loose connection at either end of the cable between that harddrive and
    the motherboard..

    ok so now we have more new information: you have two hard
    drives....tell us, are either of them on a USB....is the Linux system
    on a USB drive?


    > It always fscks
    > clean. The error message says / is not corrupted. Shouldn't one fsck
    > periodically?


    depends....here, if things are going smooth (and they usually do) i
    only fsck when the system forces it (every 60 days, i think)


    > When you log in to yast the password panel is labeled su.


    ah, i never noticed that before... mine is labeled as "Run as root --
    KDE su"

    > I never check 'remember password' but it checked itself.


    that is a VERY bad sign!! anytime check boxes check themselves you
    have to assume you have garbled and corrupted bits on your hard drive...

    i would suggest you back up all personal data, music, movies, letter
    to Aunt Minnie, and etc....just in case....perhaps instead of a loose
    drive cable you have more serious problems..

    you asked earlier about smartctl: all options are listed for you if
    you open a terminal and enter

    Code:
    man smartctl
    nevertheless, to save you some reading you might just use

    Code:
    smartctl -a [drive designation]
    i don't what you need to put in for a "drive designation" but here i
    use "/dev/sda"...i don't know what you need to use because for all i
    know you have 15 drives, and i don't know which one might be the
    problem......but, you probably should be able to figure it out by
    opening a terminal and looking at the output of one or more of these:

    Code:
    sudo /sbin/fdisk -l
    cat /etc/fstab
    df -h

    > Nevertheless I get asked for
    > the root password about half the time; with 'remember password'
    > checked.


    very spooky and very bad.


    > Log in manager: Log in screen will only display root.


    this is the MOST troublesome....because openSUSE is born *without* a
    root listed on the log in screen..

    i have asked twice and not received an answer "was your system as you
    describe it from the very first boot after install? or could you log
    in as yourself a while and then suddenly things changed?"

    and, i have asked once and not had an answer:

    "how many times have you logged into KDE or Gnome as root? and what
    did you do are root then?"

    and

    "is this a dual boot machine? what other system is on it?"




    > The only way to
    > get it off is to uncheck 'list users'. There are 2 users.
    >
    > I would prefer to use Konqueror as a file manager except that profile
    > changes will not save. Save profile as file manager locked it into KHTML
    > view.



    please do not introduce new problems into this thread...instead please
    begin a new thread with a subject reflecting your problems (that is:
    "why won't konqueror save my profile" does not equal "is my os corrupt")


    > The only live cd available is Mint. I tried it before the sound problem
    > was fixed. Didn't look too deeply. It couldn't see half my drives and
    > couldn't play the mp3 that was included.


    show us the output of

    Code:
    sudo /sbin/fdisk -l
    cat /etc/fstab
    df -h
    copy/paste the output back to this thread using the instructions here:
    http://goo.gl/i3wnr



    > To see what sound problems I had, check the 'Bizarre sound' thread.


    i'm not a sound guy...and i go to sleep trying to read those
    thread...but, i AM beginning to think that somehow, during your
    earlier problem resolution attempts you have logged into KDE or Gnome
    (i can't find where you said which you use) as root, and then somehow
    scrambled your system..

    the resolution MAY be to do another install and never log into KDE or
    Gnome as root again, and never mess with with users are shown on the
    log in screen again, and . . .


    > The sound problem was the same in 3 clean, [U]careful[U] installs.


    i know some operating systems magically 'fix' themselves if you
    install them often enough....but, to me that just proves how unstable
    they are....i mean a professional, stable, enterprise level production
    operating system should _always_ have exactly the same problem *every*
    time it is installed into a machine in which the hardware is not
    supported, out of the box..

    so, if i had a sound problem after the first install (that i was
    certain came from a 100% perfect install medium, and i didn't mess up
    the install somehow) i'd _expect_ the next 2 or 200 to also have
    exactly the same sound problem!


    > Satisfied? I'm no hotshot but I'm not a total idiot.


    if you think i do this to be 'satisifed' by you, you are mistaken..

    if you think i think you are a "total idiot" then i see no way to
    continue trying to help you...sorrry.

    --
    DenverD
    CAVEAT: http://is.gd/bpoMD
    [NNTP posted w/openSUSE 11.3, KDE4.5.5, Thunderbird3.0.11, nVidia
    173.14.28 3D, Athlon 64 3000+]
    "It is far easier to read, understand and follow the instructions than
    to undo the problems caused by not." DD 23 Jan 11

  4. #24
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    Default Re: Is my os already corrupt?

    > On some reboots, the system rejects one of my drives.

    It happened during installation, about a third of the time. Boot failed at drive d so I ****** d. It worked at the time. It hasn't happened since the current installation.

    > I never check 'remember password' but it checked itself.

    Another poster seemed to think it was normal. Me, I have no idea.

    >smartcrl

    I know it's considered iffy but I've used it before and it was sometimes useful. Asked about options because I thought you might want special information.

    >Code output. The instructions were too small to read and wouldn't enlarge so let me try this:

    sudo>

    Disk /dev/sda: 1000.2 GB, 1000204886016 bytes
    255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 121601 cylinders
    Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
    Disk identifier: 0x000534c4

    Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
    /dev/sda1 2 131 1044225 82 Linux swap / Solaris
    /dev/sda2 * 132 4047 31455270 83 Linux
    /dev/sda3 4048 121601 944252505 83 Linux

    Disk /dev/sdb: 160.0 GB, 160041885696 bytes
    255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 19457 cylinders
    Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
    Disk identifier: 0x00002e2f

    Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
    /dev/sdb1 1 131 1052226 82 Linux swap / Solaris
    /dev/sdb2 * 132 19457 155236095 83 Linux

    Disk /dev/sdc: 320.1 GB, 320072933376 bytes
    255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 38913 cylinders
    Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
    Disk identifier: 0x02390239

    Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
    /dev/sdc1 * 1 37582 301877383+ 83 Linux
    /dev/sdc2 37583 38235 5245222+ 83 Linux
    /dev/sdc3 38236 38913 5446035 83 Linux

    Disk /dev/sdd: 1000.2 GB, 1000204886016 bytes
    255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 121601 cylinders
    Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
    Disk identifier: 0x0001a33a

    Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
    /dev/sdd1 1 121601 976760001 83 Linux

    Disk /dev/sde: 250.1 GB, 250059350016 bytes
    255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 30401 cylinders
    Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
    Disk identifier: 0x0009209f

    Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
    /dev/sde1 132 30401 243143775 83 Linux

    Disk /dev/sdf: 1000.2 GB, 1000204886016 bytes
    255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 121601 cylinders
    Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
    Disk identifier: 0x000970ee

    Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
    /dev/sdf1 1 121601 976760001 83 Linux

    Disk /dev/sdh: 750.2 GB, 750156374016 bytes
    255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 91201 cylinders
    Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
    Disk identifier: 0x00055847

    Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
    /dev/sdh1 1 91201 732572001 83 Linux
    Note: sector size is 2048 (not 512)

    Disk /dev/sdg: 7854 MB, 7854358528 bytes
    211 heads, 32 sectors/track, 568 cylinders
    Units = cylinders of 6752 * 2048 = 13828096 bytes
    Disk identifier: 0x00000000

    Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System
    /dev/sdg1 1 568 7670266 b W95 FAT32
    mlmack@orca:~>

    fstab>

    mlmack@orca:~> cat /etc/fstab
    /dev/disk/by-id/ata-WDC_WD1600JB-00GVA0_WD-WMAL92322914-part1 swap swap defaults 0 0
    /dev/disk/by-id/ata-WDC_WD1001FALS-00E3A0_WD-WCATR0092075-part1 swap swap defaults 0 0
    /dev/disk/by-id/ata-WDC_WD1001FALS-00E3A0_WD-WCATR0092075-part2 / ext3 acl,user_xattr 1 1
    /dev/disk/by-id/ata-WDC_WD1600JB-00GVA0_WD-WMAL92322914-part2 /a ext3 defaults 1 2
    /dev/disk/by-id/ata-WDC_WD3200AAJB-00WGA0_WD-WCARW3541543-part1 /b ext3 defaults 1 2
    /dev/disk/by-id/ata-WDC_WD1001FALS-00E3A0_WD-WCATR0092075-part3 /home ext3 acl,user_xattr 1 2
    /dev/disk/by-id/usb-WDC_WD10_02FAEX-00Z3A0_FDC0FD100200000FD0FCAFF5075252-0:0-part1 /local ext3 acl,user_xattr 1 2
    proc /proc proc defaults 0 0
    sysfs /sys sysfs noauto 0 0
    debugfs /sys/kernel/debug debugfs noauto 0 0
    usbfs /proc/bus/usb usbfs noauto 0 0
    devpts /dev/pts devpts mode=0620,gid=5 0 0
    /dev/disk/by-id/usb-WDC_WD75_00AACS-65D6B0_WDC_WD7500_WD-WCAU50062547-0:0-part1 /local2 ext3 defaults 1 2
    mlmack@orca:~>

    df>

    mlmack@orca:~> df -h
    Filesystem Size Used Avail Use% Mounted on
    /dev/sda2 30G 5.6G 23G 20% /
    udev 994M 720K 993M 1% /dev
    /dev/sdb2 146G 96G 43G 70% /a
    /dev/sdc1 284G 235G 35G 88% /b
    /dev/sda3 887G 717G 125G 86% /home
    /dev/sdf1 917G 719G 152G 83% /local
    /dev/sdh1 688G 297G 356G 46% /local2
    mlmack@orca:~>

    root>

    Although I sometimes su, I almost never log in as root unless it's for a chore I don 't know how to do in a console. I think I know enough to avoid screwing up the system. I try to err on the side of paranoia.

    install medium>

    The tool on the cd said the cd was ok. However trustworthy that is. Perhaps I should mention that I used automatic hardware configuration.

    i have asked twice and not received an answer "was your system as you
    describe it from the very first boot after install? or could you log
    in as yourself a while and then suddenly things changed?">

    First install was single user. That worked fine. When I added my wife's account, things got odd. Can't remember the order though. Non log in problems were ab origine.

    Satisfied>

    You appeared to be asking for lists of glitches, of which there are many. Satisfied in that sense.

    total idiot>

    I may know a lot more than the average newbie but it's not nearly as much as I should. You seemed to be getting rather testy with my ignorance, Sorry.


    OK. What next?

  5. #25
    Will Honea NNTP User

    Default Re: Is my os already corrupt?

    mlmack wrote:

    > It happened during installation, about a third of the time. Boot failed
    > at drive d so I ****** d. It worked at the time. It hasn't happened
    > since the current installation.


    The more you write, the more I think it's time to re-seat your cables. You
    are describing classic connector problems, especially if you've had the
    covers off recently.

    --
    Will Honea

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
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    Europe
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    Default Re: Is my os already corrupt?

    Quote Originally Posted by mlmack View Post
    > I never check 'remember password' but it checked itself.

    Another poster seemed to think it was normal. Me, I have no idea.
    The settings of the authentification dialog seem to be tracked separately.

    So, for instance the authentification dialog that you see when you run YaST as root (of course) does not seem to have anything to do with the dialog that you see when you run KWrite as root. And an (un)checked "Remember Password" for YaST will hold for YaST, and an (un)checked "Remember Password" for KWrite as root will hold for KWrite as root.

  7. #27
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    Default Re: Is my os already corrupt?

    On 03/10/2011 08:24 PM, Will Honea wrote:

    > The more you write, the more I think it's time to re-seat your cables.


    at least check connection, and possibly even replace some cables..

    --
    DenverD
    CAVEAT: http://is.gd/bpoMD
    [NNTP posted w/openSUSE 11.3, KDE4.5.5, Thunderbird3.0.11, nVidia
    173.14.28 3D, Athlon 64 3000+]
    "It is far easier to read, understand and follow the instructions than
    to undo the problems caused by not." DD 23 Jan 11

  8. #28
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    Default Re: Is my os already corrupt?

    On 03/10/2011 08:06 PM, mlmack wrote:
    >
    >> I never check 'remember password' but it checked itself.

    > Another poster seemed to think it was normal. Me, I have no idea.


    the other poster is incorrect in asumming it normal for check boxes to
    check itself--to me it mean only one of two things:

    - one or more of you hard drives has some garbled bits, or
    - you or someone else checked the "remember password" block,
    intentionally or not

    to me, it is worrisome.


    >> smartcrl

    >
    > I know it's considered iffy but I've used it before and it was
    > sometimes useful. Asked about options because I thought you might want
    > special information.


    you should check the output...i can't do it for you, i don't have the
    patience to do that for you..



    >> Code output.[sniped out all the output]


    WHEW, that is lot of drive space, and a LOT of it used already..

    i'd say with an unknown reliability of your system at this point i'd
    think it prudent you do something to protect the investment you have
    in data....backup to off machine is always a good idea..

    >
    > root>
    >
    > Although I sometimes su, I almost never log in as root unless it's for
    > a chore I don 't know how to do in a console.


    you should strive to learn how to do all root/administrative duties
    either using a gui tool launched as root (as is YaST, or (say) kwrite
    launched as root, etc)...

    you should never log into KDE/Gnome/XFCE or any other *nix-like
    graphical user interface desktop environment as root..

    doing so 1) opens you up to several different security problems if you
    (for example) browse the net, 2) too many too easy ways to damage your
    system no matter how careful your actions (for example: well
    documented cases of unintended change of ownership of ~/.ICEauthority
    and ~/.Xauthority from user to root sometimes occurs), 3) and, anyway
    logging into KDE/etc as root is *never* required to do any and all
    administrative duties..

    so, always log in as yourself, and "become root" by using a root
    powered application (like YaST, File Manager Superuser Mode) or using
    "su -", sudo, kdesu, or gnomesu in a terminal to launch whatever tool
    is needed (like Kwrite to edit a config file)...read more on all that
    here:

    http://en.opensuse.org/SDB:Login_as_root
    http://tinyurl.com/ydbwssh
    http://tinyurl.com/6ry6yd

    http://tinyurl.com/4nsaqst

    additionally: after logging into KDE/Gnome/etc as root, if you
    experience problems (for example, with uncommanded file ownership and
    permissions changes) and if you can provide us with details of what
    you were doing while you were logged in as root, that would help us
    identify if there's a bug that needs to be fixed...thanks for your help..



    > I think I know enough to avoid screwing up the system.


    that is easier to say than to do---well, me say this way: i have been
    using Linux for a good long while and i will NOT log into KDE or Gnome
    as root because i do *NOT* know how to log into KDE or Gnome AND
    absolutely, without question avoid screwing up the system..

    there are other helpers her who just flat refuse to even try to help
    folks who have logged into the GUI as root--because it is SO very easy
    to murder a system.....cause little things that just do not make
    sense---like the symptoms you give.


    > I try to err on the side of paranoia.


    on that, we see eye to eye..



    > install medium>
    >
    > The tool on the cd said the cd was ok. However trustworthy that is.


    as far as i know, if it passes, the medium is good.

    of course, the reason i wanted to hear the install medium was ok was
    because that might have been the source of the problem--but it was
    not, so we still do not know the problem, only the symptoms

    actually, i WANTED to hear that the medium failed--because that would
    probably mean your drives were ok, OR something else in the system
    wasn't wacky...and it is so easy to fix (start over)


    so, we are down to:

    > First install was single user. That worked fine. When I added my wife's
    > account, things got odd. Can't remember the order though. Non log in
    > problems were ab origine.


    ok, so something went wrong adding a new user....and, suddenly the log
    in page had only one user named, and that was 'root'..

    so, how did you add the new user? did you do that using YaST, or what?

    at this point i can only guess one of two things will solve you problem:

    1. fix the hardware problem (maybe loose connectors or faulty cables)

    2. start over, because something killed your system (most probably
    when you added the new user) and i have no idea where to begin to try
    to fix it...so a careful reinstall after backing up and checking
    cabling/connectors..

    hmmmmm...i just had another few thoughts:

    do you have a heat problem with all of those drives?
    is your power supply hefty enough to drive all your hardware?


    > Satisfied>
    >
    > You appeared to be asking for lists of glitches, of which there are
    > many. Satisfied in that sense.


    i was just trying to logically work through the possibilities....


    > total idiot>
    >
    > I may know a lot more than the average newbie but it's not nearly as
    > much as I should. You seemed to be getting rather testy with my
    > ignorance, Sorry.


    no, i was getting VERY testy in your ability to overlook questions
    which were and ARE important: the fact that you had a good install and
    then it broke while adding a user, as root could have saved me a LOT
    of time, had you mentioned that in your first post.


    > OK. What next?


    if i were sitting AT your machine i would have no idea how to repair
    it (other than what i have already told you above)....so, it is your move!

    --
    DenverD
    CAVEAT: http://is.gd/bpoMD
    [NNTP posted w/openSUSE 11.3, KDE4.5.5, Thunderbird3.0.11, nVidia
    173.14.28 3D, Athlon 64 3000+]
    "It is far easier to read, understand and follow the instructions than
    to undo the problems caused by not." DD 23 Jan 11

  9. #29
    Join Date
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    15,818

    Default Re: Is my os already corrupt?

    Boot to a terminal (type 3 at boot) try to log in as yourself. Does this work?
    Look at the ownership of the files in your home directory

    type
    su
    then root password
    ls -l | less

    this will list the home files and tell you the owner. If any are root this can be cause by doing things in a root GUI

  10. #30
    Join Date
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    Earth - Denmark
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    Default Re: Is my os already corrupt?

    On 03/10/2011 10:06 PM, gogalthorp wrote:
    >
    > this will list the home files and tell you the owner. If any are root
    > this can be cause by doing things in a root GUI


    all very true, but it does not explain the changes to the log in
    screen, nor the mysterious check box checking its self, and the crashes..

    more got messed up than just the home directory..

    --
    DenverD
    CAVEAT: http://is.gd/bpoMD
    [NNTP posted w/openSUSE 11.3, KDE4.5.5, Thunderbird3.0.11, nVidia
    173.14.28 3D, Athlon 64 3000+]
    "It is far easier to read, understand and follow the instructions than
    to undo the problems caused by not." DD 23 Jan 11

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