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Thread: How to unmount the /home partition in order to be able change it's size.

  1. #1

    Default How to unmount the /home partition in order to be able change it's size.

    When running the umount command like this as superuser: umount /dev/sda8.
    I get the following message:umount: /home: device is busy.
    (In some cases useful info about processes that use
    the device is found by lsof(8) or fuser(1))

    Thanks in advance/
    larilund

  2. #2
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    Default Re: How to unmount the /home partition in order to be able changeit's size.

    Am 14.10.2010 22:06, schrieb larilund:
    >
    > When running the umount command like this as superuser: umount
    > /dev/sda8.
    > I get the following message:umount: /home: device is busy.
    > (In some cases useful info about processes that use
    > the device is found by lsof(8) or fuser(1))
    >
    > Thanks in advance/
    > larilund
    >
    >


    You should make sure that no user is logged on at that moment.

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    LXDE team

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    Default Re: How to unmount the /home partition in order to be able change it's size.

    Booting from a liveCD like Downloads to make the changes I have found to be best.

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    Default Re: How to unmount the /home partition in order to be able change it's size.

    Make sure /home is a separate partition, not just a directory under / with:
    Code:
    df -l
    Are you running the umount command from a terminal window from your desktop? That's why /home is busy, your desktop is running from your home directory.

    Log out of your desktop, and at the GUI login screen choose Console Login from the menu at the lower left of the screen. Log in as root and run the umount command,

    Code:
    umount /home
    It will succeed if no one else is logged in and using the /home partition.
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    Default Re: How to unmount the /home partition in order to be able change it's size.

    Provided that /home is on a different partition, you can login as root

    Via yast umount /home, re-size the partition and mount /home.

    Whilst I never had problems with it, save your user data first !

    Other than that take on the suggestion from #3 dvhenry.

    cheers
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  6. #6

    Default Re: How to unmount the /home partition in order to be able change it's size.

    Quote Originally Posted by otto_oz View Post
    Provided that /home is on a different partition, you can login as root

    Via yast umount /home, re-size the partition and mount /home.

    Whilst I never had problems with it, save your user data first !

    Other than that take on the suggestion from #3 dvhenry.

    cheers
    I log in as root in the terminal window and then I go to YaST2/YaST Control Centre/Partitioner and unmount /home. And when I try to change the size, I receive an error message: partition /dev/sda8 cannot be resized because the filesystem seems to be inconsistent.

    What is wrong?

  7. #7
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    Default Re: How to unmount the /home partition in order to be able change it's size.

    I receive an error message: partition /dev/sda8 cannot be resized because the filesystem seems to be inconsistent.
    Have you ran fsck on that file system?

  8. #8

    Default Re: How to unmount the /home partition in order to be able change it's size.

    Quote Originally Posted by dvhenry View Post
    Have you ran fsck on that file system?
    I tried, but since I am not able to unmount it, I get this message:
    linux-ntww:/home/lars # fsck /dev/sda8
    fsck from util-linux-ng 2.16
    e2fsck 1.41.9 (22-Aug-2009)
    /dev/sda8 is mounted.

    WARNING!!! Running e2fsck on a mounted filesystem may cause
    SEVERE filesystem damage.

    Do you really want to continue (y/n)?

  9. #9
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    Default Re: How to unmount the /home partition in order to be able change it's size.

    My suggestion here is again going to be that liveCD,Downloads It's a small download ( about 130MB) with many useful tools. The point being, you won't receive any " filesvstem is mounted" errors and can just work on it.

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    Default Re: How to unmount the /home partition in order to be able change it's size.

    Quote Originally Posted by larilund View Post
    I tried, but since I am not able to unmount it, I get this message:
    linux-ntww:/home/lars # fsck /dev/sda8
    fsck from util-linux-ng 2.16
    e2fsck 1.41.9 (22-Aug-2009)
    /dev/sda8 is mounted.

    WARNING!!! Running e2fsck on a mounted filesystem may cause
    SEVERE filesystem damage.

    Do you really want to continue (y/n)?
    That shell prompt gives away why you can't unmount it. You are running in the directory /home/lars. Even if you were to cd to /, you might still have a GUI session with lots of processes with files open in /home.

    To have a good chance of being able to unmount /home, you need to login as root from on a console, and nowhere else. But that means you have to work with the CLI.

    I'm with dvhenry here: use a live CD to do this resizing. Then there is no question of it being mounted and you can fsck it for sure before doing the resize.

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