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Thread: Virtualization Software

  1. #1

    Default Virtualization Software

    Can anyone suggest a good free Virtualization Software Package that work on OpenSuse with the KDE Desktop, as I need to use Windows for some applications that have not got a Linux equivelant, Namely Reserch In Motions BlackBerry Desktop Manager and the drivers for my Printer and Scanner, so I would also need something with USB pass through. Or if there isn't any free virtualization software that will dowat I want that's free then something that is not expensive that's paid for. I like the look of Parallels Desktop 4 for Windows & Linux but I'm not sure if I would be able to justify paying 54.99 for the ammount of use that it will get?

    Roland

  2. #2
    Join Date
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    Little Exuma, Bahamas
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    Default Re: Virtualization Software

    I've had great luck with VirtualBox. It can be installed with Yast and activating the USB pass through is quite simple.
    MS user 1988-2008, Linux user 1998-present, openSUSE user since 2004
    (The first computer I used had a punch card reader)

  3. #3

    Default Re: Virtualization Software

    VirtualBox

    Linux_Downloads - VirtualBox

    @ caprus - beat me to it !

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Adelaide, Australia
    Posts
    963

    Default Re: Virtualization Software

    Have you heard of VirtualBox? It is an excellent free virtual machine software:

    VirtualBox

    Here is a guide how to install it on openSUSE:

    Virtual Box (Sun Version) Install HowTo
    Desktop: Gigabyte GA-Z270-HD3 - Core i7 7700K - openSUSE Leap 42.2 KDE
    Laptop: HP EliteBook 8770W - Core i7 3940XM - openSUSE Leap 42.2 KDE

  5. #5

    Default Re: Virtualization Software

    I've tried using VirtualBox when I used Ubuntu 10.04 but never had any luck Installing Windows XP and couldn't find a way to enable USB pass through. I might have to give it a try now that I'm using OpenSuse.

    Roland

  6. #6
    Join Date
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    Default Re: Virtualization Software

    Running a legal XP here. USB pass through only in the download version from VirtualBox AFAIK. Never worked with the packages from the repos/distro for me, but I must admit that I have not installed from the repos for a couple of years now.
    ° Appreciate my reply? Click the star and let me know why.

    ° Perfection is not gonna happen. No way.

    https://en.opensuse.org/openSUSE:Board#Members
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  7. #7
    Join Date
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    Default Re: Virtualization Software

    After you have installed VirtualBox make sure you are part of the VBoxUsers group. You can add yourself to the group by going into YaST->Security and Users->User and Group Management->Groups. Then select vboxusers, click edit and tick your username under "Group Members". Then hit OK.
    Desktop: Gigabyte GA-Z270-HD3 - Core i7 7700K - openSUSE Leap 42.2 KDE
    Laptop: HP EliteBook 8770W - Core i7 3940XM - openSUSE Leap 42.2 KDE

  8. #8
    Carlos E. R. NNTP User

    Default Re: Virtualization Software

    On 2010-10-04 13:06, Rolandh31 wrote:
    >
    > Can anyone suggest a good free Virtualization Software Package that work
    > on OpenSuse with the KDE Desktop, as I need to use Windows for some
    > applications that have not got a Linux equivelant, Namely Reserch In


    Everybody suggest virtualbox, so I'll add vmware. Not free, but with gratis versions. There is the
    server version (gratis, gives some problems currently, and may disappear soon), the player (a bit
    limited), and the workstation version (pay, but with a testing period before you pay).

    The advantage (to me) is that it supports very old operating systems that VB does not.

    --
    Cheers / Saludos,

    Carlos E. R.
    (from 11.2 x86_64 "Emerald" at Telcontar)

  9. #9

    Default Re: Virtualization Software

    Quote Originally Posted by Carlos E. R. View Post
    On 2010-10-04 13:06, Rolandh31 wrote:
    >
    > Can anyone suggest a good free Virtualization Software Package that work
    > on OpenSuse with the KDE Desktop, as I need to use Windows for some
    > applications that have not got a Linux equivelant, Namely Reserch In


    Everybody suggest virtualbox, so I'll add vmware. Not free, but with gratis versions. There is the
    server version (gratis, gives some problems currently, and may disappear soon), the player (a bit
    limited), and the workstation version (pay, but with a testing period before you pay).

    The advantage (to me) is that it supports very old operating systems that VB does not.

    --
    Cheers / Saludos,

    Carlos E. R.
    (from 11.2 x86_64 "Emerald" at Telcontar)
    143.78 is a bit steep for VMWare Workstation when Parallels Desktop for Linux is 54.99. I'm downloading the free version of VMWare.

    When I try to start a new Virtual Machine in VirtualBox I get this error and I don't know how to solve the problem

    Roland

  10. #10
    Join Date
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    Frisco, TX
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    1,233

    Default Re: Virtualization Software

    Rolandh31 wrote:

    >
    > Can anyone suggest a good free Virtualization Software Package that work
    > on OpenSuse with the KDE Desktop, as I need to use Windows for some
    > applications that have not got a Linux equivelant, Namely Reserch In
    > Motions BlackBerry Desktop Manager and the drivers for my Printer and
    > Scanner, so I would also need something with USB pass through. Or if
    > there isn't any free virtualization software that will dowat I want
    > that's free then something that is not expensive that's paid for. I
    > like the look of Parallels Desktop 4 for Windows & Linux but I'm not
    > sure if I would be able to justify paying £54.99 for the ammount of use
    > that it will get?


    (long winded post follows)

    Well.. there are choices.

    1. VirtualBox Oracle free
    2. VirtualBox Oracle
    3. VMware personal free/non-free
    4. VMware ESX enterprise
    5. Xen Citrix free
    6. Xen Citrix
    7. Xen SLES free
    8. Xen RHEL free (deprecated)
    9. KVM free
    10. RHEL RHEV (warped kvm) NOT free

    I want to lay all of these out because there are a LOT of choices (and
    probably even more if you want to add Qemu, etc to the list).

    A popular choice is quasi-hypervisor on top of an existing USED OS. This
    would be 1,2,4 in particular. I would ONLY recommend that if you have NO
    other choice. That is, the cost of adding an extra platform is so extreme
    that you have to use an existing platform which already serves some other
    purpose. It's the highest risk choice as well... I do NOT recommend doing
    this for anything worthwhile... though it is fun to play with.
    Unfortunately, if you want some kind of intregrated desktop (with desktop-
    ish features), this may be the only route. It's VERY VERY VERY high risk
    since a crash to the hosting platfrom takes out ALL of the VMs as well. For
    example, you decide to play a 3d games using proprietary Nvidia or AMD
    drivers... suddenly the desktop goes south.... end of story. And with that
    said, don't expect FULL featured Windows desktop experiences... I've seen
    some things that come close, but ONLY with VERY VERY specific components (no
    GENERAL solution).


    The industry choice is standalone hypervisors. That would be 4,5,6,7,8.
    These are OS's (NOT Linux) that are designed to run VMs. Often times they
    come with a controlling guest instance that is ofter times a Linux variant.
    So, like in the case of ESX (not ESXi) there is a Red Hat default VM that
    has ties into the guts of the VM and there is some cooperation that happens
    between it and the VMs. ESXi, VMware's other hypervisor, removes the
    default Red Hat controlling console and (unfortunately) some features. Xen
    is also a standalone hypervisor and the Dom0 (their name for the controlling
    guest) is usually a Linux (there are choices for Dom0 with Xen). Xen has
    maturity and is probably the closest to having all of the features that
    VMware ESX has to offer today (which is to say, it's closest, yet still
    pretty far away).

    Numbers 9,10 represent something different.

    10 is as a result of a Red Hat purchase. They were not competing well using
    their version of Xen which was pitted up against Novell's SLES. This is
    99.99999% Red Hat's fault as they told everybody Xen was complete JUNK when
    Novell became the first to ship with it. Then, when Red Hat shipped a
    mildly newer variant (btw, SLES ships the newest variant between the two
    now) to try to compete with Novell, nobody took it very seriously... why
    would Red Hat want us to use something that they themselves have labeled as
    JUNK? Ok... back to the purchase, Red Hat's Xen failed, therefore they
    bought Qumranet which had developed a priority protocol that worked with kvm
    (more later) combined with a .Net (Windows 2003 Server SP2) based control
    panel (SQL Server DB, the whole Microsoft nine yards effectively). This is
    RHEV TODAY. Basically all Red Hat did was remove the interior kernel and
    replace it with theirs... and presto... a Red Hat product! However, it is
    NOT RHEL 5.4 or 5.5 (depending on which RHEV version you're running).
    Designed to be a standalone hypervisor style of install, the RHEV-H is
    ideally supposed to be a black box with the only hooks being from the
    Microsoft .Net control panel (RHEV-H + the .Net piece = RHEV). In fact, the
    standalone RHEV-H unrolls itself in appliance like fashion.. so any change
    you make to RHEV-H will undo on the next reboot (unless you roll your
    changes into the rollup file). There's no good documentation on this. Yes,
    there are hooks like many appliances to allow you to roll in your own files,
    but it gets REALLY messy when you need to adjust the kernel of RHEV-H. Red
    Hat is working on porting the .Net pieces over to JBoss (yes.. it will
    require JBoss in the future).

    Finally, #9. This is kvm. It is the hypervisor that comes with Linux.
    Thus kvm is probably the ideal choice for hypervisor on the cheap. Yes....
    you have the choice of whether you choose to dedicated the host to just
    being a hypervisor or using the host for other things (albeit with some
    risk). It is NOT RHEV kvm... please understand that. It uses libvirt for
    it's communication protocol... something that both Xen and kvm can use.
    RHEV, again, speaks a proprietary protocol. Kvm is the future, but
    successful implementation is a bit daunting for most. It will likely get
    better in the future... my guess is that most kvm (and possibly most free
    Xen) deployments are built using configuration files that are NOT understood
    well (the "hey, it works!", "-What did you change?", "I don't know." test).

    What have I used? I have used VMware ESX, VMware Server, VMware
    Workstation, VMware Player, SLES Xen, RHEV and VirtualBox. The platform
    that runs the most stuff is VMware ESX (and a close second is probably ESXi,
    though we're just now getting around to using that). I'm not if I'd
    recommend RHEV. I mean, it's GOTTA change. So if you go with RHEV today,
    realize that there are MULTIPLE radical changes coming your way. First the
    transition to JBoss and later there will be the switch to libvirt (after a
    LOT of modifications). We have NOT used kvm.. not yet. It is probably the
    least mature... but it is quite usable today.. just remember that Red Hat
    has a LOT of radical plans for libvirt... and I'm not sure how that will
    affect kvm and/or Xen moving forward.

    My workstation (what I'm typing on) is an openSUSE 11.3 running as a
    paravirtualized 64bit guest under Xen 4.0 (which comes with SLES 11 SP1).
    My Dom0 (duh) is a SLES 11 SP1 Dom0, but I use it strictly for controlling
    Xen. I have NOT attempted anything like USB pass through with Xen. So all
    of this writing may be for naught.

    My primary desktop Windows 7 64bit instance runs on VirtualBox on top of an
    openSUSE 11.1 host (which I uses primarily as a frontend host apart from
    running Win7). My only Windows peripheral that I wanted to use directly
    attached is a device that is NOT supported by Windows 7... oh well...

    With regards to Xen vs. VMware ESX... today (for heavy production
    customers), I'd go VMware... but we're doing some heavy tests on Xen to see
    what it's capable of. Who knows, we might switch. We've got about 7 Xen
    guests up right now in test (including my desktop as mentioned)... but the
    heavy tests are coming (large scale guests with 16G of memory running
    SLES9... due to customer requirement). Xen has "bugs"... well.... I'll call
    them bugs. Truth is it comes with pieces that work well and other that
    aren't quite ready for primetime... it's just not well documented with
    regards to what truly works well vs. what does not work well.

    AFAIK, if USB pass through is a must have... you're stuck with the mature
    but questionable VMware Workstation and Player... and possibly Server...
    product lines AND the venerable VirtualBox (which I DO recommend).

    So... why not VirtualBox? (sorry, yes... there's more to type)

    VirtualBox is now in the hands of Oracle. Which has made it VERY CLEAR that
    IF an acquired piece of software does NOT generate DIRECT revenue to them...
    then they shut it down. That SHOULD make every user of Virtualbox quiver a
    bit (including myself). There is Virtualbox OSE, the GPL, edition. So the
    goods news is that there EXISTS a truly free version.... BUT, Oracle likes
    to strangle their FOSS advocates by removing services and support donated to
    such projects (again, BE WARNED). Look for Oracle's "free for non-
    commercial use" VBox to move to non-free and look for Oracle to pull out any
    hw and network service support for the GPL version. If Oracle follows their
    existing pattern with regards to FOSS.

    To make matters worse, Oracle's "free" (but non-free) edition of VirtualBox
    is the one with the most desktop USB and other features. Hopefully, the GPL
    version will get caught up and possibly surpass Oracle's version in the
    future (hoping).








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