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Thread: How to install x11 for ngspice

  1. #1
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    Default How to install x11 for ngspice

    I wish to install ngspice to simulate a circuit. The program requires x11. I've installed a number of x11 packages to no avail, including going to the x.org and attempting to install an x server.

    Thank you in advance for any help.
    The greatest obstacle to discovery is not ignorance, it is the illusion of knowledge.
    Daniel J. Boorstin US Patent Office

  2. #2
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    Default Re: How to install x11 for ngspice

    Quote Originally Posted by Parthenolide
    I wish to install ngspice to simulate a circuit. The program requires
    x11. I've installed a number of x11 packages to no avail, including
    going to the x.org and attempting to install an x server.

    Thank you in advance for any help.
    Hi
    What openSUSE release? ng-spice is available here, which should pull in
    the dependencies;
    http://software.opensuse.org/search?...ude_debug=true

    --
    Cheers Malcolm (Linux Counter #276890)
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  3. #3

    Default Re: How to install x11 for ngspice

    I am sorry, but I understand nothing about this thread:

    ngspice to simulate a circuit. The program requires x11
    No it doesn't:

    Code:
    ~> ngspice
    ******
    ** ngspice-18 : Circuit level simulation program
    ** The U. C. Berkeley CAD Group
    ** Copyright 1985-1994, Regents of the University of California.
    ** Please submit bug-reports to: ngspice-bugs@lists.sourceforge.net
    ** Creation Date: Wed Dec 17 12:46:02 UTC 2008
    ******
    ngspice 373 ->
    Ngspice is command line, but you may want to use some other program which is not command line as a front end.

    I've installed a number of x11 packages
    You are saying that, apart from this requirement, you do not use any GUI at all?

    ...to simulate a circuit...
    This is probably the difficult way of achieving this requirement; is there a reason for taking this approach (which there may well be); the trouble with using a suite of programs without any real integration is that it can be an order of magnitude more difficult to get your first result, because not only do you have to get all the modelling stuff right, you have to simultaneously get all the capture stuff right and the ngspice directives right and connection between ngspice and the analysis program and potentially the connection between capture and ngspice. This might all be easy if the error messages pointed you in any unambiguous way to the source of the problem....which you'll probably have guessed by now that they don't.

    I'm not suggesting that it is bad, just that, depending on what you are doing and how you are doing it, this may have a rather long learning curve.

  4. #4
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    Default Re: How to install x11 for ngspice

    Malcom:
    Thank you very much. The link did the trick.

    Markone:
    I was trying to install ng-spice from a tar ball. It failed to configure because of the x11 issue.

    Your post suggests there may be a simpler simulation tool. I am interested in learning about this, as I'm not interested in a long learning curve. I'm planning to simulate a circuit that involves LEDs, NPN transistor, N-Mosfet, zenner diode, regular diodes, several resistors and capacitors.

    Thanks.
    The greatest obstacle to discovery is not ignorance, it is the illusion of knowledge.
    Daniel J. Boorstin US Patent Office

  5. #5
    JosephKK NNTP User

    Default Re: How to install x11 for ngspice

    On Sat, 26 Jun 2010 00:16:02 GMT, Parthenolide
    <Parthenolide@no-mx.forums.opensuse.org> wrote:

    >
    >Malcom:
    >Thank you very much. The link did the trick.
    >
    >Markone:
    >I was trying to install ng-spice from a tar ball. It failed to
    >configure because of the x11 issue.
    >
    >Your post suggests there may be a simpler simulation tool. I am
    >interested in learning about this, as I'm not interested in a long
    >learning curve. I'm planning to simulate a circuit that involves LEDs,
    >NPN transistor, N-Mosfet, zenner diode, regular diodes, several
    >resistors and capacitors.
    >
    >Thanks.


    Well you can go two basic ways, you can try the gEDA/GAF suite which is
    all *nix, or you can use wine and LTSpice which is real user friendly but
    has no PWB tools no BOM (Well just schematic capture and simulation).

    I am willing to try to help either way.

  6. #6
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    Default Re: How to install x11 for ngspice

    I loaded the gEDA suite. Looks like a very powerful set of tools with an easy to use graphical interface. Thanks JosephKK.
    The greatest obstacle to discovery is not ignorance, it is the illusion of knowledge.
    Daniel J. Boorstin US Patent Office

  7. #7
    JosephKK NNTP User

    Default Re: How to install x11 for ngspice

    On Mon, 28 Jun 2010 20:56:02 GMT, Parthenolide
    <Parthenolide@no-mx.forums.opensuse.org> wrote:

    >
    >I loaded the gEDA suite. Looks like a very powerful set of tools with an
    >easy to use graphical interface. Thanks JosephKK.


    You may want to get dialed in to their mailing list, it is pretty darn
    active though. I show 4800 posts since 8/29/09, an average over 100 per
    week. You may want to make a separate account for it.

  8. #8

    Default Re: How to install x11 for ngspice

    sorry for delay in replying; hadn't seen the new activity in this thread:

    Quote Originally Posted by Parthenolide View Post
    Markone:
    I was trying to install ng-spice from a tar ball. It failed to configure because of the x11 issue.
    ngspice does not require x11 - it is a command line program, so finding the parts of x11 that are required to make it work is always going to be hard work (given that there aren't any). It is a long while ago, but I think that when I installed it (and that's probably a different version of OpenSuSE, etc, etc) it was available from repos. If so, that is the easy way of installing. Why do anything else?

    The inference that i take from your earlier post is that you do not currently have x11 installed and that therefore you are unlikely to use any GUI; is that correct?

    Your post suggests there may be a simpler simulation tool.
    Simpler....that really is not the question. It is 'long learning curve to first successful result' or not. Some quite complex tools have a short initial learning curves (and then you keep on learning for ever), some simple tools are pretty brutal in their initial learning curve. You sound like you need LTSpice, which will run under WINE and is quite a good piece of kit and is (comparatively) easy to get started with.

    Geda and the various command line utils that can be used with it or stand alone are really quite powerful, but I wouldn't recommend them to a simulation neophyte. There is inevitably quite a learning curve in a simulation app and using a suite of programs without good integration and/or a good, easy, get-you-going guide piles on extra problems at the very time when you probably have too many already. You will quickly be into the situation in which you get an incomprehensible error message and you won't really know whether it app a, app b or app c, or your set-up of the connection between them, or your use of the libraries or a problem with what you are trying to simulate or your simulation conditions.

    My guess is that this will be too much for you, and you will sink into the sand with rapidity.

    I am interested in learning about this, as I'm not interested in a long learning curve. I'm planning to simulate a circuit that involves LEDs, NPN transistor, N-Mosfet, zenner diode, regular diodes, several resistors and capacitors.
    Good luck...LTSpice, even though you will probably have to add to the libraries, which isn't the most intuitive process, you'll be better placed than starting from ground zero.

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