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Thread: Why openSUSE uses i586 architecture

  1. #1
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    Question Why openSUSE uses i586 architecture

    Hi,

    I'm just curious to know, why openSUSE uses i586 Architecture? Fedora and Ubuntu use i686 Architecture.

    Regards,
    Anant

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    Default Re: Why openSUSE uses i586 architecture

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    Because is openSUSE, nor Fedora nor Ubuntu

    when programs are compiled they are turned into machine code which can
    only work for a certain processor (cause of its new or "special"
    features) , the i??? line of processors is all compatible from the
    bottom up, so if a program was compiled for i386 , it will work on all
    processors that came after it, but if it was compiled for a Pentium ? it
    cant work on a i386 because it has instructions which didn't exist on
    that processor

    so, openSUSE support more processors than Fedora or Ubuntu

    - --
    VampirD

    Microsoft Windows is like air conditioning
    Stops working when you open a window.
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    Comment: Using GnuPG with SUSE - http://enigmail.mozdev.org/

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  3. #3

    Default Re: Why openSUSE uses i586 architecture

    Isn't i586 architecture 32 bit and i686 architecture is 64 bit? If so I might have an answer for you...

    Daqar
    Acer TravelMate 7730G Intel C2D P8400, 4GB memory, OpenSUSE 12.3 w. KDE 64bit. 4 year of linux experience, 19 years of Windows experience.

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    Default Re: Why openSUSE uses i586 architecture

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    No, i386, i486, i586 and i686 are x86 architecture (32 bits) and the
    x86_64 are the 64 bits

    - --
    VampirD

    Microsoft Windows is like air conditioning
    Stops working when you open a window.
    -----BEGIN PGP SIGNATURE-----
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  5. #5

    Default Re: Why openSUSE uses i586 architecture

    Isn't i586 architecture 32 bit and i686 architecture is 64 bit? If so I might have an answer for you...

    Daqar
    No, the 64 bit architecture in "IBM-Compatible" PCs are called AMD64, which is backward-compatible to 32bit ix86 processors or intel64 which is compatible to AMD64.

    In the ix86 series, the "x" is the "generation" of the CPUs. There are 16-bit ones in the early generations, but normally "ix86" is used for the 32-bit generations.

    That means i586 is the 5. generation, while i686 is the 6. generation. All of those processors always stay compatible to previous generations, so one can run software compiled for i386 on i686 and even on AMD64, but this software won't use the latest op-code commands, because they are compiled without them in mind, of course.

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    Default Re: Why openSUSE uses i586 architecture

    Quote Originally Posted by VampirD View Post
    -----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
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    Because is openSUSE, nor Fedora nor Ubuntu

    when programs are compiled they are turned into machine code which can
    only work for a certain processor (cause of its new or "special"
    features) , the i??? line of processors is all compatible from the
    bottom up, so if a program was compiled for i386 , it will work on all
    processors that came after it, but if it was compiled for a Pentium ? it
    cant work on a i386 because it has instructions which didn't exist on
    that processor

    so, openSUSE support more processors than Fedora or Ubuntu

    - --
    VampirD

    Microsoft Windows is like air conditioning
    Stops working when you open a window.
    -----BEGIN PGP SIGNATURE-----
    Version: GnuPG v2.0.12 (GNU/Linux)
    Comment: Using GnuPG with SUSE - Enigmail: A simple interface for OpenPGP email security

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    mSEAn3G5x7bK845gSYqvTKHT4ncSpie0
    =jQ2j
    -----END PGP SIGNATURE-----
    In this case I believe its better to use i386 architecture, it will support more processors.

    Regards,
    Anant

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    Default Re: Why openSUSE uses i586 architecture

    On Thu, 2010-03-25 at 19:06 +0000, Daqar wrote:
    > Isn't i586 architecture 32 bit and i686 architecture is 64 bit? If so I
    > might have an answer for you...


    Architecturally and historically...

    5 is the original Pentium (e.g. the P60, P90, etc...)

    6 is the Pentium Pro (and also Pentium-M)

    7 is the P4 netburst Pentiums (NetBurst pretty much only won the "clock"
    war, this is probably the primary reason for returning to i686 style
    for the Pentium-M... your 1.4Ghz PIII runs circles around your 2.4Ghz P4
    in most cases)





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    Default Re: Why openSUSE uses i586 architecture

    Quote Originally Posted by anantg View Post
    In this case I believe its better to use i386 architecture, it will support more processors.
    Anything that's i386 or i486 will be too weak to run openSUSE 11.x properly and building for i386 it will penalise all the rest of us with faster processors by forbidding the use of the extra instructions that come with the higher members of the series. Even a 300MHz Celeron is a i586, so openSUSE is quite generous already.

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    Default Re: Why openSUSE uses i586 architecture

    Quote Originally Posted by ken_yap View Post
    Anything that's i386 or i486 will be too weak to run openSUSE 11.x properly and building for i386 it will penalise all the rest of us with faster processors by forbidding the use of the extra instructions that come with the higher members of the series. Even a 300MHz Celeron is a i586, so openSUSE is quite generous already.
    So you mean to say that Ubuntu or Fedora will not run properly on the older processors like Celeron?

    Regards,
    Anant

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    Default Re: Why openSUSE uses i586 architecture

    Quote Originally Posted by anantg View Post
    In this case I believe its better to use i386 architecture, it will support more processors.

    Regards,
    Anant
    High Level Assembler (hla) has an excellant description of all the changes in processor technology as it pertains to hardware, parallel processes, programming, and application / OS development. To try and summarize as brief as I can, our current level of OS's are so entrenched in multi-core (which i386 doesn't handle) and multiple instruction streaming (since the pentium mmx technology) unless you don't ever plan to play music, play games, watch video, or multi-task, the minimum required architecture is i586. Use of i386 and i486 still can be done but without any multimedia functionality and special builds are needed since they are non-mainstream now.

    A i586 architecture has all the i386 instructions + mmx + multi-process register stacks + parallel instruction execution (the ability to start certain instructions before the previous one has completed all it's cycles) ** this allows the appearance of a one instruction per cycle when in fact the instructions may really be taking 2-4-8-16 cycles each. Where i586 is primarily 32bit with some 64bit emulation and some 64bit and is capable of doing 16bit or even 8bit if it has to, the i686 really suffers on speed and execution if asked to handle below 32bit. There is little benefit in i686 from what I see. I need to see what happening with the whole Intel/HP VR-IA64 scene (has it progressed, has it died like Intel's IA64?) What I know of it is pretty old now, it was supposed to keep compatibility of i586, scrap i686 compatibility, and promote highly enhanced 64bit RISC but then who knows...
    When your up to your a** in Alligators it's pretty hard to remember you intended to drain the swamp (author unknown)

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