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Thread: partition full but not full

  1. #1

    Default partition full but not full

    Why is df failing at subtraction?
    name@name:~> df -k
    Filesystem 1K-blocks Used Available Use% Mounted on
    /dev/sda4 20641788 4782352 14810796 25% /
    udev 510836 1244 509592 1% /dev
    /dev/sda5 194829436 125762364 59170232 69% /home
    /dev/md2 961423936 912586704 0 100% /backups
    name@name:~> df -h
    Filesystem Size Used Avail Use% Mounted on
    /dev/sda4 20G 4.6G 15G 25% /
    udev 499M 1.2M 498M 1% /dev
    /dev/sda5 186G 120G 57G 69% /home
    /dev/md2 917G 871G 0 100% /backups
    name@name:~> df
    Filesystem 1K-blocks Used Available Use% Mounted on
    /dev/sda4 20641788 4783152 14809996 25% /
    udev 510836 1136 509700 1% /dev
    /dev/sda5 194829436 125763420 59169176 69% /home
    /dev/md2 961423936 912586704 0 100% /backups
    name@name:~> df -i
    Filesystem Inodes IUsed IFree IUse% Mounted on
    /dev/sda4 1313280 192875 1120405 15% /
    udev 127709 1216 126493 1% /dev
    /dev/sda5 24756224 1437 24754787 1% /home
    /dev/md2 61054976 13 61054963 1% /backups

    the story is i have a computer hosting a virtual box guest. I added more HD space to the guest, but adding two 1TB drives to the host (suse11.1) building a 917GB raid 1 partition (/dev/md2) with yast, which the host mounts at /backups. The total contents of this disk is /lostandfound which has nothing in it and /name/LargeBackupDisk.vdi which is a 880GB maximum size virtual box virtual hard drive. (I purposefully made the virtual drive smaller then the real drive to avoid this problem.)
    the guest cannot boot because the host system is full. The host system cannot be emptied because there only 1 file on the disk.
    Why is df failing at subtraction? I should have another 36 Gigs.

    Not to mention the entire reason i'm in this mess is that instead of using rm -r at the command line, I foolishly moved a bunch of large files in to the trash can on the guest (also suse 11.1 KDE3.5) and told it to empty the trash thinking this might delete the files. Does KDE3.5 make copies of things it deletes with the trash can or something?

    anyways, If someone know why 917G==871G that would be great.

  2. #2

    Default Re: partition full but not full

    There are exactly missing 5% of space. It's because of reserved blocks, which can only be written by root-processes. If this is just a data-partition and a full partition will not cause the system to be unbootable, you can remove this reserved blocks using this command (as root):

    Code:
    tune2fs -m 0 /dev/md2

  3. #3
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    Default Re: partition full but not full

    However there are also performance reasons why the filesystem should not be filled to the brim. The exact percentage is subject to debate though.

  4. #4

    Default Re: partition full but not full

    Quote Originally Posted by ken_yap View Post
    However there are also performance reasons why the filesystem should not be filled to the brim. The exact percentage is subject to debate though.
    You're right, but 5% are really too much in times of hard drives with TB-space available. A few hundred MB should be much enough.

    BTW: Why is 1% the smallest option for this (except 0)? Or is there any way to set another value?

  5. #5
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    Default Re: partition full but not full

    Quote Originally Posted by balta3 View Post

    BTW: Why is 1% the smallest option for this (except 0)? Or is there any way to set another value?
    I did not check source, but I suppose it is just an integer value. When designing ext. files system, nobody thought about that big partitions.
    Henk van Velden

  6. #6

    Default Re: partition full but not full

    thank you, thats what i needed.

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