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Thread: Changing Default Character Encoding?

  1. #1

    Question Changing Default Character Encoding?

    How can I change my system's default character encoding? I need to change it to ISO-8859-1 for compatibility reasons, but I can't find an option for this...

  2. #2
    Join Date
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    Default Re: Changing Default Character Encoding?

    I suspect you will have to do it on an application by application basis. Most have an option to do this on export where it isn't built in anyway.

  3. #3
    palladium NNTP User

    Default Re: Changing Default Character Encoding?

    jwesleycooper wrote:
    > How can I change my system's default character encoding? I need to
    > change it to ISO-8856-1 for compatibility reasons, but I can't find an
    > option for this...


    i may be wrong but i don't think there is a system wide setting that
    would affect all users and/or all applications..

    i think each user has the chance to set each application to what is
    wanted by THAT user for THAT application...remember, openSUSE and
    Linux is a multi-user system from the ground up....that is to say one
    user might normally want ISO-8859-4, while another (you maybe) might
    want ISO-8856-1 in both browser and email but, occasionally wanna
    swtich to ISO-8859-2 to exchange email with granny in the old country..

    so, look within the setup for the applications you use, and other
    users can do the same..

    here, in Firefox i go: Menu > Edit > Preferences > Content > Fonts &
    Colors > Advanced > Character Encoding > spin the Default Character
    Encoding to the desired...

    but, i do not see an 8856-1 offered....i guess could be because i
    don't have that language installed on my machine (?)

    the setting for my Thunderbird mailer is similar...i guess you will
    find it similar on whatever you use for email, browsing, letter
    writing, etc..

    if you have a particular application or desktop environment and need
    more help, just specify the question..

    --
    palladium

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Changing Default Character Encoding?

    You can look at the LC_TYPE and LANG shell variables.

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Changing Default Character Encoding?

    Martin Helm wrote:

    > You can look at the LC_TYPE and LANG shell variables.

    Sorry a typo it is

    LC_CTYPE and LANG

  6. #6

    Default Re: Changing Default Character Encoding?

    The app in question is a 3rd party Java IDE, which was required by my course and I had to manually extract into my filesystem... It gave me a message telling me that copy/paste functionality might not work correctly if I didn't change to said encoding... so how would I fix the copy/past encoding defaults then?

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Changing Default Character Encoding?

    The question is: what would you be copying to/from? If you are only copying to/from say Kate, then all you need to do is change the encoding used in Kate.

    AFAIK the copy/paste buffer won't change whatever is in it; the differences in encoding will only be apparent when you paste to/from an application which expects a different encoding.

  8. #8
    palladium NNTP User

    Default Re: Changing Default Character Encoding?

    jwesleycooper wrote:
    > The app in question is a 3rd party Java IDE, which was required by my
    > course


    i now guess you are learning about 'developing' IT applications as
    part of school course work?

    since one purpose of education is to learn how to solve problem, i
    guess your current problem is finding where the answer is already laid
    out for you..

    hint 1: my guess is it is in the IDE's documentation...perhaps in the
    application's README or help files (in my experience most folks who
    build a multi-platform capable application go to the trouble of
    telling folks HOW to use it on there platform...therefore, their may
    even be a README.linux file)... or a help forum like this one, but
    hosted by the 3rd party application...or in Java information available
    at your school, or on the net....have you looked in any/all of those
    places?)

    hint 2: for sure, i do not think you _really_ want to change your
    system wide default ISO just to run that one application..

    hint3: instead set a session's environment as suggested by Martin Helm
    and THEN launch your Java app into it

    hint 4: see man set
    and (maybe), make a script with a set statement and a launch command..

    i don't know how to do that--but, i'm neither a developer nor learning
    to be one..

    good luck...

    --
    palladium

  9. #9
    Join Date
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    Default Re: Changing Default Character Encoding?

    What version of the distro are you using? That matters!

    Assuming 11.2: start yast, then go to

    System ---> Language ---> Details and uncheck "Use UTF-8 Encoding". Then select the desired locale setting. Click 'OK' and reboot.

    Expect some surprises. E.g the default encoding for MySQL is set to UTF-8 since version 11.2. And all filenames using characters outside the ASCII range must be fixed.
    Technology is 'stuff that doesn't work yet.' -- Bran Ferren

  10. #10
    Join Date
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    Default Re: Changing Default Character Encoding?

    jwesleycooper wrote:

    >
    > The app in question is a 3rd party Java IDE, which was required by my
    > course and I had to manually extract into my filesystem... It gave me a
    > message telling me that copy/paste functionality might not work
    > correctly if I didn't change to said encoding... so how would I fix the
    > copy/past encoding defaults then?
    >
    >

    If you need to change the default encoding for the java application you can
    simply do it by looking at the way it is started.

    Java apps are often started with something like

    java -Xmx200M -jar something.jar

    just as an example.

    Add the following variable to it

    java -Dfile.encoding=ISO-8859-1 ... (the remaining original command line)

    But google for it I wrote this down from memory.



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