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Thread: GNOME will not recognize me as SU

  1. #1

    Exclamation GNOME will not recognize me as SU

    I installed openSUSE yesterday and it does not recognize me as the super user. every time i do anything it asks me for the main password and it will not give me access to the root folder, the lost and found folder, and will not let me move applications that i have installed to their propper folders. I have tried logging out and then back in but it is still doing the same thing. any suggestions would be appreciated.

    Thanks, Austin

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
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    43.009 N, 73.172 W
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    Default Re: GNOME will not recognize me as SU

    The root password (SU) is the same as your user password. Did you enter the password when you were asked for it? I do it all the time.

  3. #3

    Default Re: GNOME will not recognize me as SU

    i am able to do alot of functions by entering my root password but editing files and folders, i cant do. on the file there is a red box with an X in it.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    43.009 N, 73.172 W
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    Default Re: GNOME will not recognize me as SU

    In a terminal window, enter this command for the file(s) you can't edit, then paste the output here.

    Code:
    ls -l

  5. #5

    Default Re: GNOME will not recognize me as SU

    it is the actual root folder that i am unable to get into i dont know if i am doing it wrong or what but it would not let me do anything with it in the terminal is said "bash: root/" is a directory.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    London
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    426

    Default Re: GNOME will not recognize me as SU

    Hi,

    What exactly did you enter in the terminal to get that output?

    --
    Regards,
    Barry Nichols

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    43.009 N, 73.172 W
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    Default Re: GNOME will not recognize me as SU

    I don't use Gnome desktop so I don't know if there is a root version of the file manager? You could try that.

    Or, from a terminal window use the 'su -' command. You will then become root and have access to all the root files. Be careful working as root, as you could do a lot of damage.

    Here's an example of using 'su -'

    Code:
    @boreal:~> su -
    Password:
    boreal:~ # whoami
    root
    boreal:~ #

  8. #8
    palladium NNTP User

    Default Re: GNOME will not recognize me as SU

    austin296 wrote:
    > I installed openSUSE yesterday and it does not recognize me as the super
    > user. every time i do anything it asks me for the main password and it
    > will not give me access to the root folder


    there is no "main password" each user on the system has a
    password...you have password and the superuser (aka: root) also has a
    password...the normal way to get things done in Linux is to log into
    Gnome as yourself...always...and then "become root" only as needed and
    only as long as needed....which is why when you try to do something as
    root it asks for the root password..

    but, if i might offer a suggestion: if the total of your experience
    with Linux began yesterday you need to slow down some, because you are
    as likely to introduce more errors than you can imagine, and for sure
    do more harm than good....until you know about the system here...for
    example:


    > the lost and found folder


    why would you want in there?
    (i've used Linux most of ten years and never had the need, not once!)


    > and will not let me move applications that i have installed to their
    > propper folders.


    applications installed correctly will automatically *be* in their
    proper directories..

    there will be NO need to move them anywhere..

    how did you install? let me guess you tried to install them the so
    last century way of going to a web site, downloading something,
    clicking on it or running a program against it to unpack..etc etc

    STOP! that is the wrong way...use YaST which will access *thousands*
    of free and open software which can do more stuff than you now imagine..

    might be handy for you to read some here: http://en.opensuse.org/Concepts


    > I have tried logging out and then back in but it is
    > still doing the same thing.


    ah yes, see Linux is a relatively stable and mature operating system
    and as such is rather predictable..

    that is, i can predict that you will seldom see things fix themselves
    just by logging out/in, rebooting or even reinstalling...systems that
    "fix" themselves everytime they are rebooted are UNstable systems that
    have to clean out the crud everytime they restart..

    here, you should (unless you have installed a new kernel) _expect_ the
    system you shut down to start up again, everytime..


    > any suggestions would be appreciated.


    my suggestion is to accept my congratulations on giving Linux a try
    and my understanding of how steep is the learning curve you are
    own...lots to learn here, and unfortunately the more you know and
    understand that brand name system out of Washington state the more
    difficult it may be for you to get going here...until you accept that
    it really is impossibly frustrating to try to force Linux to do it
    Redmond's way..

    you might enjoy this: http://tinyurl.com/8b9s6

    -=welcome=-

    oh, to edit a file as root is simple:

    press and hold Alt and then hit F2, up will pop a run dialog, in it type:

    gnomesu gedit>

    give the root password when asked and up will pop a basic GUI file
    editor operating with full root powers...with it you can tweak your
    system or MURDER your system....so, use it wisely...and my best advice
    is as soon as you are done with THAT file, close gedit....don't leave
    it laying around like a loaded gun just waiting for you to forget if
    has special power (to kill your system)..use root ONLY so long as you
    must use it, and only when you must use it..

    and, you move things at will with:

    gnomesu nautilus

    same cautions! and VERY careful...because (for example) if you move a
    directory in your home from one place to another with a root powered
    nautilus you will have just made it impossible for YOU to access it
    normally again! why, because of that rule i just told you: only use
    root when you *must*...and you do not have to be root to move your own
    files around in your home!! see, if you move it as root it becomes
    owned by root and only root can read/write root own files...

    --
    palladium

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