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Thread: Lost applications

  1. #1

    Default Lost applications

    Bit of a newbie here, so ....

    Installed Postfix docs and PostfixAdmin successfully!!!! Software manager says so, but neither seem to appear anywhere in selectables - desktop, applications, YAST, etc. Logged on both as root and user but not there for either. Is there a secret place where new apps hang out?

    Alison
    PS used the OneClick install in the main OpenSUSE add-ons area for PostfixAdmin.

  2. #2

    Default Re: Lost applications

    An application will appear in the startmenu (whether under KDE, Gnome, Xfce or other freedesktop based window managers) only if this applications's package includes a .desktop file, which get copied (in most cases) in /usr/share/applications. Many not GUI applications don't have one and can be started from a terminal only (unless you write a suitable .desktop file yourself).

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    relative
    Posts
    1,172

    Default Re: Lost applications

    Quote Originally Posted by Alisoncc View Post
    Bit of a newbie here, so ....

    Installed Postfix docs and PostfixAdmin successfully!!!! Software manager says so, but neither seem to appear anywhere in selectables - desktop, applications, YAST, etc. Logged on both as root and user but not there for either. Is there a secret place where new apps hang out?

    Alison
    PS used the OneClick install in the main OpenSUSE add-ons area for PostfixAdmin.
    Hi!
    I wrote a blog entry about a similar situation, take a look:
    Find executables for missing start menu applications hashing my weekdays.
    Hope that helps.
    http://mydailyhash.wordpress.com/
    http://yami.googlecode.com/

  4. #4
    palladium NNTP User

    Default Re: Lost applications

    Alisoncc wrote:
    > Installed Postfix docs and PostfixAdmin successfully!!!!


    how did you install?

    i ask because if you install with YaST or Zypper it will normally add
    icons/names to the menu list..

    as far as i know it is available in the standard openSUSE repos, and
    that would be the fastest/easiest/best way to install it and all its
    dependencies..

    most pretty new to Linux or openSUSE folks can benefit from a read
    here to become a little familiar with some basics:

    http://en.opensuse.org/Concepts

    especially interesting might be the section on software
    handling/package management..

    *however* Postfix is not a package most _users_ ever get involved with
    so i wonder if maybe you are setting up a (mail?) server....and, if so
    ....well, mail servers don't need icons, desktops, GUIs etc...those
    things just turn company money into heat..

    --
    palladium

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Earl Shilton UK
    Posts
    298

    Default Re: Lost applications

    Postfixadmin is a web based configuration utitly isn't it? For configuring postfix with multiple virtual domains/users?

    In that case, try here: Postfixadmin – setup/install guide for virtual mail users on Postfix | David Goodwin for some instructions. It also explains how to configure postfix.

    You should be able to access yours at http://localhost/postfixadmin or something. Its files are (iirc) kept in /usr/share/postfixadmin which is added as a virtual directory in apache (your web server) as /postfixadmin.

    Postfix is not a gui based program, you won't get an icon in the menu for any kind of configuration UI.
    You can try searching yast for postfix; there is a gui called (i think) postconf. IMHO it's better to do it properly though, in postfix's configuration files by hand:

    Code:
    sudo nano /etc/postfix/main.cf
    & read the comments in there. google if you don't understand. And then test your results.
    Last edited by weighty_foe; 19-Feb-2010 at 03:23. Reason: Spelling
    Happily using Linux since 1998
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