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Thread: Free openSuSE courses

  1. #21
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    Default Re: Free openSuSE courses

    Great to see that there are some interest in this idea. And also, good to see that I can learn something at once, spelling it openSUSE and noting else
    (hmm, when I started it was SuSE 6.4 .. I think back then, they spelled it like that, perhaps old habit or perhaps my memory are not what it used to be)

    However, a lot of brilliant thoughts, and the big question is - how do we move forward? Since this is a community effort, I think we should start with small goals that are possible to accomplish, sure we could scan the different possibilities but I still think we should start small and simple not to crush ourselves with dim goals in the horizon.

    Perhaps palladium is right, a bunch of tutorials in the wiki is the right place to start? Later on these could be turned into online courses with some exams and diplomas?
    Personally, I think professional exams that you actually pay for are laying far ahead in the distance, but someday..

  2. #22
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    Default Re: Free openSuSE courses

    On Wed, 03 Feb 2010 18:36:02 +0000, elwis wrote:

    > Great to see that there are some interest in this idea. And also, good
    > to see that I can learn something at once, spelling it openSUSE and
    > noting else
    > (hmm, when I started it was SuSE 6.4 .. I think back then, they spelled
    > it like that, perhaps old habit or perhaps my memory are not what it
    > used to be)
    >
    > However, a lot of brilliant thoughts, and the big question is - how do
    > we move forward?


    I would propose that we assemble a group to determine the vision for
    something like this. That's not to say that short tutorials in the wiki
    would not be something to do as well - nothing wrong with a two-pronged
    approach.

    I also participate in the openSUSE mailing lists, and I can post the
    proposal there as well to see if there's interest in participating from
    that part of the community.

    > Since this is a community effort, I think we should
    > start with small goals that are possible to accomplish, sure we could
    > scan the different possibilities but I still think we should start small
    > and simple not to crush ourselves with dim goals in the horizon.


    I agree. It would be difficult to do multiple "courses" at once without
    first identifying the resource needs and filling those needs with people
    to take on various tasks.

    > Perhaps palladium is right, a bunch of tutorials in the wiki is the
    > right place to start? Later on these could be turned into online courses
    > with some exams and diplomas?


    Sure, for gathering content together, that's a good starting point. I've
    mentioned "instructional design" but realise I haven't really defined it
    - the basic principle behind instructional design is to assess what the
    knowledge gap of the target audience for the courses is and then
    determine the best way to fill the gap. From there it gets into the flow
    of the course, identifying lab work to be done, and so on.

    > Personally, I think professional exams that you actually pay for are
    > laying far ahead in the distance, but someday..


    Agreed - but it never hurts to explore the options there as well. I know
    the cost of, for example, publishing an exam through VUE is quite
    expensive, but if we had some courses to start with, maybe we could find
    a sponsor to cover that cost.

    So let's start by looking at what the goals of such training would/could/
    should be, and from there we can identify how to meet the need. If some
    who want to contribute content have ideas on tutorials and the like, that
    would be great content for the wiki so there's a starting point for the
    content (though it may need to be massaged as it's put into 'course'
    format - one thing that happens with professional writing is editing, re-
    editing, and re-re-editing <g>).

    Jim

    --
    Jim Henderson
    openSUSE Forums Moderator

  3. #23
    palladium NNTP User

    Default Re: Free openSuSE courses

    > A Rose by any other name ...

    is not as open..

    --
    palladium

  4. #24
    palladium NNTP User

    Default Re: Free openSuSE courses

    elwis wrote:
    > (hmm, when I started it was SuSE 6.4 .. I think back then, they spelled
    > it like that, perhaps old habit or perhaps my memory are not what it
    > used to be)


    "Novell, one of the founding members of the Open Invention Network,
    opened widely the distribution development to outside contributors in
    2005, creating the openSUSE Project. . . The name "S.u.S.E" was
    originally a German acronym for "Software und System-Entwicklung",
    meaning "Software and systems development", a name not so original for
    a software company. However, the full name has never been used and the
    company has always been known as "S.u.S.E", later shortened to "SuSE"
    in October 1998."

    cite: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SUSE_Linux_distributions

    --
    palladium

  5. #25
    palladium NNTP User

    Default Re: Free openSuSE courses

    i remember one of the main reasons i switched from Win3.1 to IBM's
    OS/2 v3.0 was i read in one of the PC mags of the day that 1) it was a
    no-brainer to install 2) it had an icon on the desktop that was a one
    click way to the internet AND 3) included an on screen step-by-step
    walk though of how to do Windows tasks in Warp..

    and, it lived up to all three of those promises....and STILL got
    squashed by the Redmond Evangelists and illegal/predatory market
    practices..

    --
    palladium

  6. #26
    Join Date
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    Default Re: Free openSuSE courses

    I really hope this guy would be interested, he has done some impressive work already:
    YouTube - theurbanpenguin's Channel

    Anyway, let's see if there are some broader interest, guess it's too much work for a fulltime developer with kids and a lot of snow in the yard alone..

  7. #27
    Join Date
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    Default Re: Free openSuSE courses

    On Wed, 03 Feb 2010 19:16:21 +0000, palladium wrote:

    > and, it lived up to all three of those promises....and STILL got
    > squashed by the Redmond Evangelists and illegal/predatory market
    > practices..


    Well, the whole OS/2 development process was pretty bizarre anyways,
    because Microsoft had a hand in the development; it was when things fell
    apart between IBM and Microsoft regarding OS/2 that the OS started really
    having problems.

    I can remember using packet drivers to get TCP/IP support on Win 3.x,
    though. :-)

    Jim


    --
    Jim Henderson
    openSUSE Forums Moderator

  8. #28
    Join Date
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    Connecticut, USA
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    Default Re: Free openSuSE courses

    Quote Originally Posted by elwis View Post
    Perhaps palladium is right, a bunch of tutorials in the wiki is the right place to start? Later on these could be turned into online courses with some exams and diplomas?
    Video tutorials can be uploaded to YouTube in the meantime, with links or players on the wiki page.

    Just saw a presentation last night where the person had a Zoho (Google-docs like) presentation embedded on his blog so you had the control right there to go slide-by-slide through it without having to download or navigate anywhere. It was either small or you could make it full-screen.
    "Linux provides freedom, problem is most users don't know what it is or how to use it." ~me
    Friends don't let Friends wear red shirts on away parties!
    Linux User #477531 | Danbury Area Computer Society (www.dacs.org)

  9. #29
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    Seattle, WA
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    Default Re: Free openSuSE courses

    On Wed, 03 Feb 2010 19:26:03 +0000, elwis wrote:

    > I really hope this guy would be interested, he has done some impressive
    > work already:
    > 'YouTube - theurbanpenguin's Channel'
    > (http://www.youtube.com/user/theurban...DB024E50520F51)
    >
    > Anyway, let's see if there are some broader interest, guess it's too
    > much work for a fulltime developer with kids and a lot of snow in the
    > yard alone..


    I know Andrew quite well, in fact - he's a Novell CNI and a good friend -
    he's one I was thinking of who has some applicable skills. :-)

    Jim
    --
    Jim Henderson
    openSUSE Forums Moderator

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
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    Aveiro, Portugal
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    Default Re: Free openSuSE courses

    I don't want to be disruptive, but this has to be said at some point.

    "Free, as in freedom of speech, not as in free beer".


    People do want everything for free... Let's make a small metaphore here.

    You want something to be certified for sale within European Union, it has to be certified with "CE", same applies to the US and other parts of the world with "RoHS" certification.
    This process involves a credited institution like SGS, TV, APCER or whatever. This process involves money spending.

    If you realize that you want a "free" course, lets compare to something such as Microsoft Certified (mouse) Engineer or eventually Red Hat certified Engineer, which is credited by Microsoft (for MSCE) and Red Hat (RHCE). This involves spending money.

    Yet again, Novell is in business to make money. From the Marketing perspective it comes down to this:

    Goal of a Organization: Generate revenue/proffit (can come in several ways, like social profit, finantial profit, etc).
    Means of an Organization: The Product
    Target of an Organization: People in general, consumers.

    I would suppose Novell is spending money on this, as such they have to get their revenue from someplace. I would doubt they would be giving away free courses (certified like the commercial ones from Red Hat for instance), without taking nothing from the process.

    Honestly, I remember SuSE from the old times for being a company that invested in it's community (they sponsored a lot of events, including one I organized in Portugal back in 2001), and they spended money developing linux and hardware drivers, most people will remember SuSE pathbreaking on this subject specially those who had Intel i740, Voodoo Banshee, etc etc.

    Everyone remembers the contributions of Red Hat for the kernel development, and most important (from my perspective) to GCC compiler (didn't we all loved Red Hat 7.0? Best distro ever, despite of what the bad mouthing gossip said).
    I wonder now, in current days, who is still placing money to develop Linux? Honestly, companies like Novell have enough bearing to press hardware manufacturers to start giving native support...

    The sad truth is that everyone is deviating from "freedom of speech" to "free as in free beer".

    Honestly for those who have done MSCE (I did it back on NT4.0), we know what this courses actually are, and in most cases are a waste of money. Where to click, what to enable, blah blah blah... But all of that is really crappy if you don't have low level knowledge on the system and protocols used. This why so many boxes are owned despite of all the progress in the last 10 years around security.

    What you should aim actually is to have your local governament supporting Free Software, and use it on the educational system. This would make more sense.

    I do recon a lot of places that when people apply for a job, if they mention things like MSCE, they're completly off the job oppurtunity, because it's a stupidity testemony.

    It's not a company or distribution provider that should form people on the real stuff, low level and protocol level. That as to come from somewhere else, like a degree, Masters, etc. Their role in this subject is what is really should be, handling some weird tools made for dummies. The quality of a sysadmin doesn't come from certifications At least most of BOFH's around will know what I mean with this, and will recon that most stuff running on top of a Linux kernel is well documented, too well documented. If people wanna step over this learning process, they fail big time.

    Anyway, the best tool ever to help understanding linux, is vim, master vim, and you'll master all the rest

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