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Thread: Free openSuSE courses

  1. #11
    palladium NNTP User

    Default Re: Free openSuSE courses

    elwis wrote:
    > or whatever the community feel like producing.


    you speak of 'community' like you expect a lot of folks to get busy
    helping this project along...and, maybe they will...i hope they will..

    but, for now: if you have the spare time to throw at getting this
    academy off the ground, i'd highly recommend you spend that time now
    helping to get the new wiki to fly...see:
    http://news.opensuse.org/2009/12/22/...wiki-underway/

    imo that would do more in the short term to solidify the openSUSE
    brand than a long range, long term commitment to generate and keep
    updated a free training course..

    --
    palladium

  2. #12
    palladium NNTP User

    Default Re: Free openSuSE courses

    elwis wrote:
    > I was thinking something like this 'OpenSuSE Academy'


    i think i forgot to mention, please learn how to spell it correctly:

    it is not
    SuSE, S.u.S.E, SUSE, OpenSuSE or OpenSUSE

    it used to be a lot of different things and while it may change again,
    today it is openSUSE everytime, everywhere..

    --
    palladium

  3. #13
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    Default Re: Free openSuSE courses

    Quote Originally Posted by palladium View Post
    elwis wrote:
    > I was thinking something like this 'OpenSuSE Academy'


    i think i forgot to mention, please learn how to spell it correctly:

    it is not
    SuSE, S.u.S.E, SUSE, OpenSuSE or OpenSUSE

    it used to be a lot of different things and while it may change again,
    today it is openSUSE everytime, everywhere..

    --
    palladium
    Yeah, I wish they would just call it "SUSE", since Novell's products are "SUSE Linux Enterprise Desktop" and "SUSE Linux Enterprise Server", so they aren't really "SUSE", they are "Enterprise Desktop/Server" spins.

    To get the "Academy" off the ground and community-involved needs a lot of leg-work to get things started so people can see WHAT it is, and then be able to get those interested able to contribute.

    That does bring up some interesting ideas, though; like is there a way to embed a tutorial video in the wiki? Also, what are soem good desktop capturing applications to do a tutorial video?
    "Linux provides freedom, problem is most users don't know what it is or how to use it." ~me
    Friends don't let Friends wear red shirts on away parties!
    Linux User #477531 | Danbury Area Computer Society (www.dacs.org)

  4. #14
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    Default Re: Free openSuSE courses

    Quote Originally Posted by dragonbite
    That does bring up some interesting ideas, though; like is there a way
    to embed a tutorial video in the wiki? Also, what are soem good desktop
    capturing applications to do a tutorial video?
    Hi
    Recordmydesktop is one;
    http://recordmydesktop.sourceforge.net/about.php
    http://software.opensuse.org/search?...ecordmydesktop

    I use vmware workstation which has the ability to record, not sure
    about the others vbox etc?

    --
    Cheers Malcolm (Linux Counter #276890)
    SUSE Linux Enterprise Desktop 11 (x86_64) Kernel 2.6.27.42-0.1-default
    up 19 days 3:27, 4 users, load average: 0.03, 0.11, 0.08
    GPU GeForce 8600 GTS Silent - CUDA Driver Version: 190.53


  5. #15
    Jim Henderson NNTP User

    Default Re: Free openSuSE courses

    On Tue, 02 Feb 2010 05:46:02 +0000, elwis wrote:

    > Hi Jim, glad to hear you.
    >
    > First of all, the way I see it there's two goals with building a free
    > training/class community. Spread the openSuSE brand and share knowledge
    > among users.
    > (that's why I would like to call it "beginning python programming on
    > openSuSE" not on "Linux")


    I have often viewed training materials as marketing materials of a sort -
    though with more in-depth technical detail than you'd find in traditional
    "marketing fluff" - ie, light on fluff, high on content. But from the
    standpoint of name recognition (in particular), it's very important.

    > About the topics, I suppose it depends on what people would like to
    > write, or would Novell do the hard work? Obvious topics would be
    > installing/configuring openSuSE, chapters about configuring the desktop,
    > setting up a homeserver etc


    Knowing the workload the course development team is under (since the team
    reports to the same manager that I do), it would be a community effort,
    but I could get advice on some good instructional design practices to
    incorporate into the project. That would make for materials that were
    teachable.

    From a format standpoint, there's a number of options - ranging from
    print books (for which the project would need to find a publisher or fund
    self-publishing - the Blender project has done something like this so
    could be a template).

    That type of format lends itself to "classroom" style learning, but that
    may not be ideal for a community project - though as something that could
    be used as a "canned" presentation for LUG meetings, that could be useful
    and an easier-to-consume format. That would result in modules that were
    at most a couple of hours long rather than, say, a 4-day class (which
    would require an instructor, classroom, computers, and other resources).

    But there are other formats as well - for example, at Novell, we are
    really heavy into "On Demand" using Moodle Rooms. The sessions are pre-
    recorded and include demonstrations and a workbook for labs, but the
    student has to set things up for the labs.

    Combined with something like SUSE Studio, though, installation/
    configuration for doing the labs would actually be fairly trivial to do
    because the environment could be a pre-built VM set up using Studio.

    > Others could be more general, as I said, but pushing the openSuSE brand.
    > "Developing ASP .NET on openSuSE", "Graphical Design on openSuSE",
    > "Multimedia .."


    Some of these would also be good ideas to include - though for something
    like python development (from your earlier example), from a learning
    perspective, I think the more generic course would be preferred by the
    audience. That doesn't mean, though, the community couldn't develop
    courses along these lines and have a "SUSE Flavour" to them, license
    under Creative Commons and let other distros leverage the work this
    proposed team would do.

    > Specifying a certain distro will also assure that people will get going.
    > There's nothing more frustrating then a "Getting started" guide where
    > you fail at step two. In the diversed land of the penguin I'm afraid
    > this happens too often.


    This is very true. Extending the original concept of the project to more
    generic topics does allow for a broader range of topics to be covered
    with (as I seaid earlier) a "SUSE Flavour" - as long as the knowledge is
    portable to other distros. From a student perspective, portability of
    knowledge is highly valued if a skill applies across multiple platforms.

    > Anyway, when the happy student finish his course, a nice pdf diploma
    > will arrive in his mailbox (always reward)and he is a little bit more
    > confident doing daily work in his distro of choice.


    Sure - a course completion certificate is something that could be put
    together, along with actual testing. Looking from a testing perspective,
    though, the ideal would be what in the testing business (which is my
    specific role in Novell's training business, though I've done instruction
    and course development as well) we call a "high stakes" exam - ie, a
    proctored exam that is closed-book. Test publishing is somewhat
    expensive to do, though - costing several thousand dollars per exam.

    However, as it happens, I'm attending a conference next week for the
    Association of Test Publishers, and will have the opportunity to chat
    with many testing publishers. I could see what options are available
    from that standpoint, of course with the caveat that this is still *very*
    early at this point, but that we're just looking to see what options are
    available.

    Jim

    --
    Jim Henderson, CNA6, CDE, CNI, LPIC-1, CLA10, CLP10
    Novell Technical Training

  6. #16
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    Default Re: Free openSuSE courses

    On Tue, 02 Feb 2010 20:06:02 +0000, dragonbite wrote:

    > Sorry for them being scattered.. I just rambled them off the top of my
    > head but I have to return to work now..


    Excellent ideas - one that comes to mind for me is a "Windows to Linux"
    skills translation course. Take common tasks done in Windows and
    translate them to how you do them in Linux. Something like that would
    certainly help adoption because it could reduce the learning curve for
    people making the switch.

    Jim





    --
    Jim Henderson
    openSUSE Forums Moderator

  7. #17
    palladium NNTP User

    Default Re: Free openSuSE courses

    dragonbite wrote:
    > Yeah, I wish they would just call it "SUSE"


    but it is not just SUSE...it is openSUSE, open as in free and open
    source software (aka: FOSS, F/OSS, FLOSS)
    <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Free_and_open_source_software>...

    when you have installed openSUSE you have installed a *pure* free and
    open source software system..

    which differs from many other distros and is the reason that (for
    example) Mint and others are born doing things that openSUSE cannot do..

    *until* packman is enabled and NON-open source software is invited in..

    see?

    --
    palladium

  8. #18
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    Default Re: Free openSuSE courses

    On Wed, 03 Feb 2010 16:17:26 +0000, palladium wrote:

    > it used to be a lot of different things and while it may change again,
    > today it is openSUSE everytime, everywhere..


    Part of the process of doing any serious course development would be a
    round of both technical review and editorial review. Those become doubly
    important if and when we start talking about localization (ie,
    translating to other languages). :-)

    Jim

    --
    Jim Henderson
    openSUSE Forums Moderator

  9. #19
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    Default Re: Free openSuSE courses

    On Tue, 02 Feb 2010 19:36:01 +0000, elwis wrote:

    > Not sure I have time for it the nearest months but if there will be
    > somekind of "openSuSE academy" website I might get some "Getting started
    > python/mono/java/groovy dprogramming on openSuSE" going..


    Perhaps before we get to that point, though, we should start by looking
    at a vision for what we want people to get out of it. It's always good
    to start with the end in mind. The vision can change and be tweaked, of
    course, but let's start by figuring out what we want to do.

    Since I've got background in training, testing, and certification, I'd be
    happy to be a focal point and provide some coordination and to drive the
    discussion. I think there's some really serious potential here to do
    something that (as far as I know) no other Linux distribution is doing,
    and I'm honestly quite excited about the prospect of seeing what is
    possible with a community training material development model.

    I also can think of a few people I've worked with in the past several
    years who have experience in course development who may have an interest
    in contributing their expertise to a project like this from an
    instructional design perspective.

    Jim
    --
    Jim Henderson
    openSUSE Forums Moderator

  10. #20
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    Default Re: Free openSuSE courses

    Quote Originally Posted by palladium View Post
    dragonbite wrote:
    > Yeah, I wish they would just call it "SUSE"


    but it is not just SUSE...it is openSUSE, open as in free and open
    source software (aka: FOSS, F/OSS, FLOSS)
    <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Free_and_open_source_software>...

    when you have installed openSUSE you have installed a *pure* free and
    open source software system..

    which differs from many other distros and is the reason that (for
    example) Mint and others are born doing things that openSUSE cannot do..

    *until* packman is enabled and NON-open source software is invited in..

    see?

    --
    palladium
    A Rose by any other name ...
    "Linux provides freedom, problem is most users don't know what it is or how to use it." ~me
    Friends don't let Friends wear red shirts on away parties!
    Linux User #477531 | Danbury Area Computer Society (www.dacs.org)

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