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Thread: entries in /etc/fstab

  1. #1
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    Default entries in /etc/fstab

    Hay,
    I have a multiboot system with ubuntu and suse.
    On my system i have 2 data EXT3 partitions : sda7 and sdb6
    in ubuntu I edited /etc/fstab with the following entries :
    Code:
    /dev/sda7	/media/sda7	ext3	defaults	0	0
    /dev/sdb6	/media/sdb6	ext3	defaults	0	0
    In order to mount them at startup. can i use the same entries in /etc/fstab in suse and put them at the end of the file or should I entry something else ?

  2. #2
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    Default Re: entries in /etc/fstab

    When you want them mounted on the same place as you did in Ubuntu, why not? But /media/sda7 and /media/sda6 (what an awfull names you choose) must exist.
    Henk van Velden

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    Default Re: entries in /etc/fstab

    Quote Originally Posted by hcvv View Post
    When you want them mounted on the same place as you did in Ubuntu, why not? But /media/sda7 and /media/sda6 (what an awfull names you choose) must exist.
    Why not, isn't very clear like that. Better than C,D or E in windows
    In ubuntu I labeled them "LINUXDATA_SDA7" and "LINUXDATA_SDB6"
    Simple and clear.
    So I can use exact the same entries in suse's /etc/fstab ?

  4. #4
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    Default Re: entries in /etc/fstab

    I already said: Why not? It is all Unix/Linux and /etc/fstab is as old as ....

    BTW to compare with Windows C, D .. may not be very clever here. The way this is done in Windows is completely different from Unix/Linux. The main things in Unix/Linux are:
    . that it hides any connection to the hardware away, something that you reintroduce by giving them the partition names they got because of the partitioning and not of any logical usage of that disk space;
    . they can be mounted in the directory tree where needed and are not, as in Windows) sitting at the bottom of a new tree (starting at A:, B:, etc.), again I doubt if you mount them on a place logicaly connected to their usage (/media being the place where it is logical to mount the removable datacontainers like CDs, DVDs, USB-sticks and the like).

    But As I already pointed out, it is your choice (Linux is about choice) and nobody stops you from mounting a DVD with a movie at /lib/modules/home/var/elephant.

    It is always difficult to assess the level of knowledge from people asking questions here, so forgive me if I point you to something trivial for you, but maybe a look at SDB:Basics of partitions, filesystems, mount points - openSUSE may be of interest to you.
    Henk van Velden

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    Default Re: entries in /etc/fstab

    Okay, so if I understand correctly there is no harm in mounting the part. in /media/sda7 and /media/sdb6 but you would rather mount in let'say /home/guy/documenten and /home/guy/movies and so on. It's a matter of taste or personal organisation or is ther more to it than that

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    Default Re: entries in /etc/fstab

    Quote Originally Posted by summer69 View Post
    Hay,
    I have a multiboot system with ubuntu and suse.
    On my system i have 2 data EXT3 partitions : sda7 and sdb6
    in ubuntu I edited /etc/fstab with the following entries :
    Code:
    /dev/sda7    /media/sda7    ext3    defaults    0    0
    /dev/sdb6    /media/sdb6    ext3    defaults    0    0
    In order to mount them at startup. can i use the same entries in /etc/fstab in suse and put them at the end of the file or should I entry something else ?
    This should work.
    It doesn't really matter where in the file, but I would place them with the other partitions.
    Leap 15_KDE
    My Articles Was I any help? If yes: Click the star below

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    Default Re: entries in /etc/fstab

    Thanks very much to all. Let you know the outcome

  8. #8
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    Default Re: entries in /etc/fstab

    It is a matter of organising ones system. You are not only the user, but also the system manager. May be I am a bit .. about it, but I feel that a lot of people are very much influenced by how it was once when they used a MS-DOS bases system. Forget it and try to learn how a real OS does manage these things.

    Alternative: you can mount in /media/moviedisk and then as guy inside your homedirectory do:
    Code:
    ln -s /media/moviedisk movies
    It has the same result that when you start your file-manager (in your home), you will immideately see your movies directory (well working in your desktop I should say "folder movies" shouldn't I?).
    Henk van Velden

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    Default Re: entries in /etc/fstab

    Quote Originally Posted by hcvv View Post
    It is a matter of organising ones system. You are not only the user, but also the system manager. May be I am a bit .. about it, but I feel that a lot of people are very much influenced by how it was once when they used a MS-DOS bases system. Forget it and try to learn how a real OS does manage these things.

    Alternative: you can mount in /media/moviedisk and then as guy inside your homedirectory do:
    Code:
    ln -s /media/moviedisk movies
    It has the same result that when you start your file-manager (in your home), you will immideately see your movies directory (well working in your desktop I should say "folder movies" shouldn't I?).
    So you say to put the mount point in /media/moviedisk and put a link in /home/guy.
    Why not mount directly on /home/guy/moviedisk. I haven't used links in linux before so I have no experience with it
    What is the advantage of mounting in /media/moviedisk and put a link in /home/guy
    Code:
    ln -s /media/moviedisk movies

  10. #10
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    Default Re: entries in /etc/fstab

    I did not say you "must" mount and then use a link.

    I suggested to mount where you want/need it (because I come from a Unix background and think that is a very normal way to do this).

    Then I suggested you an "alternative". Mount somewhere else (albeith stll on a locical place with a logical name) and then make a symbolic link. Or may be even more symbolic links, what when you have more users and they all want see the movies? Make a link from everebodys home and they will all be happy.

    I only show you that there are more solutions and that it is up to you (as system manager) to choose between them. But you can only make the (halfway) correct choices when you have knowledge. It is therefore that I give you hints and a link (in an earlier post above). Only to increase your Unix/Linux knowledge and experience, so that you can make the right decisions.

    And when you say: "I haven't used links in linux before so I have no experience with it", then gather some experience. You do not need a mount point or any troublesome thing. Just, as guy, create a link inside your home directory:
    Code:
    ln -s /etc/sysconfig sconf
    Now you can search/read through this directory by using sconf from your home.
    Enough of it? From your home:
    Code:
    rm sconf
    And you are back to the original situation.
    Read the man page on ln, try to find out what the difference is between "hard" and "soft/symbolic" links and why hard links are confined to be within the same file system.

    Back to you original question. Your suggestion to mount in /home/guy/movies is perfect. Put this line not before the one about /home if you have one, so /home is mounted before you mount /home/guy/movies. Read the man pages on fstab and mount, so you understand where it is used for (mainly for mounting at boot and also when using mount you do not have to specify all the parameters, because mount finds them in fstab).
    Henk van Velden

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