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Thread: red hat certification

  1. #1

    Post red hat certification

    well
    how much value you give to to red hat certificates????

  2. #2
    platinum NNTP User

    Default Re: red hat certification

    a red hat certificate and five euros buys a pretty dang good cup of
    joe in Amsterdam, Paris, Vienna and London..

    --
    platinum

  3. #3

    Default Re: red hat certification

    While an MCSE (aka "Must Consult Somebody Experienced") gives you at least enough for the cup.

    :-)

  4. #4
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    Default Re: red hat certification

    Quote Originally Posted by Akoellh View Post
    While an MCSE (aka "Must Consult Somebody Experienced") gives you at least enough for the cup.

    :-)
    funny but soooooooo true!
    worked 14 years as EET (Electronics Engineering technologist)
    1987 - 1989 Took A+ certification & EET upgrading (way too M$ Biased)
    1990 Took MCSE and MCST (way too biased IMHO)
    2001 Took RHCE (strong overall platform independent coverage but lacked some important M$ comparative explanations)

    Many companies in USA and Canada insist on A+ and MSCE even when their target market is Linux/Unix. The RHCE is far more comprehensive on both Hardware and Software concerns.

    For anything leaning towards hardware concerns, someone with MCSE without A+ would definitely need to consult an expert. The same can't be said of a RHCE who can better handle all issues.
    When your up to your a** in Alligators it's pretty hard to remember you intended to drain the swamp (author unknown)

  5. #5
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    Default Re: red hat certification

    I would go with the LPIC certs up to level 3. This will give you a much better understanding of Linux than a vendor based cert.

    Novells CLP and CLE are decent certifications, I personally prefer those to the RHCE due to superior content and the practicum exam experience.
    LPIC 1 ,2 and 3 outpaces the lot.

    and yes I have them all.

    Cheers
    J
    Linux# makes_a_network_feel_good.sh

    Linux and BSD solutions

  6. #6
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    Default Re: red hat certification

    Is the Red Hat cert worth it? I am of the opinion that any certificaiton has its merit (even the MS certs). I have personally noticed that studying for Linux certifications, a lot of content is based off of Red Hat (due to its market position), so anytime spent studying for Red Hat also prepares you for other, more general certs (such as Linux+).

    On a slightly related note, I recently received this highly esteemed certification, and I recommend everyone in IT pursue it as well.


    My personal philosophy:
    The only way you won't find something is if you stop looking.

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    Default Re: red hat certification

    Quote Originally Posted by srschifano View Post
    Is the Red Hat cert worth it? I am of the opinion that any certificaiton has its merit (even the MS certs). I have personally noticed that studying for Linux certifications, a lot of content is based off of Red Hat (due to its market position), so anytime spent studying for Red Hat also prepares you for other, more general certs (such as Linux+).

    On a slightly related note, I recently received this highly esteemed certification, and I recommend everyone in IT pursue it as well.


    I tend to agree with you that more certs are better cause as I have found, when it comes to technology, not just Linux/Distro/Windows stuff, what is lacking in one is picked up by another. I even pondered if there shouldn't be a general intro to Linux course that isn't so weighted on technical aspects but more in tune to bringing people up to speed on using the OS more effectively. M$ spoiled so many by not wanting them to hone good practices. Now when they come here, many don't know by lack of using skills what they can do.
    Comprehensive hardware knowledge only goes so far.
    Much of the basis behind devices and device driver software is a lost art and as such often overlooked in courses.
    While RHCE does hold alot of distro specific stuff, it has a fair amount of core Linux stuff that is distro independant.
    Haven't come across that one yet. So will take your word on it for now.
    When your up to your a** in Alligators it's pretty hard to remember you intended to drain the swamp (author unknown)

  8. #8
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    Default Re: red hat certification

    On Thu, 15 Oct 2009 21:46:01 +0000, techwiz03 wrote:

    > I tend to agree with you that more certs are better cause as I have
    > found, when it comes to technology, not just Linux/Distro/Windows stuff,
    > what is lacking in one is picked up by another. I even pondered if there
    > shouldn't be a general intro to Linux course that isn't so weighted on
    > technical aspects but more in tune to bringing people up to speed on
    > using the OS more effectively. M$ spoiled so many by not wanting them to
    > hone good practices. Now when they come here, many don't know by lack of
    > using skills what they can do.


    From the standpoint of the general intro course that you're talking
    about, would this be for, say, a desktop administrator or just a general
    user?

    Jim

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    openSUSE Forums Moderator

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    Default Re: red hat certification

    Quote Originally Posted by techwiz03 View Post
    ...Haven't come across that one yet. So will take your word on it for now.
    If you're referring to the cert badge I posted, its supposed to be a joke. Application Security Specialist, i.e. ASS...so now I can say, not only am I an ASS, but I'm certified!

    I did have to take a general Linux course like you describe for my undergraduate degree, so such classes do currently exist. The focus was basic Linux terminology, a little bit of history, installation, and a very broad introduction to the command line. It explained all of the whys and wherefores of the operating system, and gave me a solid understanding of how things fit together.

    The distro we used in the class was SuSE 10.0 Professional (which is, incidentally, why I'm here now). The book used in the class mapped to the Linux+ certification from CompTIA, although it had a disclaimer that it only covered half the topics on the test (the other half were covered in a second, more expensive book ). Still, I learned more about how operating systems in general are supposed to work than I ever did with any of my Microsoft classes. And it was only until I got into higher level courses that I learned more specific information (in my case, information about system administration).
    My personal philosophy:
    The only way you won't find something is if you stop looking.

  10. #10
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    Default Re: red hat certification

    Quote Originally Posted by srschifano View Post
    If you're referring to the cert badge I posted, its supposed to be a joke. Application Security Specialist, i.e. ASS...so now I can say, not only am I an ASS, but I'm certified!
    Wow! you caught me sleeping at the keybrd! tuche!

    I did have to take a general Linux course like you describe for my undergraduate degree, so such classes do currently exist. The focus was basic Linux terminology, a little bit of history, installation, and a very broad introduction to the command line. It explained all of the whys and wherefores of the operating system, and gave me a solid understanding of how things fit together.
    Yes a good ground breaker course per se as part of a formal study is a pre-requisite to a strong foundation. I was actually thinking along the lines of a non-formal intro as most people just don't consider formal training when they are just interested in being able to use an op-sys. Someone, forgot who now but back in 1999 on the mandrake 9.0 version did a good video presentation as a kinda online course and I really wish I had of downloaded it before it disappeared. It was basically a three part video of about 1 hour each that walked a person through the principals of installing Linux (any flavor), how to make alternate installation methods (from CD, from Harddisk, from floppy, from network), explained the command line tools and file system, then introduced GUI's Gnome, KDE, FVWM, and how they are really frontends to the command line functionality. The person that did it was quite the artist. By the time I remembered to pickup some more cd's and had time to go back to get it, it was gone. I'd do one myself if I thought I could do even a fractionally descent job. I think this guy/gal used a video input editing device in combination with vcr and video camera and screen streaming capture.

    When your up to your a** in Alligators it's pretty hard to remember you intended to drain the swamp (author unknown)

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