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Thread: nginx vs Apache Web server

  1. #1

    Default nginx vs Apache Web server

    Nowadays desktop computers are powerful enough to run server softwares. There is this sort of installation known as WEmp (Windows, nginx,MySQL and PHP) where nginx is the Web Server.

    I was reading that Apache is the Web server one can use on Linux systems. nginx has been found to work well on Windows systems than Apache and that it consumes less memory.

    Has anyone used nginx before? Is it stable and fast on Linux system.

    Kind read this

  2. #2
    platinum NNTP User

    Default Re: nginx vs Apache Web server

    > Has anyone used nginx before? Is it stable and fast on Linux system.

    Apache is stable, fast _and_ a *reliable*, *secure* (with little
    chance of a KGB backdoor), enterprise ready server on Linux, so why
    experiment?

    Apache too heavy? sip a cool Apache Lite! less filling AND still
    secure, reliable, fast and industrial strength code from a KNOWN and
    respected hacker team..

    you might ask yourself, how quickly will/can nginx respond to
    discovered security deficiencies?

    --
    platinum

  3. #3

    Default Re: nginx vs Apache Web server

    Well. well. In short you are telling me that Apache is good and fine and if I want a faster one I should go for ApacheLite. Good. Am still waiting for more replies to check on people's view and then make a decision

  4. #4
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    Default Re: nginx vs Apache Web server

    Main problem with nginx seems to be that it isn't very popular which in turn means there isn't a whole being written about it making the set up of it a lot more difficult as there fewer examples to find.

    Apache on the other hand is by far the most popular webserver and documentation is abundant. Not to mention it has its own YaST plugin to make life easier.

    Yes, nginx is lighter than apache.. however it's not like apache is a fat pig that will go down when you more than one visitor.
    Unless you're using a really old system (think of something with 64MB ram) or are planning to run site getting several hundred of hits a second I'd say go with apache as it's much easier to set up. (not to mention part of the default repositories, so compiling or adding 'questionable' repositories involved)
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  5. #5
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    Default Re: nginx vs Apache Web server

    Someone I know used nginx as a front-end to Apache to serve static files, leaving the scripted stuff to Apache.

    Replacing Apache with nginx for static file serving – Be the signal

    But until you have to set up a heavy traffic site such as the one he had to, I wouldn't worry about the limitations of plain Apache yet.

    Make sure you understand the problem you are trying to solve before choosing the technology, not the reverse order.

  6. #6

    Default Re: nginx vs Apache Web server

    Well. I have seen that nginx is not well documented. Well it seems that Apache is still superior despite its high memory usage.

    The biggest win for nginx also was the conversion of a caching mod_proxy frontend  lot of static files, inefficiently served by Apache  to the new, inbuilt caching module in nginx 0.7. Apache mod_read has not been highly tweeked aslo.

    I am building a two different blogs using wordpress and codeigniter both to be served by Apache Web Server and MySQL database Server. One is for an institution and the other for a business client. I expect more traffic on the institution because of the number of students who am sure would be blogging daily via there notebooks and phone.

    I think I will Stick to Apache coz it will still take me time to learn nginx.

  7. #7
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    Default Re: nginx vs Apache Web server

    Look, you're gonna need Apache for the scripted stuff anyway, so go with that then measure the performance. If it's adequate you're done. If not, then you can learn nginx. The site mentioned in my link is a very well-known current affairs commentary site and gets a lot of traffic.

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